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BDFL - Memuneh
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Topic # 199164 7-Aug-2016 11:29
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Just received:

 

 

Three quarters of Kiwi parents are concerned their children may have access to online pornography, yet fewer than a third use online parental controls. New Zealand ISP Slingshot has introduced an easy online tool that blocks the darker corners of the web and helps protect Kiwi kids.

 

The biggest concerns parents face around internet safety was their child’s exposure to pornographic sites and ‘other’ inappropriate material, the Perceptive Research revealed. What’s more, 40% of parents think their children might attempt to access R16+ sites, while 16% have already caught their child looking at inappropriate material online.

 

Taryn Hamilton, General Manager of Slingshot, says all parents want to keep their kids safe online, but there’s a general lack of understanding how to. To help put parents’ minds at ease, Slingshot has launched Family Filter – an online tool that blocks inappropriate and dangerous material.

 

“With the simple switch of a button, Family Filter gives the control back to parents by blocking access at a network level, encompassing all devices connected to the home Wi-Fi. While we can’t bubble-wrap our kids, we can certainly put measures in place to help mitigate online risks and bring the topic to the surface,” he says.

 

While 90% of Kiwi parents surveyed think they have a fair idea of their child’s online behavior, only a third actually check their child’s web history and more than half of parents reported that their children access the internet from their bedroom.

 

Family Filter removes access to:

 

  • R16+ nudity and pornographic sites
  • Known hacked or infected websites
  • Sites featuring: dating, drugs, gambling, alcohol, tobacco
  • Websites about hacking, dark web and other illegal activities
  • Suicide and self-harm.

“Gone are the days of having one family desktop sitting in the lounge – our children are now surfing the net across multiple devices. It’s important that all parents talk to their kids about internet safety, but thanks to services like Family Filter, we can feel a little more secure in restricting the sites our kids can access,” adds Hamilton.

 

Further research by Middlesex University, in June this year, found that of 1,001 UK children aged 11 to 16 years, more than half had viewed online pornography and of those, nearly 60% reported seeing online pornography for the first time at home. Interestingly, while some children chose to seek out online pornography, they were just as likely to come across it by accident.

 

Rebecca Daly-Peoples, Auckland based Clinical Psychologist, adds the real danger is that young people, including teenagers, often believe that what they see on the internet is real.

 

“Young people typically do not have the emotional and psychological capacity to process this information in healthy ways and early exposure to inappropriate sexual content can lead to premature sexualisation and unhealthy ideas about sex and relationships.

 

It’s important all parents have open conversations with their kids about the material they might encounter online; but it’s equally important to have a means to filter explicit and dangerous content so that kids are not coming across it by accident,” she says.

 

NetSafe, which provides cyber safety and security advice for New Zealand, recommends three key ways parents can help prevent children seeing online pornography: install an internet filtering programme or use a filtered internet service, teach children about good searching skills and talk to them about the images and things they may come across, and how to deal with them.

 

“Family Filter is available for free to all Slingshot customers for the first 12 months and can be easily accessed and activated through a Slingshot customer account. Customers can turn Family Filter on and off whenever they like, giving parents complete control over when they restrict access to R16+ sites. Switch it on when the kids get home from school and turn it off again when they go to bed,” adds Hamilton.

 





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  Reply # 1605802 7-Aug-2016 12:53
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Great to see ISP's stepping up with family friendly features for technologically limited parents.

Another easy option for BigPipe to add on there app toggles perhaps?

TBH, without some idea of how it's filtered, what's to say a DNS redirect or vpn won't easily break this "filter" leaving the technologically superior youth free to get up to mischief and the parents happily fooled into thinking they are safe?

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  Reply # 1605806 7-Aug-2016 13:04
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how does it work , would it block porn sites by the words entered or do they have a list of sites, Would it block a site like Pandamovie. [dont try it ] . because if not im pretty sure every teen will have that list of sites within days.





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  Reply # 1605808 7-Aug-2016 13:12
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If you have someone that knows about DNS, VPNs, etc then you need more than this obviously. You will need education, good parenting and steering the youngster in the direction of a tech career perhaps.





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  Reply # 1605810 7-Aug-2016 13:21
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freitasm:

 

If you have someone that knows about DNS, VPNs, etc then you need more than this obviously. You will need education, good parenting and steering the youngster in the direction of a tech career perhaps.

 

 

 

 

Damn right. And no doubt this is part of the "good parenting" bit -- no giving electronic devices to kids as some kind of over-aged pacifier and actually supervising and monitoring one's children's usage.

 

 

 

 




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  Reply # 1605815 7-Aug-2016 13:29
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All our devices at home have parental control enabled - the Amazon Fire TV needs a PIN to get into movies and TV series, laptops and tablets all have Norton Family installed with a strict one hour/day usage allowance. Our daughter has her own non-admin login in our laptops so that time limit is strictly enforced.





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  Reply # 1605817 7-Aug-2016 13:30
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I am against these filters. I think they are a dumb idea. They create a false sense of security for ignorant parents. They also impose the (usually inane) notions of the filter creators as to what is unacceptable kiddie viewing. I am certain any modern 10 year-olds with an IQ higher than the filter makers will have no problem at all installing Tor and viewing all the depraved content they like. Tor has become much more user-friendly and installation is a breeze. Once one 10 year-old has this information, it will soon get around. I agree completely that the solution for parents who truly want to protect their children is to talk to them, treat them with the respect that intelligent kids deserve, explain what is bad and why it is bad, win their confidence and give them a secure place to come for comfort when they do confront something upsetting that they do not understand. The answer is not to enclose them in a digital bubble, which doesn't work anyway.

 

  





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  Reply # 1605859 7-Aug-2016 14:05
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Actually, this looks like the sort of thing geo unblockers like dns4me and unotelly etc could add into their services.
They will have lost a bit of business with Netflix cracking down on geo unblocking recently, so you might think that adding content filtering might be a service they could perhaps look at. While i agree you can't absolutely stop determined people, you can make things difficult.

Though this actually reminds me of an issue I had at work during the past week. We set up some blocked firewall categories. We blocked 'proxies' as well. Tested fine on a laptop. Noticed android wasn't able to browse anything at all. Seems chrome on android now includes a data saving feature that is active by default. All traffic goes via a google proxy. Which we had blocked. The options are either to show everyone how to disable 'data saving' - so normal traffic filtering would apply, or allow googles proxy. Allowing googles proxy allows access to anything unrestricted. Can't win....




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  Reply # 1605883 7-Aug-2016 14:46
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robjg63: Actually, this looks like the sort of thing geo unblockers like dns4me and unotelly etc could add into their services.
They will have lost a bit of business with Netflix cracking down on geo unblocking recently, so you might think that adding content filtering might be a service they could perhaps look at.
Geo unblockers are about unrestricting access though.

 

 


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  Reply # 1605890 7-Aug-2016 14:54
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Rikkitic:

 

I am against these filters. I think they are a dumb idea. They create a false sense of security for ignorant parents. They also impose the (usually inane) notions of the filter creators as to what is unacceptable kiddie viewing. I am certain any modern 10 year-olds with an IQ higher than the filter makers will have no problem at all installing Tor and viewing all the depraved content they like. Tor has become much more user-friendly and installation is a breeze. Once one 10 year-old has this information, it will soon get around. I agree completely that the solution for parents who truly want to protect their children is to talk to them, treat them with the respect that intelligent kids deserve, explain what is bad and why it is bad, win their confidence and give them a secure place to come for comfort when they do confront something upsetting that they do not understand. The answer is not to enclose them in a digital bubble, which doesn't work anyway.

 

  

 

 

 

 

these tools are not intended really to stop capable kids who actually want to view this sort of stuff and try to get around the blocks. 

 

They are more designed for parents of younger kids who might view stuff accidentally via clicking an advert or pop-up, or searching for something apparently harmless on google that has another meaning in the pr0n industry e.g. BBC, Creampie, Facial.

 

 

 

 

 

Having said that, the most harmful stuff kids are going to come across is likely via social media IMHO - people sharing stuff on facebook, snapchat etc. And, from reading the press release, this does nothing to stop those sites.

 

 


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  Reply # 1605904 7-Aug-2016 15:23
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Jeesus, I don't even know what those terms mean! Don't think I want too, either. They sound positively scary. Except maybe BBC. That is nice and round and warm. I can see some value in filtering searches of the very young, but all the major search engines already do that by default. And as you point out, most of the bad stuff is likely to come from social media anyway. I just don't like these filter sites. They always make stupid judgments about what to screen and what to let through. They are just dumb. If you want to see what is banned in New Zealand, just think of all the filthy search terms you can and see what triggers the censor. Then go back and do the same searches with Tor. Thanks New Zealand censor for making that handy list for me.

 

 





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  Reply # 1606080 7-Aug-2016 21:05
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On balance, I favour something like this where parents can opt in and have control, which seems vastly preferable to hitting everyone with a mandatory then opt-out filter like the UK are doing. Having the account holder able to easily turn it on and off is a good thing too.

 

However, that being said, I doubt it will work, and share the concerns of another person that it might give non-technical parents a false sense of security.

 

Firstly, determined kids will defeat it.

 

Secondly, they don't have to defeat it. All it takes is one kid with unfiltered access and a USB stick (or DVD burner if their parents are old school, or even a printer), and anything they download will doubtlessly do the rounds at the school playground. Just like some kids used to take their dads nudie magazines to school and school camp when I was a nipper.

 

It may stop inadvertent access but that's about all. It won't stop kids with a serious interest, and certainly shouldn't be viewed as a substitute for keeping an eye on what they are up to and actually talking to them.


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Reply # 1606095 7-Aug-2016 21:32
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Rikkitic:

 

They sound positively scary. Except maybe BBC. That is nice and round and warm. 

 



I guess you're not far off... laughing


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