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895 posts

Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 1136578 24-Sep-2014 14:55
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portunus: Correct, it definitely was a class B when we got it, hence me calling it historical.




Which university?  I remember people at VUW complaining about the cost of bandwidth for all the internet background radiation that their class B recieved, back when I was a student (early-mid 2000s).

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Master Geek
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  Reply # 1136655 24-Sep-2014 15:46
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AUT - though we were a polytechnic (ATI) when the address space was first allocated.  I think all NZ unis and plenty of the polytechs have similar allocations...



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  Reply # 1136668 24-Sep-2014 15:47
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portunus: AUT - though we were a polytechnic (ATI) when the address space was first allocated.  I think all NZ unis and plenty of the polytechs have similar allocations...




when i was there.. i was actually pretty surprised at how much of their block they threw out there, instead of sticking to internal ips for machines that dont need it..




#include <std_disclaimer>

 

Any comments made are personal opinion and do not reflect directly on the position my current or past employers may have.


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  Reply # 1136675 24-Sep-2014 15:58
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In 1991 you could apply for IP address space even if you didn't intend to connect to the internet at that time.  Then if you did connect later you'd have your all your addresses ready.

That was how our (and many other NZ uni/polytech) networks evolved - NAT was pretty much unheard of at the time (why would you bother?).  Even now there wouldn't really be any benefit in renumbering - that effort could be much better spent on IPv6 or any other number of things.


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Geek
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  Reply # 1137213 25-Sep-2014 10:30
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So - can I migrate from a $99 Unlimited Home plan to a $109 Unlimited Business plan - and gain a static IP? 

Is there any way to keep the phone service that's provided as part of the Home plan?

And is global mode enabled on the business plans too?

Cheers,

Jeremy.

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  Reply # 1137275 25-Sep-2014 11:09
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jscriv: So - can I migrate from a $99 Unlimited Home plan to a $109 Unlimited Business plan - and gain a static IP?


Yes

jscriv: Is there any way to keep the phone service that's provided as part of the Home plan?


You should check with the sales team to confirm.

jscriv: And is global mode enabled on the business plans too?


No - Global Mode is enabled on residential accounts only.




Regards FireEngine


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Geek
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  Reply # 1137299 25-Sep-2014 11:29
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many thanks - now to weigh up the option!

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  Reply # 1137316 25-Sep-2014 11:36
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jscriv: many thanks - now to weigh up the option!


Ask the question in a few days :-)



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Geek
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  Reply # 1137336 25-Sep-2014 12:06
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OK, will do!

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Geek
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  Reply # 1143813 29-Sep-2014 20:52
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Too soon to ask again? ;-)

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  Reply # 1143851 29-Sep-2014 21:50
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jscriv: Too soon to ask again? ;-)


Yep, give it say just a couple of more days...




Regards FireEngine


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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 1143905 30-Sep-2014 04:22
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Sounddude: There are other reasons why we are keen on moving to dynamics, and that is its easy to change customer ranges , which is a requirement as we add BNG (Broadband Network Gateway) nodes up and down the country. We want as many customers served from a local IP pool. When more BNG's are added, customers get moved around and we want them to be from the new IP pool which is local to their regionalised BNG.

This then allows us to put CDN nodes (Google Cache, Akamai etc) in those regions also, serving the customers locally. Less latency and backhaul requirements means better service for the customer.

With Statics, they are served from a static IP pool, which ends up being served from CDN nodes in Auckland, regardless of BNG node.

Hope that makes sense :-)



I'm curious... do ISP's that have similar multiple caches around the country use the same public IP address at each place on the appliances? Or is that a big no no in IPv4 practise? It would save a couple of IP's here and there?

For example, I have a small Wi-Fi network and I was trying to figure out how to duplicate audio streaming on two different subnets instead of all from the one server without setting up two different DNS servers on each subnet with a different IP address for the two servers.

So I had one DNS server, that gave the same IP to clients on both subnets. Each subnet though had a streaming server with the same IP assigned. Only the routers on each subnet have a route to the server connected to it so traffic never traverses to the server on the other subnet. I had to put a second NIC in each server with a seperate private IP in order to get a single relay from server 1 to server 2 though.

Just wondered if CDN's do something similar to re-use IP addresses locally?

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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 1143943 30-Sep-2014 08:15
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kiwirock:

Just wondered if CDN's do something similar to re-use IP addresses locally?


It's called Anycast.  Google will tell you all about it.

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