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  Reply # 593418 11-Mar-2012 01:55
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lucky015:
Behodar: Right, but they'll cover the same percentage if they start at the "slow end" and work in the other direction.

Edit: I'm not suggesting that they cover tiny villages, etc. I mean that the same towns and cities already chosen for 75% coverage would still get it, but that the LFCs should begin by focussing on areas within that 75% that currently do not have access to VDSL2.


I imagine the logic behind the roll-out is the idea of starting with the highest density areas first, Where one cabinet connected means a lot more potential customers from the start, Also the speed the fibre can be laid at is a certain distance per hour meaning more densely populated areas mean more houses connected in the same period of time.


It's also possibly because the areas that already have fast connections likely already have fibre trunks running through or near them, meaning they're a logical place to start as they don't require running an 8km trench just to get started.

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  Reply # 593419 11-Mar-2012 01:58
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Kyanar:
lucky015:
Behodar: Right, but they'll cover the same percentage if they start at the "slow end" and work in the other direction.

Edit: I'm not suggesting that they cover tiny villages, etc. I mean that the same towns and cities already chosen for 75% coverage would still get it, but that the LFCs should begin by focussing on areas within that 75% that currently do not have access to VDSL2.


I imagine the logic behind the roll-out is the idea of starting with the highest density areas first, Where one cabinet connected means a lot more potential customers from the start, Also the speed the fibre can be laid at is a certain distance per hour meaning more densely populated areas mean more houses connected in the same period of time.


It's also possibly because the areas that already have fast connections likely already have fibre trunks running through or near them, meaning they're a logical place to start as they don't require running an 8km trench just to get started.


Ah, Yes I didn't think of that, The fibre would already be in place after the Fibre to the Node upgrade wouldn't it.

 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 593445 11-Mar-2012 10:01
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Behodar:
sbiddle: No mention of install pricing other than the mention of it varying depending on the property..

I've asked for a price, although I bet that it'll be horrendous for me due to topography, node location, etc. I'll post back once I hear something.

Just got a response (on a Sunday, no less!) and it looks like installation costs are still being worked on; I've been told that I'll need to wait a couple of months for pricing details. As noted in my earlier posts I'm a bit of a special case though so others may get results faster than that.

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  Reply # 593449 11-Mar-2012 10:11
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The plans are great, but as I said earlier they need something in the middle. 100GB is perhaps not enough for me, but 1TB is way too much.



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  Reply # 593452 11-Mar-2012 10:19
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Behodar:
Behodar:
sbiddle: No mention of install pricing other than the mention of it varying depending on the property..

I've asked for a price, although I bet that it'll be horrendous for me due to topography, node location, etc. I'll post back once I hear something.

Just got a response (on a Sunday, no less!) and it looks like installation costs are still being worked on; I've been told that I'll need to wait a couple of months for pricing details. As noted in my earlier posts I'm a bit of a special case though so others may get results faster than that.

"There are no connection charges for households in the ultra-fast broadband areas."

http://www.med.govt.nz/sectors-industries/technology-communication/fast-broadband/ultra-fast-broadband-initiative/faqs#costs 

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  Reply # 594183 12-Mar-2012 15:24
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lucky015:
Behodar: Right, but they'll cover the same percentage if they start at the "slow end" and work in the other direction.

Edit: I'm not suggesting that they cover tiny villages, etc. I mean that the same towns and cities already chosen for 75% coverage would still get it, but that the LFCs should begin by focusing on areas within that 75% that currently do not have access to VDSL2.


I imagine the logic behind the roll-out is the idea of starting with the highest density areas first, Where one cabinet connected means a lot more potential customers from the start, Also the speed the fibre can be laid at is a certain distance per hour meaning more densely populated areas mean more houses connected in the same period of time.



If that's the case then why are they doing business areas here hawks bay first they're obviously not "High Density" area here as you can see from the Chorus map pic I put up there's far more denser area's than sodding Onekawa Industrial oh I know why it's because they're High cash areas

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Reply # 594193 12-Mar-2012 15:30
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Athlonite:
lucky015:
Behodar: Right, but they'll cover the same percentage if they start at the "slow end" and work in the other direction.

Edit: I'm not suggesting that they cover tiny villages, etc. I mean that the same towns and cities already chosen for 75% coverage would still get it, but that the LFCs should begin by focusing on areas within that 75% that currently do not have access to VDSL2.


I imagine the logic behind the roll-out is the idea of starting with the highest density areas first, Where one cabinet connected means a lot more potential customers from the start, Also the speed the fibre can be laid at is a certain distance per hour meaning more densely populated areas mean more houses connected in the same period of time.



If that's the case then why are they doing business areas here hawks bay first they're obviously not "High Density" area here as you can see from the Chorus map pic I put up there's far more denser area's than sodding Onekawa Industrial oh I know why it's because they're High cash areas

Ultra Fast Business?
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  Reply # 594195 12-Mar-2012 15:41
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codyc1515:
Behodar:
Behodar:
sbiddle: No mention of install pricing other than the mention of it varying depending on the property..

I've asked for a price, although I bet that it'll be horrendous for me due to topography, node location, etc. I'll post back once I hear something.

Just got a response (on a Sunday, no less!) and it looks like installation costs are still being worked on; I've been told that I'll need to wait a couple of months for pricing details. As noted in my earlier posts I'm a bit of a special case though so others may get results faster than that.

"There are no connection charges for households in the ultra-fast broadband areas."

http://www.med.govt.nz/sectors-industries/technology-communication/fast-broadband/ultra-fast-broadband-initiative/faqs#costs 




"Free installation" covers a standard drop/trenching of a maximum distance (15m from memory, I'd have to read the Chorus documents to confirm this) to the ONT. It does not cover any ancillary costs such as power at the location of the ONT, and/or instalaltion of your GRW/router and/or modification of your existing phone wiring to the ATA.

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  Reply # 594197 12-Mar-2012 15:43
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sbiddle:
codyc1515:
Behodar:
Behodar:
sbiddle: No mention of install pricing other than the mention of it varying depending on the property..

I've asked for a price, although I bet that it'll be horrendous for me due to topography, node location, etc. I'll post back once I hear something.

Just got a response (on a Sunday, no less!) and it looks like installation costs are still being worked on; I've been told that I'll need to wait a couple of months for pricing details. As noted in my earlier posts I'm a bit of a special case though so others may get results faster than that.

"There are no connection charges for households in the ultra-fast broadband areas."

http://www.med.govt.nz/sectors-industries/technology-communication/fast-broadband/ultra-fast-broadband-initiative/faqs#costs 




"Free installation" covers a standard drop/trenching of a maximum distance (15m from memory, I'd have to read the Chorus documents to confirm this) to the ONT. It does not cover any ancillary costs such as power at the location of the ONT, and/or instalaltion of your GRW/router and/or modification of your existing phone wiring to the ATA.

Ah, OK, thanks for clarifying that :D

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  Reply # 594198 12-Mar-2012 15:45
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sbiddle: "Free installation" covers a standard drop/trenching of a maximum distance (15m from memory, I'd have to read the Chorus documents to confirm this) to the ONT. It does not cover any ancillary costs such as power at the location of the ONT, and/or instalaltion of your GRW/router and/or modification of your existing phone wiring to the ATA.

It's much further than 15 m for me so I'm fully expecting to have to pay for it and I don't begrudge Chorus/Orcon for it. Once the cable reaches the house it should be trivial (it comes into the garage and is easily accessible) but the trick is getting it to my house in the first place :)

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  Reply # 594209 12-Mar-2012 16:08
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Behodar:
sbiddle: "Free installation" covers a standard drop/trenching of a maximum distance (15m from memory, I'd have to read the Chorus documents to confirm this) to the ONT. It does not cover any ancillary costs such as power at the location of the ONT, and/or instalaltion of your GRW/router and/or modification of your existing phone wiring to the ATA.

It's much further than 15 m for me so I'm fully expecting to have to pay for it and I don't begrudge Chorus/Orcon for it. Once the cable reaches the house it should be trivial (it comes into the garage and is easily accessible) but the trick is getting it to my house in the first place :)


Why not dig a trench for them yourself from the Mushroom to the side of the house (to their specification its somewhere on the site). They can then lay the conduit and put the fibre cable in? How old is your house?  It may already have conduit in which case they can just pull the cable through using the existing copper. 





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  Reply # 594215 12-Mar-2012 16:25
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Again, I am using some super secret documentation* and can reveal the current Chorus terms for a standard installation. Please don't ask me to reveal my sources. **

The Bitstream 3a Service includes a Standard Install as set out below (in each case to the extent that the relevant provisioning works are not already complete for the relevant Service Order).

Provisioning at Single Dwelling Unit End User?s Premises
3.1.1 A Standard Install for the Bitstream 3a Service to a Single Dwelling Unit includes:
(a) a Fibre Lead-in from the Fibre Access Point to an ETP at the closest convenient point on the End User Premises, as agreed with End User, where the Fibre Lead-in utilises no more than:
(i) 100m of approved conduit or open trench (already in place at the time of installation); or
(ii) a single span of aerial drop lead (available only in areas where there is overhead deployment); or
(iii) 15m of buried lead-in (available only in areas where there is underground deployment); and
(b) an extension of the Fibre Lead-in up to 5m from the ETP (there will not necessarily be a break in the Fibre Lead-in at the ETP) to:
(i) a suitable mounted SC/APC connector at a secure location inside the End User Premises; or
(ii) if there is an OFDF beyond the ETP, a splice or LCA connector on the OFDF.
3.1.2 The LFC will provide Non-Standard Installs for the Bitstream 3a Service to Single Dwelling Units as an ancillary service.


Cheers - N.

* - It's not secret, it's publically available.
** - It's on the CFH site, available for anyone that wants to learn more.

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  Reply # 594216 12-Mar-2012 16:28
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Zeon: Why not dig a trench for them yourself from the Mushroom to the side of the house (to their specification its somewhere on the site). They can then lay the conduit and put the fibre cable in? How old is your house?  It may already have conduit in which case they can just pull the cable through using the existing copper. 

After rereading my existing posts I see that I somehow managed to leave out a fairly critical piece of information! My street is a "UFB street" but there currently isn't any fibre, and published timetables show it 4-5 years away. The information that I've requested from Orcon is around how much I'd need to pay to get it installed "now" (such as by the end of the year). I know that I've posted that before, but I must've put it in another thread because I now see that it's not in this one!

It'll be interesting to see what prices Chorus/Orcon come back with. It could be a full installation charge complete with 1.3 km of cable back to the cabinet, or it could be less than that on the basis that it's Government-funded and would still go in eventually. The cost could also could be split with the neighbours because a few of them are interested.

Short version: I don't want to go trenching the street myself :)

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  Reply # 594229 12-Mar-2012 16:37
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The Bitstream 3a Service includes a Standard Install as set out below (in each case to the extent that the relevant provisioning works are not already complete for the relevant Service Order).

Provisioning at Single Dwelling Unit End User?s Premises
3.1.1 A Standard Install for the Bitstream 3a Service to a Single Dwelling Unit includes:
(a) a Fibre Lead-in from the Fibre Access Point to an ETP at the closest convenient point on the End User Premises, as agreed with End User, where the Fibre Lead-in utilises no more than:
(i) 100m of approved conduit or open trench (already in place at the time of installation); or
(ii) a single span of aerial drop lead (available only in areas where there is overhead deployment); or
(iii) 15m of buried lead-in (available only in areas where there is underground deployment); and
(b) an extension of the Fibre Lead-in up to 5m from the ETP (there will not necessarily be a break in the Fibre Lead-in at the ETP) to:
(i) a suitable mounted SC/APC connector at a secure location inside the End User Premises; or
(ii) if there is an OFDF beyond the ETP, a splice or LCA connector on the OFDF.
3.1.2 The LFC will provide Non-Standard Installs for the Bitstream 3a Service to Single Dwelling Units as an ancillary service.



the first part (a) sounds quite reasonable. It should ocver the majority of houses I would think.

However the second part (b) sounds pretty weak if I understand it right. It seems to basically be referring to how much wiring they are willing to place in your house to get the fibre from the point where it enters your house (which will be the closest point to the road) to wherever you want your ONT. Is that right?

If so, 5m is pretty tiny. If the wiring needs to go in the roof then 5m will barely cover going up to the roof cavity and back down again for a single story house with standard roof height. If the ETP needs to be right at the front of your house, and they are only willing to put 5m of cabling in your house, then that means people are going to be pretty restricted to where their gas heater (sorry, I mean ONT) is going to go.
If I want a free install then this means I will basically have to put my ONT in my 2 year old daughter's room which seems rather undesirable. If I wanted to make the extra wiring, say, 20m to get the ONT to a more suitable place like my garage or halway cupboard, then I will have to pay. Not too bad if it is just for the extra materials, but if it is going to be a few hundred bucks then I won't be upgrading anytiem soon.

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  Reply # 594241 12-Mar-2012 16:56
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I'm a great support of the ONT being external, but many others don't share this view.

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