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Topic # 123204 28-Jun-2013 11:05
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So i would like freeview in each of my rooms, 3 bedrooms and one in the lounge. Can anyone please give me some ideas on the best setup or links to companies that may look at my house and tell me what i need (Quote). 




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  Reply # 846647 28-Jun-2013 11:07
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Where in NZ are you? (Standing joke is it's likely Auckland?)

Are you in a freeview HD/UHF/Terrestrial reception area?

Do your TV's have freeview built in or will you be needing set top boxes etc?

Do you want to record TV at all?

Do you want to be able to watch different channels on each TV at the same time?

A bit more information will help us to help you.



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  Reply # 846658 28-Jun-2013 11:29
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Sorry should have noted this down

All LED/LCD tv's with freeview built in. Live in UpperHutt Wellington, dont want to record anything just watch tv when i want to.




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  Reply # 846662 28-Jun-2013 11:32
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Basically, assuming you are in an area that can receive the Freeview UHF signal, you just need an antenna feed to each location you want a TV.

This will require a decent UHF antenna on your roof, and a splitter and 4 runs of RG6 (1 to each room) off the splitter.

That is the most basic, and will get you 4 independent TVs running on freeview.

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  Reply # 846723 28-Jun-2013 13:02
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If you are in a residential area, a decent indoor antenna should be enough. Friends and family rubbish out saying indoors antennas are crap - true for analog but digital signals are better quality



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  Reply # 846829 28-Jun-2013 17:10
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trig42: Basically, assuming you are in an area that can receive the Freeview UHF signal, you just need an antenna feed to each location you want a TV.

This will require a decent UHF antenna on your roof, and a splitter and 4 runs of RG6 (1 to each room) off the splitter.

That is the most basic, and will get you 4 independent TVs running on freeview.



i was looking at doing this, but i have read that this can cause signal lose. True?




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  Reply # 846841 28-Jun-2013 17:34
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waikariboy:
trig42: Basically, assuming you are in an area that can receive the Freeview UHF signal, you just need an antenna feed to each location you want a TV.

This will require a decent UHF antenna on your roof, and a splitter and 4 runs of RG6 (1 to each room) off the splitter.

That is the most basic, and will get you 4 independent TVs running on freeview.



i was looking at doing this, but i have read that this can cause signal lose. True?


Depending on exactly how good the signal from the transmitter is when it reaches your aerial you may need an amplifier connected between the aerial and the four way splitter. If you have a good strong signal you may not need any amplification.

If you do need an amplifier it doesn't make the job that much more complicated, and doesn't add that much to the overall cost of the job either.

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  Reply # 846860 28-Jun-2013 19:29
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khull: If you are in a residential area, a decent indoor antenna should be enough. Friends and family rubbish out saying indoors antennas are crap - true for analog but digital signals are better quality


The perceived quality of displayed image after decoding has really no relation whatsoever to the strength or quality of the transmitted signal and whether it can be received via an indoor antenna. None at all.

And how do you define a decent indoor antenna??

I can't receive any mux 16 kms from a 47 dBW transmitter in my house with an indoor antenna and that is in Christchurch with the transmitter being visible from the roof line.




Ross

 

Spark FibreMAX using Mikrotik CCR1009-8G-1S-1S+

 


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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 847304 30-Jun-2013 08:46
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Deev8:
waikariboy:
trig42: Basically, assuming you are in an area that can receive the Freeview UHF signal, you just need an antenna feed to each location you want a TV.

This will require a decent UHF antenna on your roof, and a splitter and 4 runs of RG6 (1 to each room) off the splitter.

That is the most basic, and will get you 4 independent TVs running on freeview.



i was looking at doing this, but i have read that this can cause signal lose. True?


Depending on exactly how good the signal from the transmitter is when it reaches your aerial you may need an amplifier connected between the aerial and the four way splitter. If you have a good strong signal you may not need any amplification.

If you do need an amplifier it doesn't make the job that much more complicated, and doesn't add that much to the overall cost of the job either.



Cheers for the info. What i am also concerned about is the aerial i have outside, is there a cheap device i can buy to first this the signal with the aerial i have a then go from there?

ATM i have one cable upstair in my room that i cant get any digital channels from and only some analog channels on it. Im guessing the cables need replacing?




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  Reply # 847306 30-Jun-2013 08:58
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waikariboy:
Deev8:
waikariboy:
trig42: Basically, assuming you are in an area that can receive the Freeview UHF signal, you just need an antenna feed to each location you want a TV.

This will require a decent UHF antenna on your roof, and a splitter and 4 runs of RG6 (1 to each room) off the splitter.

That is the most basic, and will get you 4 independent TVs running on freeview.



i was looking at doing this, but i have read that this can cause signal lose. True?


Depending on exactly how good the signal from the transmitter is when it reaches your aerial you may need an amplifier connected between the aerial and the four way splitter. If you have a good strong signal you may not need any amplification.

If you do need an amplifier it doesn't make the job that much more complicated, and doesn't add that much to the overall cost of the job either.



Cheers for the info. What i am also concerned about is the aerial i have outside, is there a cheap device i can buy to first this the signal with the aerial i have a then go from there?

ATM i have one cable upstair in my room that i cant get any digital channels from and only some analog channels on it. Im guessing the cables need replacing?


What kind of aerial do you have on the roof that's connected to this cable?
Do you have freeview elsewhere in the house thats connected to the same aerial?  
Are you sure this cable in your room connects to an aerial (or was it once being fed from another room)?



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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 847671 1-Jul-2013 12:55
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So i went around the house, 

Lounge - Doesn't get Analog TV very well, but Digital TV is working great.

Have a cable in my room, Analog TV isnt very good (useless really), and no Digital TV. After doing some research outside (i live in a two store flat) we have two cables into the one aerial. Im guessing the cable into my room needs cleaned up. I think it would be best to split my cable into the other rooms?




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