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jeffnz
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  #928467 7-Nov-2013 07:16
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Smart TV's are only in their infancy, it won't be long before we just have a screen on the wall that is a computer, TV, media centre etc etc with tablets connected to them.

I'm guessing they are slowing the technology as it will do away with so many devices when they finally decide to do them so sales will plummet.

I've had a media PC for years but recently looking to move away from that to maybe a laptop or smarter TV but hace as yet to see anything that is better than what I have for functionality. I'm keeping an eye on the Android TV sticks as they seem a step in the right direction but still think a TV with everything built in is the way to go.




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JimmyH
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  #929046 7-Nov-2013 19:57
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I want my TV to be a screen, and just a screen, period. Lots of inputs and a good picture is what I look for. I don't look at "smart" features at all when buying.

I far prefer a modular solution to a very expensive "all-in-one" kludge. Even a cheap sound system will beat a TV's inbuilt speakers. A dedicated media player (or connecting my laptop) will beat probably any inbult smarts now, and be much easier to upgrade in future.

I would rather spend $2,300 on a TV with a good picture and loads of inputs, than $3,000 on the same TV with "smart" features etc. Even if adding the media player and a sound system costs significantly more than the $700 difference. This is because I can then upgrade in parts. I don't want to be cursing a $3,000 TV that now seems to be a clunky "white elephant" because TV smarts have improved in the last 12 months, nor do I want to junk a $3,000 TV for the same reason. However, it's reasonably palatable to pension off a $150-250 media player (especially as I can move it to the TV in the bedroom or spare room) and get a new one if feature sets have advanced.

In any event, I can't ever see myself wanting to surf the internet on my TV. Clunky and horrible. If I need to do that in the living room I can use my tablet or laptop, and use the DLNA function if I want to throw a stream I'm watching onto the TV.

I will pay extra for a TV to get a good picture, more HDMI inputs, and legacy input options (AV, component, VGA etc). I won't pay more for smart features.

reven
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  #929190 7-Nov-2013 23:25
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JimmyH: I want my TV to be a screen, and just a screen, period. Lots of inputs and a good picture is what I look for. I don't look at "smart" features at all when buying.

I far prefer a modular solution to a very expensive "all-in-one" kludge. Even a cheap sound system will beat a TV's inbuilt speakers. A dedicated media player (or connecting my laptop) will beat probably any inbult smarts now, and be much easier to upgrade in future.

I would rather spend $2,300 on a TV with a good picture and loads of inputs, than $3,000 on the same TV with "smart" features etc. Even if adding the media player and a sound system costs significantly more than the $700 difference. This is because I can then upgrade in parts. I don't want to be cursing a $3,000 TV that now seems to be a clunky "white elephant" because TV smarts have improved in the last 12 months, nor do I want to junk a $3,000 TV for the same reason. However, it's reasonably palatable to pension off a $150-250 media player (especially as I can move it to the TV in the bedroom or spare room) and get a new one if feature sets have advanced.

In any event, I can't ever see myself wanting to surf the internet on my TV. Clunky and horrible. If I need to do that in the living room I can use my tablet or laptop, and use the DLNA function if I want to throw a stream I'm watching onto the TV.

I will pay extra for a TV to get a good picture, more HDMI inputs, and legacy input options (AV, component, VGA etc). I won't pay more for smart features.


the beauty of an actual smart tv, not just youtube/browser, is the integration.  the best and easiest way ive ever used netflix is via the samsung tv app.  I dont need to fire up any other device, I dont need an additional controller/remote/universal remote.  its all working on the standard tv remote that came with it, its super quick and easy to use.  I can pump the sound from the tv apps into my receiver using ARC so only need the single HDMI cable between tv and receiver; I can control the sound of the receiver via my tvs remote, so I dont need the receiver remote unless I want to use the xbox or listen to music.

if youre using a htpc, or if you're using netflix, I really cant recommend a good smart tv enough, they can completely replace your HTPC and give you a much better solution.  smart tvs arent always that expensive, my brother got a 46" led samsung on sale for $1000, he didnt buy it for smart tv and had no clue that it could do all the things it could until I showed him.  I got a 55" 2013 3D led samsung for $2200 i think and a 50" (same model diff size) for around $1700.    

The quality of the apps, I wont upgrade again for another 3 years and I might pickup a 32" one if the boxing day sales are good.

2012 samsung == meh, a little slow
2013 samsung == better than a HTPC IMO.



Apsattv
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  #929213 8-Nov-2013 03:33
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and the Samsungs can be upgraded using their evolution kits





 


geek4me
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  #929309 8-Nov-2013 11:20
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If you buy a Smart TV buy a cheaper model. I bought an internet connecting 42 inch smart LCD LG TV for just under $1,000 a year ago. There were plenty of more expensive ones at the time with 55 or 65 inch screens which reacted to hand movements and voice commands that cost 3 to 5 times the price. I was advised that Smart TVs are still in their infancy a bit like PCs were when Windows 98 or 2000 ran on them. They were better than Windows 95 but look what's happened since. I was told buy a cheaper smart TV and in a few years you replace it with another cheap smart TV with its up to date features and do the same a few years later.

This way you will have spent no more than the cost of a fancy smart TV today but have a 3rd new TV in 2018 which will be up to date. Like a PC running Windows 7 or 8 instead of Windows 2000 (today's Smart TV equivalent) in terms of features and performance.

LesF
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  #929478 8-Nov-2013 14:54
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I got a semi-smart Samsung from a few days before they added any smart functionality, it seems.
There was a hint at being able to update the system online but as far as I can tell they have never released any kind of update for this model. Would be interesting to find out what hardware this semi-smart interface runs on and if it could take an upgrade.

I added a [expensive Samsung] wireless dongle thing and can play media from my pooter via DLNA services, which was all very nifty, but the wifi connectivity is poor either on the Samsung tv or on my router, haven't tried to diagnose further, but have not had problems with any other devices connecting to my wifi.

I have a small Android media player plugged directly into a HDMI plug on the back of the tv now, and get some viewing pleasure using standard apps on it. Also use the media player's wifi now for accessing my media library as it is much more reliable than the Samsung dongle/tv setup.

Personally I would be quite happy with a basic ARM based Android system built in to a tv, provided it came with a decent airmouse/keyboard.

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