Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.




1863 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 36

Trusted

# 175489 1-Jul-2015 13:33
Send private message

We can't get HD Freeview due to our location (down a hill).

Is there a reason why Freeview HD isn't offered over a dish?

View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
 1 | 2
2078 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 230

Subscriber

  # 1335014 1-Jul-2015 13:45
Send private message

Simple - Money.

Setting up SD over satellite is cheaper.  HD is possible but uses up more satellite bandwidth, more expensive set top boxes etc

Fat bottom Trump
10197 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 5021

Lifetime subscriber

  # 1335093 1-Jul-2015 14:43
Send private message

Money is the answer. How steep is that hill of yours? At UHF frequencies, signals tend to bounce around and they do bend a little so you don't need strict line of sight. Where we are we are surrounded by hills and since digital tends to be all or nothing we had no reception with the aerial at normal height above the roof but perfect reception just 3 metres higher. It depends on a lot of variables but might be worth a try if you feel like experimenting and really want it badly enough. A hi-gain antenna also helps.
 




I reject your reality and substitute my own. - Adam Savage
 


 
 
 
 


27978 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 7461

Moderator
Trusted
Biddle Corp
Lifetime subscriber

  # 1335255 1-Jul-2015 18:19
One person supports this post
Send private message

It's not just about money.

Freeview is now over 8 years old, with decisions about the technology it should use being made before it even launched. Some of these decisions were technical and forced on Freeview (such as transponder space available on D1), while some such as STB capabilities did factor in financial inputs.

DVB-S2 was in it's infancy in 2007 with very few STB options available. Opting for S2 would have meant replacing every STB that was already in use before Freeview launched. Some tough decisions were also made about the DVB-T platform as well where the decision was made to launch with DVB-T and H.264 which meant there was very limited STB options available, but this was the best decision going forward.




1863 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 36

Trusted

  # 1335270 1-Jul-2015 18:53
Send private message

Rikkitic: Money is the answer. How steep is that hill of yours? At UHF frequencies, signals tend to bounce around and they do bend a little so you don't need strict line of sight. Where we are we are surrounded by hills and since digital tends to be all or nothing we had no reception with the aerial at normal height above the roof but perfect reception just 3 metres higher. It depends on a lot of variables but might be worth a try if you feel like experimenting and really want it badly enough. A hi-gain antenna also helps.
 


I live in Hillcrest on the North Shore. We've tried install UHF aerials but just can't get a good signal. Neighbors have the same issues.

Fibre coming in 2 years so will wait for that and get Vodafone TV :)

1682 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 410

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  # 1335271 1-Jul-2015 19:01
Send private message

The problem is that sky has the lease on a good portion of the transponder on the satellite, with the available space left and the number of  channels freeview want to offer there just isn't the bandwidth for HD channels.



1863 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 36

Trusted

  # 1335282 1-Jul-2015 19:07
Send private message

Its a shame because if they did offer HD over Sat, then they wouldn't need to bother with two different connection types. Everything could be provided to a dish and the consumer can decide whether they buy an SD or HD decoder.

Maybe one day it will change? Let's put our own dish out into orbit?? Can't Rocket Lab do it on the cheap?? :)

1682 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 410

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  # 1335301 1-Jul-2015 19:34
Send private message

simon14: Its a shame because if they did offer HD over Sat, then they wouldn't need to bother with two different connection types. Everything could be provided to a dish and the consumer can decide whether they buy an SD or HD decoder.

Maybe one day it will change? Let's put our own dish out into orbit?? Can't Rocket Lab do it on the cheap?? :)


Good idea, just need $100 million launch your own and either ask everyone who has a satellite dish to point their dish a different way or get the current satellite out of the way, back to reality it's not going to happen, freeview satellite was really just a stop gap until the analogue-T system got turned off and people moved to DVB-T

 
 
 
 




1863 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 36

Trusted

  # 1335304 1-Jul-2015 19:38
Send private message

DVB-T isnt avialable everywhere whereas satellite basically is.

Will they be phasing out sat delivery of freeview over time?

8655 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2977

Lifetime subscriber

  # 1335310 1-Jul-2015 19:48
Send private message

simon14:
Rikkitic: Money is the answer. How steep is that hill of yours? At UHF frequencies, signals tend to bounce around and they do bend a little so you don't need strict line of sight. Where we are we are surrounded by hills and since digital tends to be all or nothing we had no reception with the aerial at normal height above the roof but perfect reception just 3 metres higher. It depends on a lot of variables but might be worth a try if you feel like experimenting and really want it badly enough. A hi-gain antenna also helps.
 


I live in Hillcrest on the North Shore. We've tried install UHF aerials but just can't get a good signal. Neighbors have the same issues.

Fibre coming in 2 years so will wait for that and get Vodafone TV :)


have you tried a phased array aerial? they are a lot better for weaker signal areas

also try this site
http://www.matchmaster.net.nz/

You're typing with Josh!
1410 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 143

Trusted
Subscriber

  # 1335315 1-Jul-2015 19:53
One person supports this post
Send private message

gregmcc: The problem is that sky has the lease on a good portion of the transponder on the satellite, with the available space left and the number of  channels freeview want to offer there just isn't the bandwidth for HD channels.


All TVNZ and TV3 need to do is unlock their HD feeds and get DVBS2 receivers to collect the channels like they do for Four Plus 1, Edge TV and Prime. Just a matter of SKY and Freeview negotiating with broadcasters to do this.

There is no need to launch new HD versions of TV One, TV2 and TV3 on the Korida Transponders.




Currently working with Freeview NZ and Owner of Tech Plus Services Limited
Former Consultant at Spark New Zealand Trading Limited, DISH TV Technologies. 


1682 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 410

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  # 1335316 1-Jul-2015 19:57
2 people support this post
Send private message

joshhill96:
gregmcc: The problem is that sky has the lease on a good portion of the transponder on the satellite, with the available space left and the number of  channels freeview want to offer there just isn't the bandwidth for HD channels.


All TVNZ and TV3 need to do is unlock their HD feeds and get DVBS2 receivers to collect the channels like they do for Four Plus 1, Edge TV and Prime. Just a matter of SKY and Freeview negotiating with broadcasters to do this.  


Problem is why would sky help out their competition? It's to sky's advantage to keep their customers locked to their platform no matter what channel, unscramble the FTA channels and there is no reason to stay with sky

27978 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 7461

Moderator
Trusted
Biddle Corp
Lifetime subscriber

  # 1335333 1-Jul-2015 20:16
Send private message

simon14: Its a shame because if they did offer HD over Sat, then they wouldn't need to bother with two different connection types. Everything could be provided to a dish and the consumer can decide whether they buy an SD or HD decoder.

Maybe one day it will change? Let's put our own dish out into orbit?? Can't Rocket Lab do it on the cheap?? :)


Satellite isn't available everywhere either - while it does offer pretty much 100% coverage there are still plenty of people that due to their exact location and obstacles such as buildings and trees who can't get a satellite connection. It's ultimate goal is infill in areas where there is no DVB-T, not as a primary platform.

Why should everybody be forced to buy a decoder? The goal should be IDTV, and the global market for DVB-S based IDTV is very small.





1863 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 36

Trusted

  # 1335336 1-Jul-2015 20:20
Send private message

sbiddle:
simon14: Its a shame because if they did offer HD over Sat, then they wouldn't need to bother with two different connection types. Everything could be provided to a dish and the consumer can decide whether they buy an SD or HD decoder.

Maybe one day it will change? Let's put our own dish out into orbit?? Can't Rocket Lab do it on the cheap?? :)


Satellite isn't available everywhere either - while it does offer pretty much 100% coverage there are still plenty of people that due to their exact location and obstacles such as buildings and trees who can't get a satellite connection. It's ultimate goal is infill in areas where there is no DVB-T, not as a primary platform.

Why should everybody be forced to buy a decoder? The goal should be IDTV, and the global market for DVB-S based IDTV is very small.




Ultimately it should all be done over the internet... fibre is the future :)

Then those out of fibre coverage can go off DVB-T,

3117 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 335

Subscriber

  # 1335339 1-Jul-2015 20:29
Send private message

simon14:
sbiddle:
simon14: Its a shame because if they did offer HD over Sat, then they wouldn't need to bother with two different connection types. Everything could be provided to a dish and the consumer can decide whether they buy an SD or HD decoder.

Maybe one day it will change? Let's put our own dish out into orbit?? Can't Rocket Lab do it on the cheap?? :)


Satellite isn't available everywhere either - while it does offer pretty much 100% coverage there are still plenty of people that due to their exact location and obstacles such as buildings and trees who can't get a satellite connection. It's ultimate goal is infill in areas where there is no DVB-T, not as a primary platform.

Why should everybody be forced to buy a decoder? The goal should be IDTV, and the global market for DVB-S based IDTV is very small.




Ultimately it should all be done over the internet... fibre is the future :)

Then those out of fibre coverage can go off DVB-T,


And those with no fibre and no DVB-T coverage??!!

27978 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 7461

Moderator
Trusted
Biddle Corp
Lifetime subscriber

  # 1335344 1-Jul-2015 20:34
Send private message

simon14:
sbiddle:
simon14: Its a shame because if they did offer HD over Sat, then they wouldn't need to bother with two different connection types. Everything could be provided to a dish and the consumer can decide whether they buy an SD or HD decoder.

Maybe one day it will change? Let's put our own dish out into orbit?? Can't Rocket Lab do it on the cheap?? :)


Satellite isn't available everywhere either - while it does offer pretty much 100% coverage there are still plenty of people that due to their exact location and obstacles such as buildings and trees who can't get a satellite connection. It's ultimate goal is infill in areas where there is no DVB-T, not as a primary platform.

Why should everybody be forced to buy a decoder? The goal should be IDTV, and the global market for DVB-S based IDTV is very small.




Ultimately it should all be done over the internet... fibre is the future :)

Then those out of fibre coverage can go off DVB-T,


It's easy to do over fibre - RFoF is supported on the UFB network and would simply require swapping out the ONT for an RF capable one.

The decision was made at the time to not deploy RFoF however, as many saw it as a dead end solution with the move away from linear DVB based broadcasting.



 1 | 2
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic



Twitter and LinkedIn »



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:





News »

Dunedin selects Telensa to deliver smart street lighting for 15,000 LEDs
Posted 18-Jul-2019 10:21


Sprint announces a connected wallet card with built-in IoT support
Posted 18-Jul-2019 08:36


Educational tool developed at Otago makes international launch
Posted 17-Jul-2019 21:57


Symantec introduces cloud access security solution
Posted 17-Jul-2019 21:48


New Zealand government unveils new digital service to make business easier
Posted 16-Jul-2019 17:35


Scientists unveil image of quantum entanglement
Posted 13-Jul-2019 06:00


Hackers to be challenged at University of Waikato
Posted 12-Jul-2019 21:34


OPPO Reno Z now available in New Zealand
Posted 12-Jul-2019 21:28


Sony introduces WF-1000XM3 wireless headphones with noise cancellation
Posted 8-Jul-2019 16:56


Xero announces new smarter tools, push into the North American market
Posted 19-Jun-2019 17:20


New report by Unisys shows New Zealanders want action by social platform companies and police to monitor social media sites
Posted 19-Jun-2019 17:09


ASB adds Google Pay option to contactless payments
Posted 19-Jun-2019 17:05


New Zealand PC Market declines on the back of high channel inventory, IDC reports
Posted 18-Jun-2019 17:35


Air New Zealand uses drones to inspect aircraft
Posted 17-Jun-2019 15:39


TCL Electronics launches its first-ever 8K TV
Posted 17-Jun-2019 15:18



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.


Support Geekzone »

Our community of supporters help make Geekzone possible. Click the button below to join them.

Support Geezone on PressPatron



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.