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Topic # 96866 5-Feb-2012 15:53
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I need to run two TV's off one UHF aerial for Freeview.  One TV is connected to a TiVo box and the other has Freeview built in. The UHF terminates in the dining room, and the other TV is in the living room. Obviously I will need a splitter to run cable from dining to living, but will there be much loss in signal, or would I need some sort of booster? 

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  Reply # 577579 5-Feb-2012 15:57
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If it is far away, then an amplifier will boost the signal.




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  Reply # 577580 5-Feb-2012 15:59
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Splitter is a good idea, you need to check that the splitter handles RF (DVB-T) frequencies as some handle satallite (DVB-S) frequencies only and some handle both.

The amount of signal loss is also dependant on the type of cable you already have in place, the length, and how good the signal is.

You may have to invest in a signal booster, you may not, only way to tell is to put your splitter in, use RG6 cable to your new outlet, try and keep the run as direct as possible.

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  Reply # 577591 5-Feb-2012 16:50
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gregmcc: Splitter is a good idea, you need to check that the splitter handles RF (DVB-T) frequencies as some handle satallite (DVB-S) frequencies only and some handle both.

The amount of signal loss is also dependant on the type of cable you already have in place, the length, and how good the signal is.

You may have to invest in a signal booster, you may not, only way to tell is to put your splitter in, use RG6 cable to your new outlet, try and keep the run as direct as possible.



Correct me if im wrong, but if a splitter can pass DVBS it will pass DVBT but not visa versa  as UHF is 5-900MHz and IF is 5 - 2050




 

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  Reply # 577595 5-Feb-2012 17:00
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Try everything without an amplifier first. If the signal is too weak, then get a masthead amplifier that you can put on the antenna mast to be hooked up just after the UHF aerial.

A masthead amplifier is almost always better than an amplifier that goes at the TV end, as you would be amplifying a more degraded signal at the TV end. Always better to amplify a good signal as close to the source (UHF aerial) as possible.



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  Reply # 577609 5-Feb-2012 17:55
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The other I could try is something like this
http://www.jaycar.co.nz/productView.asp?ID=LT3131&form=CAT2&SUBCATID=1016#4

But has anyone tried something like this and compared to an outdoor antenna, how does it stack up?

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  Reply # 577641 5-Feb-2012 19:40
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I use one of these to split the antenna coax to two rooms.

http://www.jaycar.co.nz/productView.asp?ID=LT3046&keywords=splitter&form=KEYWORD

Works perfectly.


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