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BDFL - Memuneh
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  Reply # 790811 2-Apr-2013 16:12
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Just received:


2degrees – business will continue as recovery takes place

The 2degrees Board met today in Auckland to acknowledge the loss of Eric and Kathy Hertz, review support for their families and 2degrees staff and address issues of interim leadership.

Chairman Stewart Sherriff and Board member Brad Horwitz, CEO of majority shareholder Trilogy International Partners, arrived in Auckland this morning and have met with the company’s management team.

“We have all taken comfort from the comments and heartfelt sympathies from around the world expressed about Eric and Kathy,” says Mr Sherriff.

“Eric was a veteran in the wireless industry and brought that experience to bear in the New Zealand market. He has built a great team and his passion for excellence and exceeding customer’s expectations have been instilled into the entire organization. The board has complete confidence that the 2degrees team will continue to drive change and innovation into the New Zealand market,” says Brad Horwitz.

To provide continuity and support, 2degrees Chairman and Senior Vice President of Trilogy, Mr Stewart Sherriff will assume the interim role of CEO for 2degrees, effective immediately.

Mr Sherriff has more than 35 years of telecommunications industry experience and has been involved in 2degrees since Trilogy’s investment prior to the company’s launch.

In addition, 2degrees is liaising with Eric and Kathy’s families in the US and continues to provide support for their daughter. Staff have been offered support and an online tribute page will be added to the 2degrees website later this afternoon, so those wishing to post a message about Eric and Kathy can do so.




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  Reply # 791893 2-Apr-2013 19:36
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Plane wreck has been found:

http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/8499334/Eric-Hertzs-wrecked-plane-found


At least that'll give the families some closure.




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  Reply # 794735 7-Apr-2013 20:30
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Update on stuff regarding the plane.

http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/8517293/Both-bodies-recovered-from-Hertz-plane-wreckage

So sad but now the family will have closure.




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  Reply # 794788 7-Apr-2013 22:23
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Eric came up to everyone in the 2degrees China Town store opening line and shook everyone's hand and gave balloons to the people in line as well.
I was one of the only few in the line that recognised him, we talked for a minute and he seemed like a genuinely nice guy! Such a rare occurrence that a CEO of a company that size would take the time out of his busy personal life and meet everyone in a line on an early Saturday morning!



BDFL - Memuneh
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  Reply # 1581454 27-Jun-2016 20:09
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2degrees boss should not have been flying:

 

 

In the final report into the investigation, the Civil Aviation Authority of New Zealand found there were multiple contributing factors which caused the plane to lose speed and enter a spin it could ultimately not get out of at about 12.20pm on Saturday, March 30.

 

The reason for the aircraft rapidly losing speed and disappearing from radar was inconclusive, but the most likely reason was it experiencing a reduction in power or power loss from the aircraft's left engine which caused it to crash near the Kawhia Harbour.

 

While the CAA has not blamed the medication, Duloxetine, Hertz was on for Generalised Anxiety Disorder or Major Depressive Disorder as the cause of the crash, it has said the American executive would have most likely not been issued a medical certificate and therefore not allowed to fly a plane if it had been declared to either the CAA or the Federal Aviation Administration in the US.

 

 

 





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  Reply # 1581643 28-Jun-2016 07:22
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While the CAA has not blamed the medication, Duloxetine, Hertz was on for Generalised Anxiety Disorder or Major Depressive Disorder as the cause of the crash, it has said the American executive would have most likely not been issued a medical certificate and therefore not allowed to fly a plane if it had been declared to either the CAA or the Federal Aviation Administration in the US.

 

 

So, it's OK to take the medication (or at least it's not a cause of this accident), but CAA won't allow you to fly if you're taking it.

 

This is typical of the backwardness of CAA. A pilot is forced to choose between flying unmedicated, or not flying. There is evidence of crashes caused by pilots who *should* have been medicated but weren't. Australia's CASA does allow flying whilst on anti-depressants. The FAA is at least considering changing its position on this.

 

 


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  Reply # 1581725 28-Jun-2016 09:54
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The article on the news last night was slanted.  Bulk of the story on how he "was not fit to fly" and how this was a factor in the crash, and then a one liner about engine failure (probably not caused by his anxiety me thinks)...


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  Reply # 1581726 28-Jun-2016 09:56
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itxtme:

 

The article on the news last night was slanted.  Bulk of the story on how he "was not fit to fly" and how this was a factor in the crash, and then a one liner about engine failure (probably not caused by his anxiety me thinks)...

 

 

Yea that pissed me off a bit. The cause of the crash was the engine failure and Erics inability to deal with it, not the fact he suffered from stress/anxiety.

 

 

 

 


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  Reply # 1581782 28-Jun-2016 10:59
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Yeah... same as the balloon accident at Carterton...

 

(headline) Pilot's medical had expired. (fine print) Not considered relevant to the crash.

 

(headline) Pilot had THC in his blood. (fine print) Not known if relevant to the crash.

 

 


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  Reply # 1581787 28-Jun-2016 11:04
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The trouble with CAA's approach to Aviation is that their definite answer to reducing risk and accidents is to constantly prevent people from flying, or to find ways and reasons that make it difficult.

 

 

 

This leads to a culture where pilots and operators would rather not disclose pertinent information for fear of reprisals or difficulty to the authority, which in turn actually makes for a systemic environment where near misses or minor infractions are simply covered up.


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  Reply # 1581846 28-Jun-2016 12:49
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frankv:

 

While the CAA has not blamed the medication, Duloxetine, Hertz was on for Generalised Anxiety Disorder or Major Depressive Disorder as the cause of the crash, it has said the American executive would have most likely not been issued a medical certificate and therefore not allowed to fly a plane if it had been declared to either the CAA or the Federal Aviation Administration in the US.

 

 

So, it's OK to take the medication (or at least it's not a cause of this accident), but CAA won't allow you to fly if you're taking it.

 

This is typical of the backwardness of CAA. A pilot is forced to choose between flying unmedicated, or not flying. There is evidence of crashes caused by pilots who *should* have been medicated but weren't. Australia's CASA does allow flying whilst on anti-depressants. The FAA is at least considering changing its position on this.

 

 

 

 

 

 

There's nothing backward here. The pilot in this case was not fit to fly whether or was taking these drugs or not.
CASA allows some pilots taking some specific drugs to fly in some cases (such as private flights), as does the FAA. Neither allow any pilot to fly while taking Duloxetine.

 

 


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  Reply # 1581949 28-Jun-2016 13:48
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Sounddude:

 

 

 

Yea that pissed me off a bit. The cause of the crash was the engine failure and Erics inability to deal with it, not the fact he suffered from stress/anxiety.

 

 

It's quite clear that the aircraft should have been perfectly flyable and controllable even if one engine failed. The CAA says that Eric's depression/anxiety issues and/or side-effects of his medication, meant that he might not have been able to deal properly with the engine failure.

 

From the preliminary report

 

 

Radar evidence shows that 30 minutes into the flight, after reaching its cruise altitude of 18,000 feet, the aircraft's groundspeed decreased sharply. The aircraft began a 'high rate of descent', and after approximately one and a half minutes, disappeared from radar. In transmissions to Air Traffic Control (ATC) the pilot indicated that he had an emergency and was experiencing problems with both engines.

 

“Examination of the aircraft’s propellers indicated that they were under little or no power at the time the aircraft impacted the water. The propeller angles were in a position usually associated with a cruise setting.” Mr Ford said.

 

 

Yesterday's report is available here. Some excerpts:

 

 

The conversation concluded between Air Traffic Control (ATC) and the pilot of N254F, approximately one minute and 25 seconds after the initial transmission, with the pilot stating ‘okay we have two engines out’. This was the final transmission heard from the pilot of N254F.

 

As N254F was an American registered aircraft, the pilot was operating it under his FAA Pilot Certificate and FAA Pilot Medical Certificate.

 

The instructor who conducted the simulator training with the pilot in New Zealand was complimentary about the pilot’s ability to handle emergency drills that were practised in the simulator.

 

With regard to the pilot’s medical status the CAA Principal Medical Officer requested the pilot’s medical notes from his American and New Zealand GPs and also the FAA. The notes from the pilot’s American GP indicate that the pilot had been prescribed Duloxetine for the purpose of treating a Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). The notes from his New Zealand GP suggest that duloxetine was prescribed for the treatment of Generalised Anxiety Disorder (GAD).

 

A report produced by the CAA Principal Medical Officer, after consultation with the FAA, suggests that had a diagnosis of GAD or MDD been known to the FAA, it ‘would have resulted in medical certification denial unless the condition was in definite, and well documented, remission for at least twelve months without the need for medication.’ It is also likely that the pilot would have been denied a medical certificate if the FAA had been aware of his long term use of Duloxetine.

 

 

The CAA's licensing and medical procedures are pretty much irrelevant because it was an American registered plane.

 

The wreckage examination found some faults (pipe detached from where it ought to be, 95% clogged fuel filter, turbocharger inlet housing manufacturing fault) with the left engine but not the right, which I guess is why it's suggested that only the left engine failed, yet Eric reported both engines out. It *may* be that Eric accidentally shut down the good engine (he wouldn't be the first to do this). OTOH, if the propellers were in cruise (which I assume means coarse) pitch, then Eric apparently didn't feather either prop. Which is another way that he didn't respond to the failure properly. The left engine is the 'critical' engine on a Baron, but the aircraft would still fly OK on the right engine alone, provided airspeed was maintained.

 

The plane apparently spun down from 18,000ft in cloud. A spin in a Baron is probably unrecoverable, especially inside cloud with no external references. I think it's probable that Eric deliberately pulled power on the right engine to try to avoid, or recover from, the spin. There's some interesting aspects to the 18,000ft altitude... turbochargers had recently been installed which meant this aircraft could fly higher than normal... the POH only went up to about 17,000ft. Oxygen was also recently installed, and was probably inhaled via nasal canulla, which is limited to 18,000ft or below. There was also some possibility of icing. So, in lots of ways, Eric was on the limit.

 

 




BDFL - Memuneh
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  Reply # 1721500 16-Feb-2017 19:34
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