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  Reply # 917788 20-Oct-2013 16:37
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Yup, there are residential routers with this feature.

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  Reply # 917791 20-Oct-2013 16:44
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SamF:
michaelmurfy:

QoS doesn't always work on a connection with any router unless if you reserve that bandwidth, VoIP is a real time service and I've got a very decent router, QoS has my VoIP set in real time mode and if this connection is saturated I find that VoIP just isn't reliable.



As I said, a decent router / firewall will properly take care of QOS - I am running a free version of Astaro / Sophos and even completely maxxing out my line, I never have any issues with VOIP quality.


You also need to remember you don't have full control over downstream traffic and can't determine the order of the packets so downstream QoS can only be partially effective. You can really only effectively control QoS fully on upstream.

At the end of the day a regular EUBA ADSL2+ or VDSL2 connection is only a best effort connection. If you want guaranteed QoS you can pick a EUBA plan with CIR or a UFB plan. There are no such plans however for VDSL2.

 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 917793 20-Oct-2013 16:49
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SamF: Yup, there are residential routers with this feature.


Shame it doesn't work well for VoIP huh? QoS on residential routers simply isn't reliable enough for VoIP, there's just not enough processing power to make it work efficiently. Heck, I've got a Cisco 877 integrated services router running at my parents with QoS programmed, sure it does work better but it's just not 100% reliable. There's my point, your average consumer doesn't know about QoS, or the rules on these routers, so why not just avoid all this and just go with POTS?

The OP is your average customer, POTS is better suited for him / his family. You and me are a bit more advanced but this is a prime example of why VoIP just isn't ready for your general public unless if you've got fibre and it's built into the ONT.




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  Reply # 917802 20-Oct-2013 17:01
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As long as it's configured correctly it'll work fine.

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