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104 posts

Master Geek
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Topic # 201429 18-Aug-2016 09:24
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Not so long ago my routers WAN IP address was reasonably static, it would generally stay the same for weeks at a time, usually only changing on a router reboot, however recently this has changed, and not just different addresses in the same scope but vastly different scopes.  In the last week I have had addresses from:

 

  • 111.69.227.x
  • 123.255.26.x
  • 163.47.220.x

Sometimes my address is shifting daily.

 

I have a fundamental issue with paying $10 for a "static" address as this seems like a huge rip off for what is essentially a one off reservation in a DHCP range somewhere so I use a dynamic DNS service.  

 

So from work I have a connection running to home and all is fine and suddenly it disconnects, so I flush my DNS and do a refresh pick up the new IP and off we go again, annoying but not end of the world.

 

Now where it really becomes an issue is firewall rules.  I have some stuff from other locations that I am trying to lock down so allow connections from specific IP ranges, with the above carry on this has become pretty much impossible (OK lets allow connections from 111.x.x.x to 163.x.x.x, that nearly a third of the whole flippin internet!).

 

I thought I would contact my ISP as in the past I have found them to have really good service (until they were purchased by a larger telco that is), I was assuming they were doing some changes and wanted to know if things were going to settle down.

 

As suspected the poor first level "have you rebooted your router" support guy didn't have a clue so he tried to sell me a "static" address (I used to have a real static address once in the good old days of KCBBS, that is one you manually enter in on your router WAN interface).  I got his to escalate for more information.

 

I got an email response from them later that evening:

 

Per our phone call I have spoken with NOC our network tech team.   They have advised me that they reserve the right to make alterations to IP addresses dynamically on ranges at their discretion.   If you are still concerned we have as per our conversation the option of a static IP.   That's a pretty sh*tty response really.  Yes I understand and accept they have the right to make alterations, I was not challenging that, just wanting to know why the big changes and the frequency.   Stuck in a contract with these guys for another year, decided to move on after that as they put my charges up twice now whilst in contract, and now they are offering the general public a much better deal than the one I am locked into which is pretty darn rude.   Ah the downfall of a once good ISP.   Rant.end() };


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1405 posts

Uber Geek
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  Reply # 1613609 18-Aug-2016 09:37
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Who is the ISP?

 

I'm guessing its 2Degrees, ex snap?



104 posts

Master Geek
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  Reply # 1613623 18-Aug-2016 09:40
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Dairyxox: Who is the ISP? I'm guessing its 2Degrees, ex snap?

 

 

 

Uh huh, probably not hard to figure out unfortunately.


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  Reply # 1613631 18-Aug-2016 09:51
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Related thread. They fixed this for me, which makes SSHing into my heavily firewalled server much easier. Might just be a setting that needs to change, but @RalphFromSnap didn't say exactly what he did last time.





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104 posts

Master Geek
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  Reply # 1613635 18-Aug-2016 09:56
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timmmay:

 

Related thread. They fixed this for me, which makes SSHing into my heavily firewalled server much easier. Might just be a setting that needs to change, but @RalphFromSnap didn't say exactly what he did last time.

 

 

 

 

Might try @RalphFromSnap, if he is till there...


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  Reply # 1613670 18-Aug-2016 11:14
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I'm with them too for Fibre. I've also noticed that their IP addresses are not very sticky/change quickly whenever I restart the router, but aside from that mine does stick.

 

 

You're not getting micro power outages? The router isn't paying up?

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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 1613673 18-Aug-2016 11:26
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FlyingPete:

 

 

 

Per our phone call I have spoken with NOC our network tech team.   They have advised me that they reserve the right to make alterations to IP addresses dynamically on ranges at their discretion.   If you are still concerned we have as per our conversation the option of a static IP.   That's a pretty sh*tty response really.  Yes I understand and accept they have the right to make alterations, I was not challenging that, just wanting to know why the big changes and the frequency.   Stuck in a contract with these guys for another year, decided to move on after that as they put my charges up twice now whilst in contract, and now they are offering the general public a much better deal than the one I am locked into which is pretty darn rude.   Ah the downfall of a once good ISP.   Rant.end() };

 

 

 

 

So, the core of your issue is you really want a static IP but you don't want to pay for it.....




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  Reply # 1613678 18-Aug-2016 11:35
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noroad:

 

 

 

So, the core of your issue is you really want a static IP but you don't want to pay for it.....

 

 

Yeah probably.  

 

But I can cope and have coped with dynamic addresses for years (already got a paid DDNS service with domain name registered), just seems they have gone a bit OTT on the dynamic bit.


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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 1613683 18-Aug-2016 11:46
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FlyingPete:

 

But I can cope and have coped with dynamic addresses for years (already got a paid DDNS service with domain name registered), just seems they have gone a bit OTT on the dynamic bit.

 

 

 

 

There can be many perfectly logical reasons for this, you might find that your connection is being balanced over multiple BNG's for example, so each time you connect you will go onto the least loaded (for example) BNG and anyone on a standard dynamic pool gets whatever is configured on that BNG. Remember a dynamic customer is assumed to not care what their IP is as long as it works, if they cared they would pay the nominal fee to reserve a static. A static customer needs a specific route that moves with them around the BNG's as needed. I would suggest your dynamic IP becoming more dynamic is likely due to redundancy improvements within your ISP rather than anything nefarious.




104 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 6


  Reply # 1613688 18-Aug-2016 11:50
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noroad:

 

 

 

There can be many perfectly logical reasons for this, you might find that your connection is being balanced over multiple BNG's for example, so each time you connect you will go onto the least loaded (for example) BNG and anyone on a standard dynamic pool gets whatever is configured on that BNG. Remember a dynamic customer is assumed to not care what their IP is as long as it works, if they cared they would pay the nominal fee to reserve a static. A static customer needs a specific route that moves with them around the BNG's as needed. I would suggest your dynamic IP becoming more dynamic is likely due to redundancy improvements within your ISP rather than anything nefarious.

 

 

Now that is a far more reasonable answer then I was given by the ISP, makes sense given the ranges are completely different.  

 

I had assumed in the first instance they were doing work on the network that was moving stuff around and it was a temporary situation.


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2degrees

  Reply # 1613695 18-Aug-2016 12:02
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Hi all,

 

The vast majority of the time, the only reason your IP would change is if your PPP connection is being re-established. Worthy of note also is that our dynamic addressing pool does contain different subnets as more get added based on demand. Our dynamic IPv4 addresses aren't overly sticky, so it is unlikely for you to receive the same address if your PPP connection flaps.

 

I  would recommend checking your modem logs to see if the connection is being reestablished, that could point to a potential reason why this is occurring and hopefully a resolution. For example if your DSL connection is dropping, probably points towards a line issue or similar.

 

FlyingPete, feel free to flick us a message with your broadband customer number or username, and we'll take a look into this from our side and see if we can spot an obvious cause.

 

Thanks,

 

Ralph ^JOB




104 posts

Master Geek
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  Reply # 1614245 19-Aug-2016 11:13
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Thanks 2degrees for getting to the bottom of this, there was a good reason for the unusual behaviour in the end, frequent reconnects probably caused by the people digging up the street.


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