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  Reply # 2063016 26-Jul-2018 15:25
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Hi, this is exactly the way I have setup all similar situations that I have dealt with. That way you keep all your resources within your network and just expose what is required. If you note my original response you will see recommended just port forwarding the 2nd PubIP to the other server. I suspect thought that the Fritz does not let you DSTNAT any IP other than the one it is aware of, ie the one via the pppoe client.

 

Cyril




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  Reply # 2063044 26-Jul-2018 16:32
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So many excellent suggestions and words of advice have enlightened me somewhat to the point that I'll re-evaluate where I am at, and how to get to my final requirements. It'll take some considering and probably will require me to sit down and map out exactly what I need to do - diagrams work well :)

I may very well come knocking on the door later for advice. For now I'll not buy a new router and will sit on the subnet...It's quite easy to cancel it if it's not needed.

Thanks all for your help, it is appreciated

 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 2063065 26-Jul-2018 16:48
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State in simplest terms what your use case is and then we can help with suggesting how that could be done.

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  Reply # 2063687 27-Jul-2018 14:46
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If I were doing this on a firewall there are two ways to achieve it. Assuming we have a WAN interface, LAN interface, and a "DMZ" interface (could be secondary LAN or whatever you want to call it):

 

First method (routed, essentially lets you have 2 IPs, 203.xxx.xxx.xxx and 202.xxx.xxx.38)

 

WAN IP: 203.xxx.xxx.xxx (connected to the net)

 

LAN IP: 192.168.0.0/24 (private subnet, NATs to WAN IP by default)

 

DMZ IP: 202.xxx.xxx.37 (leaves you one free IP address, 202.xxx.xxx.38, note as an internal interface no gateway is required, NAT should be disabled)

 

 

 

Second method (NAT'd, leaves you 5 IPs: 203.xxx.xxx.xxx and 202.xxx.xxx.36/37/38/39)

 

WAN IP: 203.xxx.xxx.xxx (connected to the net)

 

LAN IP: 192.168.0.0/24 (Private subnet, NATs to WAN IP default)

 

DMZ IP: 192.168.2.0/24 (Private subnet, use NAT rules for 202.xxx.xxx.36/37/38/39 to forward traffic to hosts, use reciprocal NATs for outbound traffic if necessary)

 

 

 

It will depend on how flexible your router or firewall is.

 

 

 

 

 

 


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  Reply # 2063728 27-Jul-2018 15:59
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The FritzBox does port forwarding but has no DMZ functionality.

 

 

My question is, what does the internet facing box do and can that be moved to AWS or a SaaS service. That would just take care of all the networking issues. Private internet connections are also not really geared for supporting a production server/always up service. You should run that out of a DC that actually has some redundancy and uptime guarantees.

 

 


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  Reply # 2063787 27-Jul-2018 18:20
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olivernz: Private internet connections are also not really geared for supporting a production server/always up service. You should run that out of a DC that actually has some redundancy and uptime guarantees.

 

 

 

Where's the fun in that?




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  Reply # 2066408 1-Aug-2018 16:30
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vulcannz:

If I were doing this on a firewall there are two ways to achieve it. Assuming we have a WAN interface, LAN interface, and a "DMZ" interface (could be secondary LAN or whatever you want to call it):


First method (routed, essentially lets you have 2 IPs, 203.xxx.xxx.xxx and 202.xxx.xxx.38)


WAN IP: 203.xxx.xxx.xxx (connected to the net)


LAN IP: 192.168.0.0/24 (private subnet, NATs to WAN IP by default)


DMZ IP: 202.xxx.xxx.37 (leaves you one free IP address, 202.xxx.xxx.38, note as an internal interface no gateway is required, NAT should be disabled)


 


Second method (NAT'd, leaves you 5 IPs: 203.xxx.xxx.xxx and 202.xxx.xxx.36/37/38/39)


WAN IP: 203.xxx.xxx.xxx (connected to the net)


LAN IP: 192.168.0.0/24 (Private subnet, NATs to WAN IP default)


DMZ IP: 192.168.2.0/24 (Private subnet, use NAT rules for 202.xxx.xxx.36/37/38/39 to forward traffic to hosts, use reciprocal NATs for outbound traffic if necessary)


 


It will depend on how flexible your router or firewall is.


 


 


 



I'm thinking that your second method sounds the best. I've thrown out the fritz as subnets are a no go with it. I've purchased an Edge Router 4 and now setting to configuring it. I suppose if I am to configure it then its best to do so with the end result being as you've described in option 2. It gives me the most flexibility...I think.

Time to learn the Edge...

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