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Topic # 89165 26-Aug-2011 19:04
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 Snap future proofs all customers with IPv6

Every Snap customer can have Internet-routable IPv6 addresses

 

 

26 August 2011

All Snap Internet customers now have native IPv6 connectivity for no additional cost to safeguard them from the threat of IPv4 address exhaustion.

As of this year, no more IPv4 addresses can be allocated from network registries. The numbers of IPv4 addresses available for customers are dwindling and will become costlier as a result.

While other ISPs talk about putting in the new Internet addressing protocol IPv6 Snap has already moved to ensure future connectivity for customers.

Starting this August, Snap’s network is fully IPv6 enabled for all customers. The IPv6 service will run alongside Snap’s normal IPv4 connectivity.

All you need to do is to upgrade to a DSL or other router that’s IPv6 capable and configured properly, and you can start accessing the Internet with the new address protocol. Snap will initially be offering support for IPv6 via email, but will extend this to phone support later this year (Please note that if router configuration and IPv6 troubleshooting is needed, it will be handled by Snap’s Tier 2 Technical Specialists which may be charged)

Mark Petrie SNAP COO says:  “We have been preparing for IPv4 addresses to run out for the past four years, and wanted to ensure that our customers can continue using the Internet without interruption, or further costs. This is hugely important, especially for business customers depending on the Internet.”

As most residential routers presently don’t support IPv6, in a further move to ensure easy migration to the new protocol, Snap will be selling AVM Fritz! Boxes from September. These are fully enabled for IPv6, and pre-configured by Snap.

Commercial customers can get support from Snap too, for help with migrating to the new protocol from Snap’s IPv6 trained staff.

Globally, everyone is getting ready for IPv6 and so should you. Already, many sites on the Internet are fully IPv6 enabled such as Google. In June this year, Google, Yahoo, Facebook and other Internet giants held the World IPv6 Day to kick off uptake of the new protocol, and to test it around the world.

Petrie says “All new operating systems such as Windows, Mac OS X and iOS, and Linux are ready to run IPv6 too. “

Moving to IPv6 means each device can reach others directly on the Internet – this is called the end-to-end principle, and it ensures the best network performance possible, with the least complexity.

Already, the lack of IPv4 addresses has led to extensive use of measures such as Network Address Translation or NAT. However, NAT which uses addresses that cannot be found directly on the Internet breaks the important end-to-end principle and adds complexity, especially for large networks. It may also cause performance issues.

Snap DSL plans for residential users start at $75 a month with broadband and phone, with more available.

To test if you’re connected with IPv6, go to http://test-ipv6.com.

 

For further information, please contact: Mark Petrie on 021990044

Snap Internet is based in Christchurch and provides Internet access and service throughout New Zealand. It has been voted TUANZ Provider of the Year for the past three years running.

IPv6 with SNAP FACTS:

The current Internet Protocol addressing system, IPv4, was designed in the 1970s and provides around four billion addresses. Every device connected to the Internet must have an IP address to be found by others, so it can send and receive traffic.

 

With the explosive growth in Internet usage through broadband connections and mobile no more IPv4 addresses can be allocated by regional registries as from this year. This means we are dipping into allocated address banks, and soon, we’ll be running out of IPv4 addresses altogether. The shortage may lead to pricing for existing IPv4 addresses sky-rocketing, which is bad news for businesses with Internet presences.

 

The solution for the IPv4 shortage is to move to a new protocol called IPv6. This new address protocol fits a vast amount of addresses, around 340 undecillion ones, or 340,282,366,920,938,463,463,374,607,431,768,211,456 to be precise.

 

Snap has been running IPv6 across its core Juniper network for over four years now and we were the first ISP in NZ to be certified by the IPv6 forum: http://www.ipv6forum.com/ipv6_enabled/isp/approval_list.php.

 

Furthermore, Snap has native IPv6 to many Internet exchanges across the world, and has been actively upgraded its network for full Ipv6 support.

 

Snap has also been providing IPv6 transport connections across its fibre networks to many large University and Enterprise customers for many years now.

 


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Master Geek
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  Reply # 512806 27-Aug-2011 10:26
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This is great guys, finally a break in the chicken and egg standoff.
I see internode in AU have introduced v6 as well, hopefully this is the kick in the backside CPE manufacturers need.

It turns out the Mikrotik router which I thought had IPV6 support for sometime doesn't support DHCPv6-PD therefore can't collect a prefix from Snap. Is it possible to have the prefix statically assigned?

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  Reply # 512946 27-Aug-2011 20:04
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Go snap.... looks at Vodafone + telecom.....

Big up's to Snap




In any moment of decision, the best thing you can do is the right thing, the next best thing is the wrong thing, and the worst thing you can do is nothing.

 
 
 
 


wjw

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  Reply # 516936 5-Sep-2011 15:59
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If your router supports it, IPv6 on Snap DSL is easy now:

 

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  Reply # 517024 5-Sep-2011 17:53
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Can someone translate for the lay-people amongst us.
How does this announcement effect me as a residential Snap broadband customer?

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  Reply # 517030 5-Sep-2011 18:01
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GeoffisPure: Can someone translate for the lay-people amongst us.
How does this announcement effect me as a residential Snap broadband customer?


It means if you have a IPv6 compatible modem/router + OS/computers they'll all get (public) IPv6 addresses and you'll be able to connect to IPv6 (only) hosts, etc.

 

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  Reply # 517055 5-Sep-2011 18:36
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So in the future some websites/servers will only allow connections from the new IPv6 connections? Why? Is there a technical limitation that means these new IP ranges are not backwards compatible?

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  Reply # 517058 5-Sep-2011 18:38
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GeoffisPure: So in the future some websites/servers will only allow connections from the new IPv6 connections? Why? Is there a technical limitation that means these new IP ranges are not backwards compatible?


New ones may. More likely it will be servers or p2p clients that only have public v6 IPs. (Mostly for P2P.. Your ISP will end up NATing you at their side and then you'll get NATed by your modem/router. So there's no way you can connect to anyone else behind the same thing, unless you both have ipv6)

Most big webservers will roll out both v4 and v6 but there may be servers that are ipv6 only in the future..


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  Reply # 517059 5-Sep-2011 18:39
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GeoffisPure: So in the future some websites/servers will only allow connections from the new IPv6 connections? Why? Is there a technical limitation that means these new IP ranges are not backwards compatible?


Er also to answer your second question, yes. IPv6 addresses are 128bits long and it doesn't work with v4..


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  Reply # 519609 11-Sep-2011 17:08
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How does this work with internal addresses? v4 is nice and simple, I statically assign my internal lan with addresses and they stay the same.

If the v6 is internet routable, how do I assign things on the PCs? To tell you the truth all I have done with ipv6 sofar is disable it on windows so the answer might be staring straight at me in there.




Richard rich.ms

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  Reply # 519644 11-Sep-2011 18:39
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richms: How does this work with internal addresses? v4 is nice and simple, I statically assign my internal lan with addresses and they stay the same.

If the v6 is internet routable, how do I assign things on the PCs? To tell you the truth all I have done with ipv6 sofar is disable it on windows so the answer might be staring straight at me in there.


You can either still set your IPs statically or let your modem set them via DHCPv6/RA.

(You'll need to enable ipv6 in windows again if you've disabled it, obviously. The time for "disabling ipv6 to fix something" is gone)


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  Reply # 519647 11-Sep-2011 18:50
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How does that work when the external IP changes tho? wouldnt things not work till they renewed their lease? also having things change all the time would be really annoying unless windows has got better at dealing with IP changes when it comes to connecting to shares etc.




Richard rich.ms

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  Reply # 519664 11-Sep-2011 19:24
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richms: How does this work with internal addresses? v4 is nice and simple, I statically assign my internal lan with addresses and they stay the same.

If the v6 is internet routable, how do I assign things on the PCs? To tell you the truth all I have done with ipv6 sofar is disable it on windows so the answer might be staring straight at me in there.

Lots of options - use link-local addressing if your network is one flat L2 domain; use ULAs if you have multiple L2 domains with routed segments; or just allow SLAAC to renumber your network when* your delegated prefix changes - the renumbering is supposed to be relatively graceful and transparent to the end user.

* assuming it ever does change.

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  Reply # 519675 11-Sep-2011 20:11
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PenultimateHop:
richms: How does this work with internal addresses? v4 is nice and simple, I statically assign my internal lan with addresses and they stay the same.

If the v6 is internet routable, how do I assign things on the PCs? To tell you the truth all I have done with ipv6 sofar is disable it on windows so the answer might be staring straight at me in there.

Lots of options - use link-local addressing if your network is one flat L2 domain; use ULAs if you have multiple L2 domains with routed segments; or just allow SLAAC to renumber your network when* your delegated prefix changes - the renumbering is supposed to be relatively graceful and transparent to the end user.

* assuming it ever does change.


The other issue is how to get the different PCs on different internet connections, assuming that slingshot support it anytime soon, as I am guessing I cant just put a different default gateway on the machines to get them on different connections while still seeing each other on the local network.

I guess the next router I get will to ipV6 so I really should put some effort into understanding it soon.




Richard rich.ms

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  Reply # 519682 11-Sep-2011 20:29
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At least in linux, you'll just get multiple ipv6 IPs and just setup a default route via whatever route you want.

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