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StussyNz
12 posts

Geek


  #714219 8-Nov-2012 15:56
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Jeeves: If you want to get into the ISP side of network engineering, make sure you read up on BGP, and become really familiar with it. It's the kind of thing that you only really learn on the job, but to get the job you're expected to know it.

When I was sitting in on interviews for senior network engineers, the amount of people that had acronyms up the wazoo written on their CV, only to have no clue on such things (for example :how many usable IP's in a /27) was staggering.

Other protocols and technologies to get familiar on would be OSPF, 802.1q, 802.1ad, STP (*shudder*), MST, radius, netflow, snmp, pppoe, and qos.

Also subscribe yourself to the NZNOG mail group to see some real life banter between the network engies of NZ.

I completely lucked out in my career path. I did a year 1st level tech support at the warehouse, went to the UK for a year and did nothing but got drunk, came back and landed a kind of 'apprentice' network engineer role, which I stayed in for 4 years and am now at another ISP in a similar role.


Sounds like you got lucky indeed! I just need a bit of luck! I'm all up on my material and would be able to answer most of those questions if was ever asked..

Do you get exposed to a large amount of equipment working for a Large ISP? I'd jump at the chance to get a role like that, would keep be busy and on my feet something which I love in a job!

StussyNz
12 posts

Geek


  #714220 8-Nov-2012 15:58
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stuartgr: Where abouts are you guys based?  I know a vendor (commercial network provider) who is looking for network engineers.  Unsure of what skill level, but could be worth a look.


I'm currently based in Auckland; Would love to know of any potential openings.

 
 
 
 


StussyNz
12 posts

Geek


  #714241 8-Nov-2012 16:30
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Jeeves: If you want to get into the ISP side of network engineering, make sure you read up on BGP, and become really familiar with it. It's the kind of thing that you only really learn on the job, but to get the job you're expected to know it.

When I was sitting in on interviews for senior network engineers, the amount of people that had acronyms up the wazoo written on their CV, only to have no clue on such things (for example :how many usable IP's in a /27) was staggering.

Other protocols and technologies to get familiar on would be OSPF, 802.1q, 802.1ad, STP (*shudder*), MST, radius, netflow, snmp, pppoe, and qos.

Also subscribe yourself to the NZNOG mail group to see some real life banter between the network engies of NZ.

I completely lucked out in my career path. I did a year 1st level tech support at the warehouse, went to the UK for a year and did nothing but got drunk, came back and landed a kind of 'apprentice' network engineer role, which I stayed in for 4 years and am now at another ISP in a similar role.


Any chance that you could assit with helping me to join the mailing list that you specified? Would love to get in on the loop!

Cheers.

Ragnor
8035 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted

  #714468 9-Nov-2012 05:03
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StussyNz: 
Any chance that you could assit with helping me to join the mailing list that you specified? Would love to get in on the loop!

Cheers.


http://list.waikato.ac.nz/mailman/listinfo/nznog
 

and Aussie one which is more active than the NZ one

http://www.ausnog.net/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=53&Itemid=63

StussyNz
12 posts

Geek


  #714554 9-Nov-2012 10:25
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Ragnor:
StussyNz: 
Any chance that you could assit with helping me to join the mailing list that you specified? Would love to get in on the loop!

Cheers.


http://list.waikato.ac.nz/mailman/listinfo/nznog
 

and Aussie one which is more active than the NZ one

http://www.ausnog.net/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=53&Itemid=63


Cheers. All signed up!

Jeeves
302 posts

Ultimate Geek


  #714558 9-Nov-2012 10:49
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StussyNz:
Jeeves: If you want to get into the ISP side of network engineering, make sure you read up on BGP, and become really familiar with it. It's the kind of thing that you only really learn on the job, but to get the job you're expected to know it.

When I was sitting in on interviews for senior network engineers, the amount of people that had acronyms up the wazoo written on their CV, only to have no clue on such things (for example :how many usable IP's in a /27) was staggering.

Other protocols and technologies to get familiar on would be OSPF, 802.1q, 802.1ad, STP (*shudder*), MST, radius, netflow, snmp, pppoe, and qos.

Also subscribe yourself to the NZNOG mail group to see some real life banter between the network engies of NZ.

I completely lucked out in my career path. I did a year 1st level tech support at the warehouse, went to the UK for a year and did nothing but got drunk, came back and landed a kind of 'apprentice' network engineer role, which I stayed in for 4 years and am now at another ISP in a similar role.


Sounds like you got lucky indeed! I just need a bit of luck! I'm all up on my material and would be able to answer most of those questions if was ever asked..

Do you get exposed to a large amount of equipment working for a Large ISP? I'd jump at the chance to get a role like that, would keep be busy and on my feet something which I love in a job!


Both the companies aren't large - I would say small/medium ISP. However the exposure to equipment is fairly broad. It's been 99% Cisco (Between the two companies there has only been 2 Juniper routers involved anywhere). 6500's have been the work horses as they are so versatile, but I've also worked on ASR's, Nexus, and CatOS. 
My current role is more security focused so I work mostly with Fortigates and so spend less time on the network, but having the networking background knowledge is advantageous when it comes to setting up firewalls.

The ISP that gave me the 'apprentice' role threw me in the deep and and I had admin access fairly quickly to the whole network. I was pretty careful, but yea... I quickly learnt how important the "add" command is when using "switchport trunk allowed vlan"..., as well as how dangerous VTP is.




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