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  Reply # 874397 9-Aug-2013 10:01
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Zeon: I would hardly call Supermicro whitebox. They are probably the most used servers for hosting worldwide.


I am sure they have been good for you. But in terms of world market share the IDC report I looked at didn't show them in the top 5 (IBM, HP, Dell, Oracle, Fujitsu, Cisco)




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  Reply # 874410 9-Aug-2013 10:30
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CapBBeard: I see Fujitsu taking a lot of stick here but I have to say our experience with their gear has certainly been positive.

They've been our principal server vendor for quite some time now and their late model RX300 line have been rock solid stable for us. The team in Christchurch have generally been good for support also.

Worth a look at least.


Do you know what the difference between the SPARC servers and Industry standard servers are? No one at Fujitsu can answer this, very concerning.
I then get asked " will it make a difference " , well i wouldnt know as i don't know what the difference is?






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  Reply # 874412 9-Aug-2013 10:31
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lchiu7:
Zeon: I would hardly call Supermicro whitebox. They are probably the most used servers for hosting worldwide.


I am sure they have been good for you. But in terms of world market share the IDC report I looked at didn't show them in the top 5 (IBM, HP, Dell, Oracle, Fujitsu, Cisco)


Thanks, could you supply us with the IDC report  or a link you viewed?




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  Reply # 874440 9-Aug-2013 10:49
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BinaryLimited:
lchiu7:
Zeon: I would hardly call Supermicro whitebox. They are probably the most used servers for hosting worldwide.


I am sure they have been good for you. But in terms of world market share the IDC report I looked at didn't show them in the top 5 (IBM, HP, Dell, Oracle, Fujitsu, Cisco)


Thanks, could you supply us with the IDC report  or a link you viewed?


http://www.idc.com/getdoc.jsp?containerId=prUS24136113




System One: Popcorn Hour A200,  PS3 SuperSlim, NPVR and Plex Server running on Gigabyte Brix (Windows 10 Pro), Sony BDP-S390 BD player, Pioneer AVR, Raspberry Pi running Kodi and Plex, Panasonic 60" 3D plasma, Google Chromecast

System Two: Popcorn Hour A200 ,  Oppo BDP-80 BluRay Player with hardware mode to be region free, Vivitek HD1080P 1080P DLP projector with 100" screen. Harman Kardon HK AVR 254 7.1 receiver, Samsung 4K player, Google Chromecast

 


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  Reply # 874443 9-Aug-2013 10:54
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BinaryLimited:
CapBBeard: I see Fujitsu taking a lot of stick here but I have to say our experience with their gear has certainly been positive.

They've been our principal server vendor for quite some time now and their late model RX300 line have been rock solid stable for us. The team in Christchurch have generally been good for support also.

Worth a look at least.


Do you know what the difference between the SPARC servers and Industry standard servers are? No one at Fujitsu can answer this, very concerning.
I then get asked " will it make a difference " , well i wouldnt know as i don't know what the difference is?


We're not a huge shop and really only deal with the primergy (x86) stuff so I'm not all that up to speed on the SPARC gear sorry. Have you had a chat to any of the technical guys at Fujitsu? They certainly have people there that could answer you, I am surprised you are saying otherwise really.

Boiling it down, isnt it a question of architecture, a bit like the whole Itanium thing? If you're looking at running something like Solaris maybe take a look otherwise I'd stick to x86.

EDIT: Actually reading back through your earlier posts I see you will be running some Windows servers. That being the case SPARC is out of the question as the architecture is not compatible.

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  Reply # 874480 9-Aug-2013 11:33
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BinaryLimited:

Do you know what the difference between the SPARC servers and Industry standard servers are? No one at Fujitsu can answer this, very concerning.
I then get asked " will it make a difference " , well i wouldnt know as i don't know what the difference is?


Their SPARC line are, er, well, SPARC servers. I'm probably going to sound like a bit of an ass, but if you don't know what this means, don't touch them - it's a significant architectural difference. Primergy is their x86/x64 line, which is what you would look at if you were, for some reason, going to go with them. 




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  Reply # 874482 9-Aug-2013 11:35
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There is a huge difference between Sparc servers and those based x86 architecture. Only Sun (now Oracle) make Sparc servers and they usually run Solaris and have their own virtualisation technology (called Sun containers).  I recently was involved in the purchase of 8 Sun T4 servers like this

http://www.oracle.com/us/products/servers-storage/servers/sparc-enterprise/t-series/sparc-t4-1/overview/index.html

As you can see they are not X86 servers and are priced accordingly.




System One: Popcorn Hour A200,  PS3 SuperSlim, NPVR and Plex Server running on Gigabyte Brix (Windows 10 Pro), Sony BDP-S390 BD player, Pioneer AVR, Raspberry Pi running Kodi and Plex, Panasonic 60" 3D plasma, Google Chromecast

System Two: Popcorn Hour A200 ,  Oppo BDP-80 BluRay Player with hardware mode to be region free, Vivitek HD1080P 1080P DLP projector with 100" screen. Harman Kardon HK AVR 254 7.1 receiver, Samsung 4K player, Google Chromecast

 


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  Reply # 874497 9-Aug-2013 11:58
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@ichiu7 : THanks, interesting read.

@CapBBeard : Thanks, What shop do you own?

@Inphinity : Always interested in finding out new things, the SPARC servers do look nice in silver tho




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  Reply # 874501 9-Aug-2013 12:13
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Im surprised at the amount of people calling for HP over IBM




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  Reply # 874512 9-Aug-2013 12:24
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@CapBBeard : Thanks, What shop do you own?


Sorry, when I say 'shop' I mean it in the 'tech slang' way, ie 'we're a fujitsu shop' .. We dont sell anything, we just use fujitsu gear heavily. Perhaps not the best choice of words, have grown accustomed to it though!

Would rather not give away any specifics but a little bit of background: We're supporting about 250-300 users, we have a Hyper-V cluster consisting of RX300S7s + an Eternus SAN, plus a 5 server remote desktop services farm (more RX300s, S4-7) and a few other physical boxes.

So again, not that big but very happy with the current environment.

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  Reply # 875038 10-Aug-2013 12:18
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KiwiNZ: Ask yourself, how important is my data and how important is my clients data to them. Then consider what looks better when making business proposals.


Well yes and no. It depends,

If you're running a compute cluster with a hypervisor over the top, then it doesn't matter as much as your storage is separate.
Look at Dell, they have a whole cloudedge range of servers which are designed for that space where features are less important. If one were to fail your your VMs are up and running again in minutes.

If you're running stand alone servers without shared storage, then the vendors ability to execute on their warranty and parts replacement are critical, and that's where the brand names do well.

It also makes sense to pick the vendor well as there are obvious pros to having only to deal with one across your organisation. Dell also have their own financing plans, ie, Dell Financial Services if you prefer to lease your hardware , which can make good sense and free up capital for other things.

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