Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.




1304 posts

Uber Geek

Subscriber

# 222486 14-Aug-2017 12:43
Send private message

I've got some spare time this week so want to take a closer look at this for my Wordpress sites.

 

My host offers a free Cloudflare setup within Cpanel (which I use with the default settings) and I install W3TC set up as per numerous beginners guides found on the web. It is shared hosting but I pay more for extra CPU, RAM, I/O and a dedicated IP if that makes any difference. The sites are nothing special, they use paid themes, plugins are kept to a minimum and I follow all the obvious stuff with optimising images etc.

 

Pingdom and GTMetrix give me scores of +90% whereas PageSpeed Insights typically gives average scores. A site I've been playing with this morning has 95 on GTMetrix and 63 on PageSpeed.

 

I've read a fair amount of criticism about PageSpeed, ironically by caching blogs, so I'm wondering if I'm wasting my time trying to implement the suggestions anymore than I do now. It may point out something obvious I've missed but it suggested I should shave 7KB off a 73KB image this morning.

 

I'm also reading lots of good things about WP Rocket, so does anyone have any experience with that over W3TC ?


Create new topic
15549 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

  # 1846323 14-Aug-2017 13:29
One person supports this post
Send private message

Basically every plugin you install can make things worse. You should really add plugins for specific reasons that you can't achieve any other way. You can do a lot with an .htaccess file or the Nginx configuration.

 

I do quite a bit of this type of work as a small side business. If you post the Pagespeed results and the waterfall from webpagetest.org I might be able to give you some suggestions. If you post or PM the domain name I could tell you more.




1304 posts

Uber Geek

Subscriber

  # 1846373 14-Aug-2017 13:53
Send private message

timmmay:

 

Basically every plugin you install can make things worse. You should really add plugins for specific reasons that you can't achieve any other way. You can do a lot with an .htaccess file or the Nginx configuration.

 

I do quite a bit of this type of work as a small side business. If you post the Pagespeed results and the waterfall from webpagetest.org I might be able to give you some suggestions. If you post or PM the domain name I could tell you more.

 

 

I totally agree on the plugins, I've sent you a PM.


 
 
 
 


15322 posts

Uber Geek


  # 1846375 14-Aug-2017 13:55
Send private message

I use WP Super Cache and find it pretty good. I have used W3TC in the past and it didn't make much difference for me and was also too buggy, and sometimes when I updated the plugin it killed the site with an error, so I had to disable.

 

But things change and plugins fall in and out of favour. 


13 posts

Geek


  # 1846376 14-Aug-2017 13:55
Send private message

The scores on PageSpeed and GT Metrix don't relate to the load time. You could have a website with a low score and load significantly faster than one with a higher score. Many of the suggestions on those tools are also not relevant to most websites e.g using a CDN when the origin server is already close to the target market. Also shaving 7kb off an image won't make any noticeable difference to the load time, as that would only be a tiny fraction of the overall download size.

It's better to focus on what matters; improving the real load time experienced by end users. This can be measured in GT Metrix although I prefer using webpagetest.org. Be sure to choose a location closest to the website's target market to get the most accurate load time and check the waterfall chart to see which requests are having the most impact on the load time and work on improving those.

WP Rocket will do the same job as W3TC but is easier to set up.

Here's what I recommend for getting the most speed out of WordPress websites:
- Make sure you are on fast web host, most shared hosting is simply to slow for a decent sized WordPress website. Ideally the server response or 'time to first byte' should be under 1s without caching.
- Upgrade to PHP7 which has significant performance benefits over previous versions
- Take advantage of http2 - Cloudflare has http2 but most shared hosts in NZ don't offer this. This will require the website to be changed to SSL in order for http2 to be used. http2 allows all files to be downloaded in parallel by the browser instead of 6 at a time, which can really help to get the first load time down. This also means you wouldn't have to worry about combining CSS and JS files in order to reduce the amount of requests.
- Install page caching - Ensure the page cache is set to a decent amount. By default W3TC sets this to 30 minutes, change it to at least 4 hours
- If hosting in NZ Cloudflare won't make a difference to the load time (unless the host doesn't have http2 enabled)
- Remove any unused plugins to cut down on backend processing time

Feel free to add a link to a webpagetest report and I can provide more website specific recommendations.



15549 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

  # 1846390 14-Aug-2017 14:01
Send private message

It's not using CloudFlare. Even if a host offers it I set up manually on the free plan, as that way I really know how it's set up. I've done it a dozen times, maybe more. 

 

Caching headers look fine, so once you put it on CloudFlare it'll be a lot faster in NZ. The main issue looks to be latency between NZ and the web server - from the USA the page load time drops from 4.6 to 2.1 seconds. On CloudFlare it'd used http2 which would further increase performance.

 

If you create a CloudFlare pagerule to "cache everything" the whole site will be delivered from the CloudFlare cache - by default it only caches static resources.

 

Like most themes it wasn't designed with the PageSpeed results in mind. The main way to increase that pagerank would be to rewrite the theme so it did what google wants. I wouldn't bother though. If the idea is to rank in Google time is probably better spent building good quality links.


13 posts

Geek


  # 1846400 14-Aug-2017 14:22
Send private message

timmmay:

 

If you create a CloudFlare pagerule to "cache everything" the whole site will be delivered from the CloudFlare cache - by default it only caches static resources.

 



Obviously you would need to be careful to ensure the dynamic parts of the website and wp-admin aren't cached if the page rules are set to cache everything. It's not normally a simple process to do this.


15549 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

  # 1846426 14-Aug-2017 14:51
Send private message

wpcharged:

 


Obviously you would need to be careful to ensure the dynamic parts of the website and wp-admin aren't cached if the page rules are set to cache everything. It's not normally a simple process to do this.

 

 

Ah yeah, I've done it a dozen times between my websites and customer websites. CloudFlare have instructions for the basic case, you just need to make sure wp-admin is never cached and there rest is "cache everything". Even under "cache everything" expiry headers are still respected, so with a site that changes once a month setting it to 24 hours or even a bit more is probably fine.


 
 
 
 


13 posts

Geek


  # 1846447 14-Aug-2017 15:19
Send private message

timmmay:

 

wpcharged:

 


Obviously you would need to be careful to ensure the dynamic parts of the website and wp-admin aren't cached if the page rules are set to cache everything. It's not normally a simple process to do this.

 

 

Ah yeah, I've done it a dozen times between my websites and customer websites. CloudFlare have instructions for the basic case, you just need to make sure wp-admin is never cached and there rest is "cache everything". Even under "cache everything" expiry headers are still respected, so with a site that changes once a month setting it to 24 hours or even a bit more is probably fine.

 



And you would need to disable the admin bar on the frontend of the website. For anything remotely dynamic (contact forms, ecommerce) it's not really suitable. The Cloudflare guide mentions the 'Bypass Cache on Cookie' option but it's only available on the 200/month plan and the free plan has a limited amount of page rules. There are ways around it by using the expire headers to disable caching but it gets complicated. 

The 'automatic cache' clearing option is a nice feature on that guide though, hadn't seen that before.


15549 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

  # 1846477 14-Aug-2017 16:04
Send private message

I'm only talking about this individual, rarely updated, almost static website. More complex sites will need different rules.

 

On my own Wordpress websites I have Nginx setting caching headers quite precisely based on the cookies and page. CloudFlare respects those headers.

 

I don't tend to worry about the admin bar, since it only appears when an admin logs in. On my websites admin pages are never cached.


1 post

Wannabe Geek
Inactive user


  # 1873866 27-Sep-2017 21:34
Send private message

martyyn:

 

I've got some spare time this week so want to take a closer look at this for my Wordpress sites.

 

My host offers a free Cloudflare setup within Cpanel (which I use with the default settings) and I install W3TC set up as per numerous beginners guides found on the web. It is shared hosting but I pay more for extra CPU, RAM, I/O and a dedicated IP if that makes any difference. The sites are nothing special, they use paid themes, plugins are kept to a minimum and I follow all the obvious stuff with optimising images etc.

 

Pingdom and GTMetrix give me scores of +90% whereas PageSpeed Insights typically gives average scores. A site I've been playing with this morning has 95 on GTMetrix and 63 on PageSpeed.

 

I've read a fair amount of criticism about PageSpeed, ironically by caching blogs, so I'm wondering if I'm wasting my time trying to implement the suggestions anymore than I do now. It may point out something obvious I've missed but it suggested I should shave 7KB off a 73KB image this morning.

 

I'm also reading lots of good things about WP Rocket, so does anyone have any experience with that over W3TC ?

 

 

After reading your question, what I assume that the base of your WordPress website isn’t strong. Most of the WordPress users ignore the hosting environment and start focusing on the front-end optimizations.

 

In shared hosting, you don’t know the actual physical location of your server. The server should be nearest to your targeted audience. As it will reduce the latency between the visitor and server, resulting a faster loading experience.

 

I would suggest to go with a dedicated or cloud provider like Amazon or Google, but they can cost you a bit more. However, you can also go with a Vultr, Linode or DigitalOcean server. All are very cheap. You will be the real owner of your server and the server will be nearest to your targeted audience. Just to let you know, it is a big headache to manage the server, if you don’t know the server side stuff. There are a number of managed hosting providers that manages the server for you like, WPEngine, Kinsta, Cloudways etc. You can go with any of them and forget about the server side headaches.
Once you have a proper setup of the server, then you can focus on the front-end optimizations.

 

The W3TC is one of the top-rated caching plugin, if not configured properly, it can even slows down the site. Due to it’s complexity, many of the WordPress users fails to use it properly.

 

WP Rocket is a good option, but it is paid. It might add a few more bucks in your monthly expenditure.

 

A few days ago, I was reading an article where W3TC was compared with the newest caching plugin “Breeze”. I was curious, how the newest plugin can beat top-rated caching plugin. I also give it a shot, and it proved the claim.
Have a look at here.
https://wpvkp.com/breeze-free-wordpress-cache-plugin/


Create new topic



Twitter and LinkedIn »



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:





News »

Vodafone integrates eSIM into device and wearable roadmap
Posted 17-Jan-2020 09:45


Do you need this camera app? Group investigates privacy implications
Posted 16-Jan-2020 03:30


JBL launches headphones range designed for gaming
Posted 13-Jan-2020 09:59


Withings introduces ScanWatch wearable combining ECG and sleep apnea detection
Posted 9-Jan-2020 18:34


NZ Police releases public app
Posted 8-Jan-2020 11:43


Suunto 7 combine sports and smart features on new smartwatch generation
Posted 7-Jan-2020 16:06


Intel brings innovation with technology spanning the cloud, network, edge and PC
Posted 7-Jan-2020 15:54


AMD announces high performance desktop and ultrathin laptop processors
Posted 7-Jan-2020 15:42


AMD unveils four new desktop and mobile GPUs including AMD Radeon RX 5600
Posted 7-Jan-2020 15:32


Consolidation in video streaming market with Spark selling Lightbox to Sky
Posted 19-Dec-2019 09:09


Intel introduces cryogenic control chip to enable quantum computers
Posted 10-Dec-2019 21:32


Vodafone 5G service live in four cities
Posted 10-Dec-2019 08:30


Samsung Galaxy Fold now available in New Zealand
Posted 6-Dec-2019 00:01


NZ company oDocs awarded US$ 100,000 Dubai World Expo grant
Posted 5-Dec-2019 16:00


New Zealand Rugby Selects AWS-Powered Analytics for Deeper Game Insights
Posted 5-Dec-2019 11:33



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.


Support Geekzone »

Our community of supporters help make Geekzone possible. Click the button below to join them.

Support Geezone on PressPatron



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.