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190 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 2


  Reply # 1894434 2-Nov-2017 20:27
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So how exactly is low level IT support becoming a dying industry?


150 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 25


  Reply # 1894480 3-Nov-2017 00:15
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This may come across as a little harsh but what have you been doing over the past year since you last asked the same question? You mentioned personal circumstances in your OP and not being in a position to think about applying for work but it appears to me that you're focusing on trying to decide which certification to attain rather than just, do it.

 

I started my IT career on an IT SD (IT Service Desk, in case you were wondering) with no IT certifications or qualifications at all. I moved into a Team Leader position after a couple of years and was involved with interviewing for SD vacancy's. During the interviews, we weren't overly interested if the potential candidates had certifications, we were more interested in how the candidate presented themselves. Can they communicate clearly and do they know how to problem solve (you'd be surprised by the amount of people that don't)? How a person reacts and deals with a frustrated person on the other end of the phone is sometimes more important (and harder to teach) than being an expert in what the PC components are called or "how to install and configure display devices".

 

Customers don't care that a blue monitor cable is a VGA cable or how many pins it has. They don't need to know that the "black dongle thing" is a DisplayPort to DVI adapter. All they need to know is, "can someone help to setup their new display thingee?"

 

 

 

Do you have any work experience or formal education?


 
 
 
 




190 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 2


  Reply # 1894963 3-Nov-2017 20:36
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Ruphus:

 

This may come across as a little harsh but what have you been doing over the past year since you last asked the same question? You mentioned personal circumstances in your OP and not being in a position to think about applying for work but it appears to me that you're focusing on trying to decide which certification to attain rather than just, do it.

 

I started my IT career on an IT SD (IT Service Desk, in case you were wondering) with no IT certifications or qualifications at all. I moved into a Team Leader position after a couple of years and was involved with interviewing for SD vacancy's. During the interviews, we weren't overly interested if the potential candidates had certifications, we were more interested in how the candidate presented themselves. Can they communicate clearly and do they know how to problem solve (you'd be surprised by the amount of people that don't)? How a person reacts and deals with a frustrated person on the other end of the phone is sometimes more important (and harder to teach) than being an expert in what the PC components are called or "how to install and configure display devices".

 

Customers don't care that a blue monitor cable is a VGA cable or how many pins it has. They don't need to know that the "black dongle thing" is a DisplayPort to DVI adapter. All they need to know is, "can someone help to setup their new display thingee?"

 

 

 

Do you have any work experience or formal education?

 

 

 

 

Those circumstances are me having a traumatic work accident a few years ago which has ongoing issues. I've spent most of the year seeing specialists seeking adequate treatment. I didn't want this to be about my personal situation but there you have it... It seemed a good idea with the time I have to study something... I did go through a lot of the CompTIA A+ material but I guess here I am again wanting to know if I still heading in the right direction... 

 

I don't how you got into IT with no certifications, was this some time ago? The job market is very different these days...

 

I come from trades working as a painter & decorator. I did a certificate lll in computing a quite a few years ago, most of it was basic and very broad/introductory. I am actually planning to return to part time work to begin with which may not necessarily be IT at all... 

 

 

 

 


269 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 6


  Reply # 1895552 5-Nov-2017 17:24
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I am CompTIA A+ Certified.
I got that on the last year that they did them for life, so I will always have it.
I'm in business for myself, my customers don't actually care whether I have any qualification or not.

 

They just want their PCs and laptops to work

 


I think it still gives a better standing having some certification, especially in NZ as the IT industry is not regulated.
I like the A+ cert, I call it real IT.

 


Today, people have allsorts of flowery IT titles after their names and they know sweet FA about PC repair.

 


MS SQL is something I am interested in also because MYOB use it with their accountant's office software and they have very few well educated support staff.
What was also strange though, I went to the canty university to ask about their IT courses and had a meeting with their course co-ordinator about courses that contain SQL courses or content and he did not know what SQL was and didn't seem to know about Microsoft.

 


I left thinking, is the university going to the pack? I only have an external uni library card and I can't even get any decent books on IT they are years out of date.
Their law section is also not much better either.

 


Comptia and MS certs will always top any of the other IT qualifications, in my opinion.
There will always be a need for IT in some form. 
While Comptia is an external exam I did the training through Auldhouse. It may be different than today, but it was a complete rip off.
The tutor gave us a work book and for the entire week she sat and read out the pages of the book and we paid nearly $3000 for that. The course was supposed to have included the comptia exam. It never did. I ended up going to Computer Power and there IT programs were hands on and we also got access to certificate questions. 
My company was also a Service Centre for Comptia but they changed their pricing structure so its not anymore. I still get sent the Smart Briefs in the emails and they are good reading.
I think they still do security certifications. If I can't do SQL I'll look into that instead

 


Ford




190 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 2


  Reply # 1896341 6-Nov-2017 20:41
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Hi Ford,

 

Thanks for your comments. I think your right in that one of these entry level certs is a good start and proves your genuinely interested. You need these to be able to sit the higher certs anyway...

 

I think the difference is that Auldhouse now charge $10000 instead of $3000!! 

 

The idea for me was to find something to study in the time that I have that would or hopefully should have some benefit when the time is right to apply for an IT related role, or even just work towards if I did manage to land an entry service desk role with no qualifications. I need to look over more job listings to see what certs are being mentioned but I am leaning on MCSA Win 10 over CompTIA A+. Are you looking for change in direction from PC repair or to widen your skill set?




190 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 2


  Reply # 1896394 6-Nov-2017 21:12
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On a side note is Microsoft Office 365 the preferred office software for businesses? I see this one mentioned a lot in job ads. Personally I am used to free software's like Open Office and Libre Office. 


269 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 6


  Reply # 1896438 6-Nov-2017 21:53
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There's always more IT skills to learn. certainly having at least a basic skill set will hold you in good stead. 

 

I intially got into IT because I just had a facination with it. And people always ask me to fix their PC's. Small businesses tend to not have dedicated IT people. So they are my target market.

 

I like networks and security because they can be specialized. Today there are alot more things that can be connected so thats more things that can go wrong.

 

Connectivity and security are something that we will always need to be on top of.

 

I also have interest from a private investor. So I'm looking to IT products and services that will be around for a long time.

 

Regarding Office 365. My customers still use stand alone office products.

 

Cloud based products usually mean paying a regular subscription, and they do take away some of the IT repair work. They also mean signing a contract. And some of the terms are very ugly and contain nastys like privacy waivers.

 

Cloud services do take away some IT work. Think about the accounting software Xero for example, if the product breaks then Xero fix it.

 

I also work in the chartered accounting industry and it always surprises me how many people still do not use computers. We have customers who write out by hand their cash books and have difficulty with attaching documents to emails. I have found there is more of a need nowdays in training people as we become more reliant on computers and technology. 

 

IT is always a great career choice in my opinion, certaintly it can have its ugly downsides of course. But for me I will never regret entering into the field.

 

I love it with all my heart:) now and forever.

 

 


180 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 23


  Reply # 1896518 7-Nov-2017 07:14
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Kol12:

 

On a side note is Microsoft Office 365 the preferred office software for businesses? I see this one mentioned a lot in job ads. Personally I am used to free software's like Open Office and Libre Office. 

 

 

 

 

Yes. And you should really spend some time understanding the difference between it and Open Office/Libre Office. It's quite massive.


1448 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 351


  Reply # 1896655 7-Nov-2017 10:25
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Kol12:

So how exactly is low level IT support becoming a dying industry?

think cloud services and thin clients.

1253 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 256


  Reply # 1897421 8-Nov-2017 10:58
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Kol12:

 

So how exactly is low level IT support becoming a dying industry?

 

 

PC's & laptops are now seen as throw away items
eg : People will often upgrade to new rather than replace a dead hard drive
labor costs making repairs uneconomic , when low end PC/laptops can be had for $500-$700
Companies see their systems as setup & ignore, and do not want ongoing IT maintenance options . Even servers
in small business are sometimes seen as something to ignore all maintenance on till something fails (yes, thats the real world)
Win, MS Office, PC's etc being more reliable than ever (in general)
Low end IT Techs unable to find jobs after being laid off

 

And low level being PC/workstation & server : ie jack of all trades
Just comparing to how it was 15 years ago , the downward trend is obvious

 

 

 

 

 

 


1253 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 256


  Reply # 1897425 8-Nov-2017 11:05
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Kol12:

 

On a side note is Microsoft Office 365 the preferred office software for businesses? I see this one mentioned a lot in job ads. Personally I am used to free software's like Open Office and Libre Office. 

 

 

You really need to consider what 365 actually is , in the small bus workplace.
Its not just Word, Excel etc

 

Its also hosted email, hosted sharepoint/file sharing etc etc
Open Office & Libre are hardly ever used in buseness's . MS Office(& 365) experience is what you need.


137 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 6


  Reply # 1897791 8-Nov-2017 20:22
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1101:

 

Kol12:

 

So how exactly is low level IT support becoming a dying industry?

 

 

PC's & laptops are now seen as throw away items
eg : People will often upgrade to new rather than replace a dead hard drive
labor costs making repairs uneconomic , when low end PC/laptops can be had for $500-$700
Companies see their systems as setup & ignore, and do not want ongoing IT maintenance options . Even servers
in small business are sometimes seen as something to ignore all maintenance on till something fails (yes, thats the real world)
Win, MS Office, PC's etc being more reliable than ever (in general)
Low end IT Techs unable to find jobs after being laid off

 

And low level being PC/workstation & server : ie jack of all trades
Just comparing to how it was 15 years ago , the downward trend is obvious

 

 

Hence my view that computer repair is going "rust belt", just as TV repair went some years back.


54 posts

Master Geek


  Reply # 1909297 29-Nov-2017 07:59
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Ruphus:

 

This may come across as a little harsh but what have you been doing over the past year since you last asked the same question? You mentioned personal circumstances in your OP and not being in a position to think about applying for work but it appears to me that you're focusing on trying to decide which certification to attain rather than just, do it.

 

I started my IT career on an IT SD (IT Service Desk, in case you were wondering) with no IT certifications or qualifications at all. I moved into a Team Leader position after a couple of years and was involved with interviewing for SD vacancy's. During the interviews, we weren't overly interested if the potential candidates had certifications, we were more interested in how the candidate presented themselves. Can they communicate clearly and do they know how to problem solve (you'd be surprised by the amount of people that don't)? How a person reacts and deals with a frustrated person on the other end of the phone is sometimes more important (and harder to teach) than being an expert in what the PC components are called or "how to install and configure display devices".

 

Customers don't care that a blue monitor cable is a VGA cable or how many pins it has. They don't need to know that the "black dongle thing" is a DisplayPort to DVI adapter. All they need to know is, "can someone help to setup their new display thingee?"

 

 

 

Do you have any work experience or formal education?

 

 

 

 

I got into the industry the same way as you pretty much, but that was in the early 2000's when it was a lot eaiser to get your foot in if the only experience you had was tinkering around with computers in your own time etc rather than a formal qual

 

These days, from what i've seen/heard from entry level guys, it aint like that anymore.  However a bit of actual exp will always help, even if you set up a little home lab with an eval copy of windows server and hyper-v and set up an AD environment, have a play with GPO's, DNS, DHCP, various server roles and features etc.  You should also become familar with Azure and AWS, they both have a free tier you can play with.  Even though on prem server infrastructure is also dying a slow death as companies move to AWS/Azure and the like, its still going to give you a good grounding. 


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