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Topic # 95334 31-Dec-2011 03:19
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So I just graduated this year and I have being applying and going to interviews without much luck,

just want to know how the market is, since there are lots of I.T Pros in this forum.

I have my Information systems degree and I am looking for I.T support work or networking/systems administration/engineering work.

Also what would the average starting salary be for jobs like that if you are a grad?

Also what are the average I.T salaries going around these days?

I looked at the trade me jobs research and other research but I do not think its accurate.

Thanks in Advanced.

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  Reply # 563386 1-Jan-2012 01:44
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Good to see fresh blood coming into the industry :)

I've also got a info systems / management degree, started on <$40K in '07.

If earning $$ is your primary goal then you'll need to be a quick learner and UNI teaches you nothing practical. It's also really importantly foster good working relationships with both clients and colleagues, if you don't you may as well engrave your name on your desk as you won't be going anywhere soon.

Hayes publishes a list of the average salaries per industry role, don't take it too seriously but it will at least give you a ball-park figure of what you could expect in a few years.





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  Reply # 563417 1-Jan-2012 10:03
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Like insane says, the Hays salary guide is good - http://www.hays.net.nz/salary/

I also like the careers.govt.nz site which gives you good info as well as pay. Click on the Job Database menu and drill down to a specific job e.g - http://www.careers.govt.nz/default.aspx?id0=60103&id1=J80335

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  Reply # 564222 4-Jan-2012 10:02
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+1 for the advice so far.

Salary guides for IT (good for a rough idea, don't treat them as gospel):
http://www.trademe.co.nz/jobs/salary-guide/it.htm
http://www.itsalaries.co.nz/content/IT%20Salary%20Report_Aug-2011.pdf
http://www.hays.com.au/salary/output/pdf2011/HaysSalaryGuide_2011-AU_it.pdf

$40-50k sounds about right for a competent grad in Auckland or Wellington, other regions probably slightly lower.

Hit the major job sites for an idea of what jobs are listed at the moment (note: Listings will probably more numerous after the holiday period):
www.seek.co.nz
www.trademe.co.nz/jobs

Pick two or three quality recruitment agencies and sign up with them (not too many, you don't want to be put forward for the same job by two companies that's a bad look) as some companies deal only via agencies and don't list on job sites.

I've used Hays, RecruitIT, AbsoluteIT, Lloyd Executive.







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  Reply # 564251 4-Jan-2012 11:05
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what can a grad make after 1 year after bring hired as a grad? i heard it goes up by along way since you learn alot.

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  Reply # 564863 5-Jan-2012 15:38
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zxd123: what can a grad make after 1 year after bring hired as a grad? i heard it goes up by along way since you learn alot.


Depends on the company, most have some kind of performance review / pay rise system... others you need to be more proactive and remind your boss that you've been there a year and how about a pay rise sort of thing.

With inflation generally being 2-3% you normally want 5% pay rise / year (within reason) or you're going backwards and you should start looking elsewhere.

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  Reply # 564899 5-Jan-2012 16:32
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zxd123: what can a grad make after 1 year after bring hired as a grad? i heard it goes up by along way since you learn alot.


Usually round a 5-10k jump, depending on whether you are a fast learner and get promoted a bit

All good info above, the 40-50k starting rate is about right(most probably on 40k)
 
Just try not to delude yourself, I know a lot of people(myself this included) got fed a load of rubbish from their lecturers at uni about how their degree was worthwhile etc.  But to be honest, on the job training and experience is worth more.  If I could have started in the IT field 4 years earlier and skipped my degree I would have!

Just be prepared to learn fast and up skill fast and you'll do well!  if you are in it more for the money than for the fun(as a lot are)  go the fast route: helpdesk, junior BA, project manager and you'll get into the 6 figures within a few years if you really want to do it that way

 




I have moved across the ditch.  Now residing in Melbourne as a VOIP/Video Technical Trainer/Engineer. 

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  Reply # 564913 5-Jan-2012 17:00
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Sadly you seldom get big pay raises via an annual pay review (unless you work for the earthquake commission), or have some unique skill your employer needs and you threaten to leave.

If you want to make great strides you need to keep up skilling yourself, promotions / opportunities etc then just follow naturally, and they really do ;)

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  Reply # 564917 5-Jan-2012 17:08
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Totally agree with that(Insane post above)

I like the times when you are invited to come in and "close the door".

First thoughts are, what have I done wrong.

Then they produce a remuneration and promotion letter :)

Work hard and don't put up too much resistance, even if the tasks at hand seem mundane. Always put new ideas forward and show initiative.

If you think something will benefit the company, or make the jobs of those around you easier. Write it up and present it to the manager. The worst they can do is tell you they don't have the funds for it. Most of the time they'll accept it as a new project though

Edit:

Forgot to add, if you only just graduated, don't expect a job to fall into your hands immediately afterwards.  it took me 3-4 months(March 2006) to get my first job, after finishing in December 2005

It might take slightly longer, just bear in mind that the job market is hard. There are a lot of skilled employees also looking for work.  

You basically have to make yourself stand out.  Go into an interview and be confident.  But not overconfident(viewed as arrogant).  Tell them that while you may not have the experience, you are willing to learn.  Keep making the point that you are willing to learn.  

When I was on an interview panel a couple of years ago, we ended up taking the person who seemed willing to learn and with not much IT knowledge.  Over the person who had obviously been in the same job at a previous company and seemed arrogant and like they already knew it all.

 




I have moved across the ditch.  Now residing in Melbourne as a VOIP/Video Technical Trainer/Engineer. 

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  Reply # 564945 5-Jan-2012 18:57
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I started as a system engineer on $23k back in 1995.  Below average salary at the time but it took me less than 2 years to move to $40k within the same company.  The trick was to work hard but also work smart, learn as much as you can, not only from on job learning but especially from your peers and senior peers.  They are your best mentors no degree will ever be able to give you.  My advise is experience should be worth more than $$$ when you are starting out. After 2 years you can look for more $$$.

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  Reply # 565499 6-Jan-2012 20:13
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If you long term ambition is to move into Management, then don't discount obtaining an IT Degree form a reputable tertiary institution. I say reputable deliberately, as we have had a couple of applicants (albeit for technical positions), who had degrees from unaccredited internet-based universities! 

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  Reply # 566534 9-Jan-2012 15:21
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Correct me if i am wrong, but chances are your info sys degree doesn't teach you much about server and network administration/support. Without the knowledge or experience in these areas I think it will be quite difficult to land a network admin/support job straight out of uni, as there are tons of other candidates out there competing against you.

If the above is the case then you might want to look for a job at an ISP (I know, it's a routine job). It might not give you the necessary IT skills but they pay alright and it does give you that job experience and customer service skills that your next employer is looking for. Stay for 6 months or ideally for a year and during the time, studying a vendor cert or two. Whether it is Cisco, Microsoft, VMware etc... This shows that you willing to learn and it also give you something to distinguish yourself in your next interview.

Once you finally get yourself into the IT industry, continue on with where your passion lies and keep on studying for the certs (even if you have to self study). In reality very few employer are willing to folk out $5k to send an employee to training, it does happen but not that often. Waiting for paid for training is just going to slow you down.

The reason why I keep on emphasising on getting certifications is that apart from actual performance, this is the easiest way to distinguish yourself amongst others in the company and other candidates when you are applying for jobs. It shows that you are motivated and passionate about what you do. The certs are helpful in reviews and interviews. It certainly does fast tracked my career. It gives your employer no reason for not offering you better terms.

I got my com sci degree back in 06 (which i guess is similar to your degree), doing the above works very well for me. 


 

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  Reply # 566565 9-Jan-2012 16:39
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Started in 2002 on 23k, left 4 years later on 55k - now contracting for a whole lot more.

I didn't do the whole Uni thing but know people that have. As people have mentioned don't expect a lot of respect because you have a degree. Experience trumps all in most cases.

Not all doom and gloom. If you interview well (plenty of guides out there) and keep at it you shouldn't have too much trouble. From the looks of it you're doing your research so be realistic about salary. There is absolutely fantastic money in IT - but don't expect it to fall from the sky straight away.

Attitude and social skills are the key to advancement early on. Do the stuff you are asked without bitching and you'll normally get offered the better stuff soon enough. Graduates that come into a company thinking they are hot stuff because they have a degree are universally reviled by pretty much anyone. Be honest, ask questions and don't assume you know more than the guy that's been there 5 years.

From a career viewpoint - I wouldn't expect to spend a lot of time in one place. Longest I have worked in one job is 4 years. You will find that the people that change every 1-3 years end up on significantly better money and usually are more talented (generally, not counting useless people that job hop because they are bad at their job).

I was lucky to start in a small company (10 people, now 60+). That allowed me to learn a lot and advance very quickly in a short period. If you do end up at a call center/larger organisation you tend to have less flexibility and opportunities.

 Good luck! Stay positive.

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