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  Reply # 1411193 22-Oct-2015 15:50
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sbiddle: 

With copper it's simple as it's a single MPF exists between the cabinet/exchange and the customer. With fibre passive equipment such as splitters in the field it makes a 3rd party deployment of GPON gear much more complex, and with the very different network architectures between the different LFCs it also adds to that.



Yup, copper wasn't particularly easy either. Had its own challenges (Multizone MDF's, Comsic frames, cabnets, SLES/SLU etc).



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  Reply # 1411204 22-Oct-2015 15:53
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Nebbie:
graemeh: 
Off site backups can max out the 50mb upload.

Can you even buy consumer devices with a 10gig port on them?

Imagine what a 10 gig router must cost!
Yes offsite backups can max out 50mbit bandwidth however this is unattended traffic I could list many things that "could" max out a 50mbit connection but just because we can max it out doesn't mean this is the reason why we need 10gbit.

However $50 per month Unlimited 1gig fibre is unrealistic, a realistic price I would say is actually around $150-$200 this allows RSP's to actually make a profit. Dunedin for example has been a nightmare, its not just about the end user there's business to make profits.


I totally agree and I'd say $50 per month for any fibre service is probably unrealistic.

Not only does the ISP have to make a profit they also need to have the money to spend on their infrastructure so that we can actually have a chance of using the speed that our fibre has been provisioned at.

I don't know how Big Pipe manage to do 100/20 fibre at $79, but they do and I'm very happy with it.

People don't know how lucky they are, when I was young we used to send data on floppy disks in shoe boxes, there were no modems for us. cool

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  Reply # 1411269 22-Oct-2015 17:55
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UFB is set for unbundling as of 2020
ISPs will be able to rent the fibres / microducts and put in their own equipment giving them almost a hands off control, but total visibility of the network by putting their own optical equipment at each end of the fiber.




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  Reply # 1411313 22-Oct-2015 18:43
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" Would we be better off without UFB?"

NO

Previously I paid $75 for 10/1 DSL+POTS with a 40GB cap now I pay $90 for 100/20 no data cap and phone [via Fibre] including voice mail etc


One of the best proactive things I have seen any govt do





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  Reply # 1411406 22-Oct-2015 21:10
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A weird thread, I might start one on are we better with slower computers. 

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  Reply # 1411438 22-Oct-2015 22:31
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tdgeek: A weird thread, I might start one on are we better with slower computers. 


A calculator got the americans to the moon
Learning to do more, with less, can be fun.




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There is no place like localhost
For my general guide to extending your wireless network Click Here






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  Reply # 1411444 22-Oct-2015 22:52
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Aredwood:

I see the fibre build as the most important network build of this century. It could be compared to the rollout of the electricity network early last century. I bet there were people at the time who said that it is not necessary. And that a coal stove, and kerosene lanterns provide all the required heating, lighting and cooking. But just as people from the 1920s would never have been able to imagine the things that we now plug into power sockets today. In 100 years time we will be using the UFB network for things we would never have dreamed of today.


Totally agree that fibre could be one of the most important infrastructure projects of our times. I just wonder if it could be done better.

Today finally finished connecting up a customer who signed up in December last year. And it's a frustrated 10 months for all involved. This isn't an isolated incident, I'm sure every one of you have similar stories.

Is this the best we can do? Is it too much to ask for a network company that gives you accurate information, connects you up quickly, and does what it says it will do?

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  Reply # 1411476 23-Oct-2015 02:28
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DarkShadow:
Aredwood:

I see the fibre build as the most important network build of this century. It could be compared to the rollout of the electricity network early last century. I bet there were people at the time who said that it is not necessary. And that a coal stove, and kerosene lanterns provide all the required heating, lighting and cooking. But just as people from the 1920s would never have been able to imagine the things that we now plug into power sockets today. In 100 years time we will be using the UFB network for things we would never have dreamed of today.


Totally agree that fibre could be one of the most important infrastructure projects of our times. I just wonder if it could be done better.

Today finally finished connecting up a customer who signed up in December last year. And it's a frustrated 10 months for all involved. This isn't an isolated incident, I'm sure every one of you have similar stories.

Is this the best we can do? Is it too much to ask for a network company that gives you accurate information, connects you up quickly, and does what it says it will do?



I think the biggest problem is around the area of consents.  Getting every neighbour to sign is very complicated in many cases. 

I don't think it could have been done much better for the same cost though. I was sceptical of the approach before the rollout but have changed my mind. 

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  Reply # 1412959 23-Oct-2015 18:01
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Feel sorry for the poor old Aussies, who's NBN is a true giant clusterfudge. 

Or the poor yanks who don't live in one of the few places with Google Fiber or a community/city provider that's offering good services. One of the Cisco Academy papers  I did in the last 12 months required me to research broadband options in the US, and most places you get monopolies and very very big bills for very crap service.




Information wants to be free. The Net interprets censorship as damage and routes around it.

 

Thinking about signing up to BigPipe? Get $20 credit with my referral link.


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  Reply # 1412962 23-Oct-2015 18:09
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DarkShadow:
Aredwood:

I see the fibre build as the most important network build of this century. It could be compared to the rollout of the electricity network early last century. I bet there were people at the time who said that it is not necessary. And that a coal stove, and kerosene lanterns provide all the required heating, lighting and cooking. But just as people from the 1920s would never have been able to imagine the things that we now plug into power sockets today. In 100 years time we will be using the UFB network for things we would never have dreamed of today.


Totally agree that fibre could be one of the most important infrastructure projects of our times. I just wonder if it could be done better.

Today finally finished connecting up a customer who signed up in December last year. And it's a frustrated 10 months for all involved. This isn't an isolated incident, I'm sure every one of you have similar stories.

Is this the best we can do? Is it too much to ask for a network company that gives you accurate information, connects you up quickly, and does what it says it will do?




Forgot to add in my last post - When there is no consents involved UFB can be installed really quickly. In my own case, exactly 1 week between ordering it from Snap (now 2degrees) and having it all working. And there was still a hiccup in my install. The ONT was installed but there was no optical connection. The Chorus tech's had to go to the exchange and do something there to fix it. (I think they just had to plug the other end of the fibre into the OLT. As it didn't take them long to get it working. And I was the first install on my street).

And there was another thread on here where someone said that they got a full UFB install in just 4 days. So I think it is the usual case of hearing about all the bad installs but not the good ones.





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  Reply # 1413023 23-Oct-2015 21:16
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darkasdes2:
Lias: The only real gripe I have with the current setup is I believe the LFC's should all be non profits or community trusts. In my view there is no place for profit in a government granted monopoly of an essential service.







Enable in Christchurch is owned by the Christchurch city council.

It's a shame that more LFCs are not like that


And Ultrafast is owned by WEL networks who is owned by a trust and Northpower Fibre is owned by NorthPwer who is also owned by a trust.
So that appears to make Chorus the only LFC that is not community owned.

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  Reply # 1413157 24-Oct-2015 13:14
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Lias: Feel sorry for the poor old Aussies, who's NBN is a true giant clusterfudge. 

Or the poor yanks who don't live in one of the few places with Google Fiber or a community/city provider that's offering good services. One of the Cisco Academy papers  I did in the last 12 months required me to research broadband options in the US, and most places you get monopolies and very very big bills for very crap service.


Unfortunately, the community/city providers are being fought left, right and centre by the major carriers such as Comcast.

What's interesting is that the general opinion of the NZ public still appears to be that we have a "third world" internet service, charging premium prices, in comparison to North America. Hopefully that will slowly start changing as people recognise the impact the UFB project has made.

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  Reply # 1432028 21-Nov-2015 02:55
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DarkShadow:


You only need look at the likes of the US to see how anything other than what we have works out for it's customers to many chefs spoil the broth, 1 Chef (aka Chorus) + many waiters (aka ISP's) = A great dining experience (aka Internet) and that is really all customers want

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