Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.


304 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 28


Topic # 87726 5-Aug-2011 06:00
Send private message

"It appears the new file-sharing law will target anyone who uses P2P software, even if it's legitimate use."

http://gracefool.posterous.com/from-next-week-p2p-in-new-zealand-is-illegal (via reddit)

Apparently some rightsholders are using the BitTorrent DHT (distributed hash table) to find infringing users. This is terrible practice, because a BitTorrent client, simply by running (even if it has never downloaded or uploaded anything, let alone anything infringing), participates in the DHT and passes on information about which peer to get files from - and some of those files may be infringing. A rightsholder using this method can't distinguish between clients simply participating in the DHT, and those actually sharing the file.


  
Relevant comment from 3strikesNZ's Facebook page:
3strikesNZ: Couple of months ago, InternetNZ got an email from CBS saying we had illegally downloaded an episode of The Good Wife. On investigation we found P2P software running on a test server. It had got a request for that TV show, didn't have it (in fact it didn't have anything on it) but helpfully pointed the ping to others. This was interpreted as us having the file and would have resulted in a notice under the new law.

If I'm reading this right, if you're running a BitTorrent client, regardless if you're actually torrenting anything, leaving DHT enabled could be enough for you to be falsely accused of sharing copyrighted files via P2P?

So legal torrenting could still put you in hot water, if DHT is enabled. 




Creator of Tallowmere.

Create new topic
12 posts

Geek


  Reply # 502229 5-Aug-2011 07:23
Send private message

I think that is blown out of proportion and not accurate for how DHT works. The article does afterall start "apparently..." and the author now notes in the comments "Update: This doesn't seem to be at all common - it may have happened a few times, but you're unlikely to be caught this way. My bad for overstating the case."

afaik, the client doesn't "harbour illegal file info" - it knows nothing of the actual offending files. It does know about nodes for the DHT to work - the other parts of the network NOT the files. In other words, it's like routers on the internet - a packet knows what it wants, but needs directions to its destination and so gets bumped closer to the next node/router. None of this traffic is actually parts of the file being transferred - that happens once a direct connection is established between seed and peer and at that point no longer needs DHT for the transfer to proceed.

P2P and running a torrent client is not illegal. Actually seeding or downloading copyrighted content without the rights to do so is illegal.

Anyway, if you're that paranoid, why not just disable DHT in your client? Most private tackers do this by default anyway.

My 2c.




304 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 28


  Reply # 502234 5-Aug-2011 07:36
Send private message

Right, no file parts get transmitted, just info about where to go to find the files.

But it sounds like this tiny bit of directional info was the basis for issuing an infringement notice?

Uncommon perhaps, but never say never...




Creator of Tallowmere.

4412 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1924

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 502237 5-Aug-2011 07:55
Send private message

And the burden of proof is on *you* to show that there was *no* infringement. That's why the law is such a bad one.




iPad Air + iPhone SE + 2degrees 4tw!

These comments are my own and do not represent the opinions of 2degrees.


8025 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 387

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 502437 5-Aug-2011 14:05
Send private message

Fairly common/easy to disable DHT in your torrent client, usually required if using a private tracker anyway.

Create new topic

Twitter »

Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:





News »

Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central launches
Posted 10-Jul-2018 10:40


Spark completes first milestone in voice platform upgrade
Posted 10-Jul-2018 09:36


Microsoft ices heated developers
Posted 6-Jul-2018 20:16


PB Technologies charged for its extended warranties and warned for bait advertising
Posted 3-Jul-2018 15:45


Almost 20,000 people claim credits from Spark
Posted 29-Jun-2018 10:40


Cove sells NZ's first insurance policy via chatbot
Posted 25-Jun-2018 10:04


N4L helping TAKA Trust bridge the digital divide for Lower Hutt students
Posted 18-Jun-2018 13:08


Winners Announced for 2018 CIO Awards
Posted 18-Jun-2018 13:03


Logitech Rally sets new standard for USB-connected video conference cameras
Posted 18-Jun-2018 09:27


Russell Stanners steps down as Vodafone NZ CEO
Posted 12-Jun-2018 09:13


Intergen recognised as 2018 Microsoft Country Partner of the Year for New Zealand
Posted 12-Jun-2018 08:00


Finalists Announced For Microsoft NZ Partner Awards
Posted 6-Jun-2018 15:12


Vocus Group and Vodafone announce joint venture to accelerate fibre innovation
Posted 5-Jun-2018 10:52


Kogan.com to launch Kogan Mobile in New Zealand
Posted 4-Jun-2018 14:34


Enable doubles fibre broadband speeds for its most popular wholesale service in Christchurch
Posted 2-Jun-2018 20:07



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.