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  Reply # 1626368 9-Sep-2016 10:09
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lquify:

 

they are OTA phone updates. 2degrees and Vodafone have released software updates but Spark hasnt. it will be the August security patch updates i guess.

 

nothing to do with the recall or anything.

 

 

So no good to anyone right now - all N7s have been handed back (or should have been) and no new ones being sold at this time. 


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  Reply # 1626428 9-Sep-2016 11:04
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eracode:

 

lquify:

 

they are OTA phone updates. 2degrees and Vodafone have released software updates but Spark hasnt. it will be the August security patch updates i guess.

 

nothing to do with the recall or anything.

 

 

So no good to anyone right now - all N7s have been handed back (or should have been) and no new ones being sold at this time. 

 

 

 

 

Apple will be laughing all the way to the bank on this one.






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  Reply # 1626443 9-Sep-2016 11:43
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If you see how Samsung are handling this in contrast to how Apple handled Antenna gate... I'd say kudos Samsung

Samsung :
- $1600 price tag (pre-order came with a 128gb micro sdxc and a Gear VR worth roughly around $320 all up)
- Identfied problem and issued recall within 2 weeks
- provided replacement 2016 J5 (roughly $400) yours to keep

Apple:
- No extras at pre-order
- flat out denied any issues - said people were holding it wrong
- eventually caved to public pressure but instead of a recall for a defective phone, they sent a tacky looking bumper case (roughly $30 value)

Whilst I can understand a battery issue is more severe, the way Samsung is handling this is well above par.

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  Reply # 1626447 9-Sep-2016 11:47
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VKoil: Whilst I can understand a battery issue is more severe, the way Samsung is handling this is well above par.

 

i think the intention has been good but the excecution has been poor. whilst it's an urgent matter they still rushed it a little too much. ah well, sh1t happens. looking forward to getting my new phone.


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  Reply # 1626449 9-Sep-2016 11:49
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lquify:

 

VKoil: Whilst I can understand a battery issue is more severe, the way Samsung is handling this is well above par.

 

i think the intention has been good but the excecution has been poor. whilst it's an urgent matter they still rushed it a little too much. ah well, sh1t happens. looking forward to getting my new phone.

 

 

They've said upto 4 weeks

 

So I am taking the maximum for that

 

In that case 1 week down, 3 more to go before getting a brand new awesome phone


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  Reply # 1626512 9-Sep-2016 12:44
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VKoil: If you see how Samsung are handling this in contrast to how Apple handled Antenna gate... I'd say kudos Samsung

Samsung :
- $1600 price tag (pre-order came with a 128gb micro sdxc and a Gear VR worth roughly around $320 all up)
- Identfied problem and issued recall within 2 weeks
- provided replacement 2016 J5 (roughly $400) yours to keep

Apple:
- No extras at pre-order
- flat out denied any issues - said people were holding it wrong
- eventually caved to public pressure but instead of a recall for a defective phone, they sent a tacky looking bumper case (roughly $30 value)

Whilst I can understand a battery issue is more severe, the way Samsung is handling this is well above par.

 

 

 

I agree that they are handling it well and that the issue in the global scheme of things is actually pretty small.

 

However, they will lose sales to Apple especially if airlines start banning the Note in any significant way and that sort of thing. Anyone who was wavering between an iPhone and a Note may well be tipped in the iPhone direction as a result.

 

It will be interesting to see whether Samsung have to do any additional incentive offers post-batterygate to get sales moving back towards targets.








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  Reply # 1626522 9-Sep-2016 13:01
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@geektastic: Some airlines are banning the charging of N7s in flight - not banning them outright on board.


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  Reply # 1626527 9-Sep-2016 13:03
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eracode:

 

@geektastic: Some airlines are banning the charging of N7s in flight - not banning them outright on board.

 

 

 

 

Although I did read that if there was an official rather than voluntary recall the FAA in the US would ban them from being taken on board. Not sure if that remains the case.








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  Reply # 1626531 9-Sep-2016 13:09
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Geektastic:

 

eracode:

 

@geektastic: Some airlines are banning the charging of N7s in flight - not banning them outright on board.

 

 

 

 

Although I did read that if there was an official rather than voluntary recall the FAA in the US would ban them from being taken on board. Not sure if that remains the case.

 

 

I re-read the Engadget story that I posted above - and you're right. Aussie airlines say 'no powering-up or charging on board'.

 

It does also say that if it was a 'formal' recall by Samsung you would probably not be able to take them on board at all - even in checked-in luggage.


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  Reply # 1626549 9-Sep-2016 13:28
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The airline ban is going to be hard to enforce... Will it be a temporary ban until Samsung rectifies the issue or a permanent ban?

Also having had a look at the iPhone 7 plus, the price point starts higher than an iPad pro. The 128gb model is $1630 which is higher than the note. The 256gb is $1830. That's ludicrous.

Overall I think Samsung is offering a more compelling option - more productivity, expandable storage, higher screen resolution (which ties in nicely with VR - which is amazing by the way)

At this point the only reason to stay with Apple is if you've invested a lot into their ecosystem. I don't think the ease of use is an excuse anymore to go with Apple. Apple's so called "simplicity" comes at the price of absent features.

Though, in saying that, it will still sell millions because... Consumerism... That's why. Most people care more about the brand than the features their products offer.

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  Reply # 1626601 9-Sep-2016 15:40
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Apples simplicity is the main reason for its ease of use. When you go adding features and settings beyond the consumers capability, its easy for them to get lost, make mistakes, inhibit the full potential of the device. I have seen many get so fustrated with devices they could not operate that they give up. Sure they could be naive and inattentive. But these types of products offer a simplicity that a consumer can use and is all they need for everyday chours.

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  Reply # 1626603 9-Sep-2016 15:49
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I'm not a fanboy, and would have happily opted for an iphone or another manufacturer if they had been offering something I thought was a better fit for my use cases when I bought the Note. Then the battery thing happened. If you critique it from a "This should never have happened" perspective, that's true. But once a technology becomes sufficiently complex, it becomes impossible to completely eliminate the possibility of problems. Since that's always true (the new iPhone may yet have issues, past ones have), the way the company reacts to problems becomes a major decision factor.

 

When you think of the many recorded instances of car makers, drug companies, etc., being caught lying about dangerous flaws in their products, the reaction to this problem by a phone company (yeah, I know they do other things, but in this context...) is remarkable. They didn't rush to blame the customer, but investigated the reports, and immediately admitted their fault. They immediately started a well-funded recall, including (in our market) handing out free replacements and (in other markets) paying for accessories, etc. The statistical likelihood of any single phone failing catastrophically is  extremely small, and there are all kinds of shifty corporate 'strategies' they could have used to try to minimize the cost of doing this. Instead, they seem to have tried to actually do the right thing - the confusion about who-gets-what-how is annoying, but in terms of the logistics of the effort, it's probably not avoidable. I think Samsung are probably doing as good a job as possible, given the constraints. 

 

As for shipping the units with a faulty part, it should never have happened; and they're going to pay a huge price for it in direct costs, brand value, and market share. Hopefully the lessons in this about quality control will resonate through the industry. Since it came to light, though, I'm inclined to say - not a foot wrong. 

 

 

 

Thoughts? Just my perspective...


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  Reply # 1626608 9-Sep-2016 16:05
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Thoughts.
Mostly yes.
However, i am not sure they completely made the right decision. It may have been, the only decision. This type of manufacturer fault is potentially in all phones outside of china & hong kong. 35 phones now may turn into 100 later and perhaps exponentially more later on. At some point the consumer product safety commission would have stepped in and enforced a ban on sales and demanded a investigation. This would have been damaging to samsung and i believe they avoided this by doing the only thing they could.
The right decision yes, but about the only one they had.
Granted they do appear to be looking after us as best they can. I mean in order to provide us with future products they must survive as a company.

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  Reply # 1626614 9-Sep-2016 16:24
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VKoil: The airline ban is going to be hard to enforce... Will it be a temporary ban until Samsung rectifies the issue or a permanent ban?

Also having had a look at the iPhone 7 plus, the price point starts higher than an iPad pro. The 128gb model is $1630 which is higher than the note. The 256gb is $1830. That's ludicrous.

Overall I think Samsung is offering a more compelling option - more productivity, expandable storage, higher screen resolution (which ties in nicely with VR - which is amazing by the way)

At this point the only reason to stay with Apple is if you've invested a lot into their ecosystem. I don't think the ease of use is an excuse anymore to go with Apple. Apple's so called "simplicity" comes at the price of absent features.

Though, in saying that, it will still sell millions because... Consumerism... That's why. Most people care more about the brand than the features their products offer.

 

It will be VERY hard to enforce.

 

For starters it takes a keen eye to tell the difference between an S7 Edge and a Note 7 - they are pretty similar on a casual glance.  And once the issue is fixed, why should Note 7's be banned any more than anything else? Apple had a laptop battery issue IIRC (some time ago) and I do not see them checking every bit of luggage just in case you have one of those that was affected.






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  Reply # 1626617 9-Sep-2016 16:36
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Geektastic:

 

It will be VERY hard to enforce.

 

For starters it takes a keen eye to tell the difference between an S7 Edge and a Note 7 - they are pretty similar on a casual glance.  And once the issue is fixed, why should Note 7's be banned any more than anything else? Apple had a laptop battery issue IIRC (some time ago) and I do not see them checking every bit of luggage just in case you have one of those that was affected.

 

 

 

 

Not so hard.

 

All they would have to do is say that <item X> is added to the list of prohibited/restricted baggage items. Might be hard to *enforce*, but it will put the risk on the person carrying it.

 

That said, it's virtually impossible that they would ban ALL of a model of a phone from a major company. More likely they might restrict pre-recall models, and maybe restrict use, rather than possession.


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