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Mad Scientist
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  Reply # 1663706 4-Nov-2016 12:19
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Ouch!


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  Reply # 1663753 4-Nov-2016 13:30
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Just received:

 

 

For safety reasons the New Zealand Telecommunications industry, in co-ordination with Samsung, is blacklisting any Samsung Note 7 mobile phones still held by customers, from 18 November.

 

This means that Samsung Note 7’s will not be able to be used across any of New Zealand’s mobile networks, after 18 November.

 

New Zealand Telecommunications Forum (TCF) CEO Geoff Thorn says this is a further safety measure by the carriers to ensure everything is being done to assist with the recall process.

 

"Numerous attempts by all providers have been made to contact owners and ask them to bring the phones in for replacement or refund, this action should further aid the return of the remaining handsets."

 

The TCF provides a free public service which allows consumers to easily check whether a mobile phone has been blacklisted.  Each mobile phone has a unique identifying number called an IMEI number and if this number is blacklisted the phone will not operate on any mobile network in New Zealand.

 

Samsung has issued a world-wide product safety notice in relation to the Samsung Note 7, prompting the recall of all the devices in circulation.

 

"Anyone who is still in possession of a Samsung Note 7, please return it to your service provider as soon as possible" says Thorn.

 





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  Reply # 1663775 4-Nov-2016 14:01
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freitasm:

 

Just received:

 

 

For safety reasons the New Zealand Telecommunications industry, in co-ordination with Samsung, is blacklisting any Samsung Note 7 mobile phones still held by customers, from 18 November.

 

This means that Samsung Note 7’s will not be able to be used across any of New Zealand’s mobile networks, after 18 November.

 

New Zealand Telecommunications Forum (TCF) CEO Geoff Thorn says this is a further safety measure by the carriers to ensure everything is being done to assist with the recall process.

 

"Numerous attempts by all providers have been made to contact owners and ask them to bring the phones in for replacement or refund, this action should further aid the return of the remaining handsets."

 

The TCF provides a free public service which allows consumers to easily check whether a mobile phone has been blacklisted.  Each mobile phone has a unique identifying number called an IMEI number and if this number is blacklisted the phone will not operate on any mobile network in New Zealand.

 

Samsung has issued a world-wide product safety notice in relation to the Samsung Note 7, prompting the recall of all the devices in circulation.

 

"Anyone who is still in possession of a Samsung Note 7, please return it to your service provider as soon as possible" says Thorn.

 

 

 

This is great news. I was wondering if they'd be able to do something like this for those who refuse to return these shoddy phones.


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  Reply # 1663783 4-Nov-2016 14:11
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I think there are heaps of people out there who are still holding on to these phones.

 

If not for their own safety then atleast for the safety of others, I suppose this is a good move by the Telcos to enforce the recall on the remaining handsets


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  Reply # 1663842 4-Nov-2016 15:41
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I have seen a few on facebook buy/sell groups still trying to sell them.


Hmm, what to write...
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  Reply # 1663847 4-Nov-2016 15:46
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ibuksh:

 

I think there are heaps of people out there who are still holding on to these phones.

 

If not for their own safety then atleast for the safety of others, I suppose this is a good move by the Telcos to enforce the recall on the remaining handsets

 

 

Is it? does one of these phones cause a danger to their network in any way?

 

What I'm getting at is: Why should they cut off a network device if it is not causing harm to their network? If the  Energy Saftey Service issues a prohibition notice and asks the telcoes to help them enforce it then maybe... but I don't think the Telco's should be able to unilaterally make a decision like this.

 

 

 

 





Matthew


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  Reply # 1663853 4-Nov-2016 16:05
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mdooher:

 

ibuksh:

 

I think there are heaps of people out there who are still holding on to these phones.

 

If not for their own safety then atleast for the safety of others, I suppose this is a good move by the Telcos to enforce the recall on the remaining handsets

 

 

Is it? does one of these phones cause a danger to their network in any way?

 

What I'm getting at is: Why should they cut off a network device if it is not causing harm to their network? If the  Energy Saftey Service issues a prohibition notice and asks the telcoes to help them enforce it then maybe... but I don't think the Telco's should be able to unilaterally make a decision like this.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Their network, they can do whatever they want.  If they want to ban a handset then they are free to do it.  The customer is not out of pocket as there is a full refund + extras.

 

There has been a recall on the device.  People know about the recall yet still there are people out there using them.  What would happen if someone has 1 charging while they are driving, it starts to smoke, the person freaks out and hits someone on a bike.

 

People also seem to forget that if the device does blow up and burns down your house you won't get an insurance payout as its a recalled device.


Hmm, what to write...
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  Reply # 1663883 4-Nov-2016 16:16
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tripp:

 

mdooher:

 

ibuksh:

 

I think there are heaps of people out there who are still holding on to these phones.

 

If not for their own safety then atleast for the safety of others, I suppose this is a good move by the Telcos to enforce the recall on the remaining handsets

 

 

Is it? does one of these phones cause a danger to their network in any way?

 

What I'm getting at is: Why should they cut off a network device if it is not causing harm to their network? If the  Energy Saftey Service issues a prohibition notice and asks the telcoes to help them enforce it then maybe... but I don't think the Telco's should be able to unilaterally make a decision like this.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Their network, they can do whatever they want.  If they want to ban a handset then they are free to do it.  The customer is not out of pocket as there is a full refund + extras.

 

There has been a recall on the device.  People know about the recall yet still there are people out there using them.  What would happen if someone has 1 charging while they are driving, it starts to smoke, the person freaks out and hits someone on a bike.

 

People also seem to forget that if the device does blow up and burns down your house you won't get an insurance payout as its a recalled device.

 

 

Sure, I get that. I also think they should return the device.

 

What I am getting at is these networks are interfering in other (maybe stupid) peoples lives. This is the roll of our Government, not some self appointed publicity seeking Telco. If they are not doing this to protect their network I don't think they should be doing it at all.

 

 

 

What if say Nokia decides to invest in cluster munitions or something else that  may harm people and so they decide to blacklist all Nokia phones... is that OK? (I know its a bit over the top but you get the idea)





Matthew


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  Reply # 1663902 4-Nov-2016 16:45
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mdooher:

 

ibuksh:

 

I think there are heaps of people out there who are still holding on to these phones.

 

If not for their own safety then atleast for the safety of others, I suppose this is a good move by the Telcos to enforce the recall on the remaining handsets

 

 

Is it? does one of these phones cause a danger to their network in any way?

 

What I'm getting at is: Why should they cut off a network device if it is not causing harm to their network? If the  Energy Saftey Service issues a prohibition notice and asks the telcoes to help them enforce it then maybe... but I don't think the Telco's should be able to unilaterally make a decision like this.

 

I suspect that Samsung have asked the Networks to do this, as a means of getting the phones back to them..

 

They may have simply asked, and the networks have agreed,

 

Or they may have forced the networks hands by removing/revoking the certifications the devices have, making it easy for the network to bar them


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  Reply # 1663944 4-Nov-2016 19:11
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freitasm:

Just received:



For safety reasons the New Zealand Telecommunications industry, in co-ordination with Samsung, is blacklisting any Samsung Note 7 mobile phones still held by customers, from 18 November.


This means that Samsung Note 7’s will not be able to be used across any of New Zealand’s mobile networks, after 18 November.


New Zealand Telecommunications Forum (TCF) CEO Geoff Thorn says this is a further safety measure by the carriers to ensure everything is being done to assist with the recall process.


"Numerous attempts by all providers have been made to contact owners and ask them to bring the phones in for replacement or refund, this action should further aid the return of the remaining handsets."


The TCF provides a free public service which allows consumers to easily check whether a mobile phone has been blacklisted.  Each mobile phone has a unique identifying number called an IMEI number and if this number is blacklisted the phone will not operate on any mobile network in New Zealand.


Samsung has issued a world-wide product safety notice in relation to the Samsung Note 7, prompting the recall of all the devices in circulation.


"Anyone who is still in possession of a Samsung Note 7, please return it to your service provider as soon as possible" says Thorn.




Do they know what phone you use when you connect to the provider? If yes that's easy of not then parallel imported phones would still work

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  Reply # 1663955 4-Nov-2016 19:41

joker97:

 

Do they know what phone you use when you connect to the provider? If yes that's easy of not then parallel imported phones would still work

 

Yes, they do. Every phone has a unique IMEI, and part of that is an identifying number called a TAC code which identifies the manufacturer and model. They'll be able to identify all the Note7s on the network, paralleled or otherwise.





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https://pbtech.co.nz/smartphones


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  Reply # 1663960 4-Nov-2016 19:56
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wellygary:

 

mdooher:

 

ibuksh:

 

I think there are heaps of people out there who are still holding on to these phones.

 

If not for their own safety then atleast for the safety of others, I suppose this is a good move by the Telcos to enforce the recall on the remaining handsets

 

 

Is it? does one of these phones cause a danger to their network in any way?

 

What I'm getting at is: Why should they cut off a network device if it is not causing harm to their network? If the  Energy Saftey Service issues a prohibition notice and asks the telcoes to help them enforce it then maybe... but I don't think the Telco's should be able to unilaterally make a decision like this.

 

I suspect that Samsung have asked the Networks to do this, as a means of getting the phones back to them..

 

They may have simply asked, and the networks have agreed,

 

Or they may have forced the networks hands by removing/revoking the certifications the devices have, making it easy for the network to bar them

 

 

..or the networks realized that under NZ health & safety laws they have a legal obligation to ensure any activity they carry out or facilitate is safe, and any safety risks are removed or mitigated.  

 

  





Always be yourself, unless you can be Batman, then always be the Batman





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  Reply # 1664179 5-Nov-2016 12:04
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  Reply # 1664354 5-Nov-2016 18:17
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It's possible to change an imei number? No?

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  Reply # 1664639 6-Nov-2016 18:26
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Shouldn't this thread be closed?





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