Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.


pm



78 posts

Master Geek


Topic # 12196 4-Mar-2007 18:05
Send private message

I've noticed that the elements of a standard UHF antenna are 'conductively-isolated' from the actual antenna.
Ie. each element connects to the antenna with a plastic clip-on.

How do these antenna's work in terms of 'catching' a signal?
What is the role of the elements if they don't connect to one-another like the standard Yagi Uda array?
Also do UHF channels use COFDM?

Create new topic
19660 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 3489

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 62803 5-Mar-2007 00:41
Send private message

log periodic is another similar to yagi antenna that I think UHF's are - they have a huge band to cover so a simple folded dipole doesn't work.




Richard rich.ms

6019 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 153

Trusted

  Reply # 62804 5-Mar-2007 07:01
Send private message

Your typcial UHF TV antenna is infact a Yagi not a Log Periodic. A Log Periodic has all the elements connected, a Yagi does not.

The front elements of the Yagi are directors, they are electrically shorter than the wanted signal and they do not need to be connected conductively to the boom. As these directors are not terminated, ie nothing absorbs the energy they catch, they reradiate it. As they are effectively seen as capacitive (because they are shorter) and due to their relative location to the main dipole of the antenna their re radiated signal is recieved by the active dipole and add to the directly recieved signal at the dipole. The same applies to the reflector behind the main dipole, however being inductive (longer than the dipole/wanted signal) the phase of the reradiated signal also adds to the all the other signals seen at the dipole. Your typical UHF TV Yagi normally has a mesh corner reflector style reflector, this significantly improves rejection of signals from behind.

All DTT Terrestial transmissions in NZ will be in the UHF band. The DVB-T standard they use, uses COFDM as the modulation method. There is no intention to use BandI (45-69MHz) or BandIII(174-230MHz) as these are more prone to impulse noise, a major problem with COFDM. Australia uses BIII and BIV/V (UHF), however not BandI. However due to the terrain in Aus they needed to use the larger coverage VHF band to get effective coverage. I think the decision in NZ to use Satellite to perform overal coverage and UHF to cover the metro areas makes good sense.

Cyril

Create new topic



Twitter »

Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:





News »

Behind Spark’s slow-burn 4.5G plan
Posted 26-Jun-2017 16:23


Red Hat unveils production-ready open source hyperconverged infrastructure
Posted 23-Jun-2017 22:10


Whatever ailed Vodafone broadband … seems to be fixed
Posted 23-Jun-2017 14:10


VMware NSX Meets Stringent Government Security Standards with Common Criteria Certification
Posted 22-Jun-2017 19:05


Brother launches next-generation colour laser printers and all-in- ones for business
Posted 22-Jun-2017 18:56


Intel and IOC announce partnership
Posted 22-Jun-2017 18:50


Samsung Galaxy Tab S3: Best Android tablet
Posted 21-Jun-2017 12:05


Wellington-based company helping secure Microsoft browsers
Posted 20-Jun-2017 20:51


Endace delivers high performance with new 1/10/40 Gbps packet capture card
Posted 20-Jun-2017 20:50


You can now integrate SMX security into Microsoft Office 365, Google and other cloud email platforms
Posted 20-Jun-2017 20:47


Ravensdown launches new decision-making tool HawkEye
Posted 19-Jun-2017 15:38


Spark planning to take on direct management of all consumer stores
Posted 19-Jun-2017 10:03


Qrious acquires Ubiquity
Posted 14-Jun-2017 12:21


Spark New Zealand prepares for 5G with Nokia
Posted 14-Jun-2017 12:16


The future-proof 10.5-inch iPad Pro
Posted 13-Jun-2017 18:16



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.