Why a 24hr parking limit won’t fix the Wellington airport parking issue.

By Steve Biddle, in , posted: 9-Jun-2017 12:22

Unless you’ve been living under a rock you’ll be well aware of the issues surrounding car parking at Wellington airport and the surrounding Miramar streets. Streets nearby to the airport have become a popular alternative for both travellers and staff working at the airport to avoid what many consider to be be excessive parking charges at the airport.

The issue reached breaking point earlier in the year when a local resident was charged and jailed for slashing the tyres of cars parked in streets near his home. This spurred the Wellington City Council into reviewing the situation.

Last week the Council (who are a part owner of the airport) announced that nearby streets within an approximate 700m range of the airport will have a 24hr parking limit. Local residents will receive a single parking permit per property allowing them to park a single vehicle in this area.

This was exclaimed as a “solution to the problem” by media and Council however this can’t be further from the truth – anybody who thinks such a limit will be a magic fix for the problem really are living in a dream world. Rather than actually looking at the issue and why it occurs they’ve implemented a “solution” that’s nothing but a knee jerk reaction.

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From an economics point of view parking at the airport is a finite resource and with significant numbers of parks currently unavailable due to construction of both a new multi story parking building and hotel, many would argue that pricing needs to be set accordingly to ensure demand is matched with supply. With this in mind it’s clear the airport’s parking pricing model is fundamentally flawed – offering long term parking for $125 for up to 9 days and then $5 per day for additional days simply ties up parking space at the airport, meanwhile those who want to park at the airport for a weekend trip away can easily find themselves paying roughly between $64 and $90 for parking. With such high pricing for short term stays it’s hardly surprising people are looking for cheaper alternatives for a day trip or weekend away.

As a frequent flyer I used to be a regular customer of Air New Zealand’s airport parking. This parking space was shared with Air New Zealand staff and consisted of both outdoor and under cover parking using the former Air New Zealand hanger. I was happy to pay $18 per day to park 5 minutes walk away from the terminal and had the option of using the provided shuttle if I so desired. As a result of the demolition of the hanger in early 2017 this land is no longer available to Air New Zealand and their public parking has been discontinued. Air New Zealand Airpoints Elite customers are also disadvantaged with no ability to use their parking vouchers that are allocated each year as a customer benefit.

It’s not the first time that Air New Zealand have been involved in a dispute with the airport company over parking – their valet parking was discontinued several years ago after the airport company announced a significant price increase for the use of car parks near the terminal.

The alternative is now $32.30 per day to park in the airport’s own parking near the terminal. This significant jump in parking prices has turned me into a “street parker” and it’s something I don’t feel guilty about. An 80% increase in the cost to me is a fairly significant price hike.

Many would argue the solution is to encourage alternative forms of transport to the airport including public transport. Public transport during the day is great, but is not an option for those arriving for early morning international or domestic departures, and is also not available for late night international arrivals.

While a taxi or shuttle is an option (complete with an airport surcharge) the airport company refuses to let ride sharing service Uber operate from airport land and continually threatens to trespass drivers despite some legal advice which says they’re unable to do so. The airport company are so unhappy with Uber that they’ve even gone as far as blocking access to the Uber website using their free WiFi meaning it’s not possible to make a booking using this. This means that the hundreds of users per day of the Uber service are typically picked up from the nearby Burger King & Z petrol station which is a 5 minute walk away. Such draconian measures from the airport company towards Uber does nothing to encourage the use of alternative means of transport.

With a 24 hour parking limit set to soon be in place in nearby streets the big question will be what impact this has on those streets. Local residents will only be permitted to park a single vehicle outside their house in the zone – and one assumes if you have more than one vehicle that you will simply find somebody else’s street nearby outside the zone to park it in. Those staff at the airport who aren’t eligible for free staff parking will presumably continue to park in the streets as they’re under the 24 hour limit. Travellers parking for under 24 hours will presumably continue to park in nearby streets as they won’t be affected by the new restrictions. Those who are parking in the street for more than 24 hours will presumably just park outside the 700m zone, because after all an extra 5 minute walk is highly unlikely to change their mindset.

Vehicles breaking the new rules will be liable for a $57 fine or face being towed away. As parking for 28 hours at the airport will cost more than $57 such a fine seems pointless – every car caught breaking the rules would need to be towed for it to be affective as simply paying the fine will be cheaper than airport parking.

Rather than fixing the problem this change is simply going to move the problem further into the suburbs and potentially even increase the problems on the Kilbirnie side on the airport which is easily accessible via the underground subway under the runway.

So what am I going to do? For my regular day trips away I’ll likely still be parking in the street. For weekend trips I’ll just park beyond the 700m zone and walk. I was happy to pay $36 for parking at Air New Zealand for a 30 hr weekend away in Auckland – I’m not happy to pay the $64 the airport want for their parking. For that extra $28 I could even park in a nearby street and catch a taxi or Uber and still save money. Watching what happens over the next six months will be interesting to observe.



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The perils of using Airbnb during big events
How to remotely control your heat pump from your phone for under NZ$25






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Steve Biddle
Wellington
New Zealand


I'm an engineer who loves building solutions to solve problems.


I also love sharing my views and analysis of the tech world on this blog, along with the odd story about aviation and the travel industry.

My interests and skillset include:

*VoIP (Voice over IP). I work with various brands of hardware and PBX's on a daily basis
  -Asterisk (incl PiaF, FreePBX, Elastix)
  -Polycom
  -Cisco
  -Linksys
  -Patton
  -Zyxel
  -Snom
  -Sangoma
  -Audiocodes

*Telecommunications/Broadband
  -xDSL deployments
  -WiMAX
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*Structured cabling
  -Home/office cabling
  -Phone & Data

*Computer networking
  -Mikrotik hardware
  -WAN/LAN solutions

*Wireless solutions
  -Motel/Hotel hotspot deployments
  -Outdoor wireless deployments, both small and large scale
  -Temporary wireless deployments
   
*CCTV solutions
  -Analogue and IP

I'm an #avgeek who loves to travel the world (preferably in seat 1A) and stay in nice hotels.


+My views do no represent my employer. I'm sure they'll be happy to give their own if you ask them.


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