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Topic # 114257 13-Feb-2013 18:21 Send private message

hi guys,

I have 38 network cables coming into my garage and I'm not sure how I should install them.

Option 1
Cut a hole in the gib and have all cables just coming through and into a Dynamix network cabinet (600x450x901) and inside that cabinet install two 24 port cat6 patch panels.
This has the benefit of having the patch panels in the cabinet, but then I have a ugly hole in my wall (not a big deal as cabinet will be in front of it) and if I sell the house the new owners wouldnt really want 38 cables just hanging out of the wall (as I would take the cabinet and patch panel).  This isnt a problem now, Im building the house new, so Ill be there for 10+ years probably

Option 2
Screw the patch panels into the gib (probably with some pine wood framing timber glued to the back of the gib with sellys no more nails for added supported).  This has the advantage of, cleaner look, but requires longer cables to the switch that will be inside the cabinet.  In this case I would leave the patch panels in the wall when I sell the house.   I have some pine wood framing timber left over from another project.

I'm leaning towards option 2, but not sure if its ok to install patch panels this way?  Some what afraid of dust getting in there, but could cut put some framing timber above the patch panels as a lip type thing to keep some dust away.

thoughts/comments/recommendations ?

TIA

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  Reply # 761875 13-Feb-2013 18:29 Send private message

Option 1:
You could always put a wooden panel over the top to your 38 cables if you decide to sell and take the gear with you.

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  Reply # 761878 13-Feb-2013 18:37 Send private message

For the price of a couple of patch panels, I would have though it was hardly worth taking them with you in 10 years time. Left connected to a structured cabling system, they should increase the house value.

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  Reply # 761879 13-Feb-2013 18:40 Send private message

Option 1. You will hate yourself for doing option 2 when it comes to switches, router, NAS etc.

And leave the cabinet there when you leave. It boggles my mind when people decide to rip off the patch panel when they vacate. It is part of the building and adds value. Go for a nice 12U cabinet and there will be plenty of room for all your gear. Perhaps even a home audio system amplifier.



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  Reply # 761908 13-Feb-2013 19:20 Send private message

this is the cabinet I have

It won't be attached to the wall, think its too big, will be sitting on a shelf half way up the wall. so since its not attached to the house, I will be using the switches inside it, it will be housing my NAS and server. I wouldnt leave this behind. And if the patch panels are inside that cabinet, then its illogical to leave the patch panels behind (as they wont be inside anything).




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  Reply # 761909 13-Feb-2013 19:25 Send private message

That cabinet is built to be screwed on the wall. I have put one double that size on a wall with no issues at all.

Of course you would take the NAS and server but the cabinet would stay. It is part of the home cabling system.



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  Reply # 761914 13-Feb-2013 19:34 Send private message

sure, if you have studs in the right place you can screw it in the wall, but it fits inbetween the studs, so thats not an option.

I was originally going to screw it into the wall.

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  Reply # 761918 13-Feb-2013 19:44 Send private message

What is the stud spacing? They're normally at 600 centres, which is the width of the cabinet, so you should be able to overlap a stud at each side by 25mm or so, and probably pick up a nog as well. Alternatively, put a couple of well mounted battens between two adjacent studs, and attach the cabinet to that.

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  Reply # 761926 13-Feb-2013 20:20 Send private message

As above, hinged side goes on a stud and top of cabinet is at perfect height when put at the first nog (800mm down on a standard 2400mm wall). Loose bottom corner gets a 'gib fix' screw and you are good to go. The gib fix screw are those big corkscrew type thing that goes in the gib then the actual screw goes inside the corkscrew thing.



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  Reply # 761936 13-Feb-2013 20:31 Send private message

i took the cabinet to the house before the gib went up and sadly it was just inside it

mockup


these no noggins at that height behind it, only one lower down the wall. So my plan was to make a shelf in that corner and just put it on that shelf. don't mind mounting it directly to the wall, but just didnt see how that was really possible. just trying to achieve the best result here.


completely forget about the selling the house and leaving it part of the discussion, its 10 years away at the earliest. doesnt really matter.

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  Reply # 761945 13-Feb-2013 20:49 Send private message

Bit of a DIY solution i suppose, but couldn't you just put a couple of bits of wood between the studs and mount it to that instead? Could even just make it one big flat bit of wood painted the same colour as the wall, and it wouldn't matter.

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  Reply # 761953 13-Feb-2013 21:06 Send private message

Ok cool. So the wall still has no lining? Ideal time to get some fixing in there. Couple of 4x2s on their side in and you have ample fixing for the cabinet.

I think you will just be cursing yourself trying to mount the patch panels in the wall. Its the old round hole square post thing, just isn't meant to be like that.



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  Reply # 761974 13-Feb-2013 21:55 Send private message

nah all the gib is up now, so cant put in any noggins.

ill just make a shelf, put the cabinet on the shelf, run the cables from a hole in the wall into the cabinet with the patch panels. that was my original plan, just thought the patch panels directly into the gib would of been a cleaner solution

thanks for the input guys.

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  Reply # 767566 22-Feb-2013 12:24 Send private message

chevrolux: As above, hinged side goes on a stud and top of cabinet is at perfect height when put at the first nog (800mm down on a standard 2400mm wall). Loose bottom corner gets a 'gib fix' screw and you are good to go. The gib fix screw are those big corkscrew type thing that goes in the gib then the actual screw goes inside the corkscrew thing.

Since the studs and everything are all different, just put a ply backing board on the wall screwed into the studs, as big as you need it with edges shaved off and nicely painted. then you can mount he cabinet anywhwere you like on the backing board.

Alternatively you could use the big cabinet for your server, NAS, sound system etc and put a shallow communications cabinet up to hold the cabling, phone equipment, tv splitter, switch and modem etc. Again on a backing board. You would need 4 extra cables (or so) connecting the big cabinet to the comms cabinet, so that would use a few spare ports on the second patch panel. Advantage of this way is that a Signet wall cabinet for example fits the signet phone and TV modules -- and you can take your big server cabinet with you when you move. You might find a way to mount the patch panel vertically if you got the bigger size Signet cabinet.

But the comms cabinet really is part of the house, its permanent so try to make sure its permanently fixed to the timber with some nice big coach screws. Shame they didn't put a flush-mounted comms cabinet in when they built the place, would have thought architects should do that as standard these days.




Qualified in business, certified in fibre, stuck in copper, have to keep going  ^_^



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  Reply # 771688 28-Feb-2013 13:22 Send private message

webwat: Since the studs and everything are all different, just put a ply backing board on the wall screwed into the studs, as big as you need it with edges shaved off and nicely painted. then you can mount he cabinet anywhwere you like on the backing board.


thats a really good idea :)

any pointers how to do this?

- Thickness of backing board that would be strong enough for a heavy cabinet with stuff inside, maybe 50kg in weight once everything is in there.
- Should I attach the backing board to the cabinet first then screw that to the wall, or should I put up the backing board onto the wall the just screw the cabinet into the backing board?
- Should I use screws or should I use something like bolts to attach the cabinet to the backing board?

Sorry I'm a real n00b at house DIY (never had a house to do diy), but not a complete n00b at making stuff, so I'm sure I can do this, just want to make sure I do it right and the cabinet doesnt fall off the wall a year or so down the track :)

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  Reply # 771707 28-Feb-2013 14:04 Send private message

Something like 13mm plywood should be sufficient (people walk on this when it is used as a roofing substrate with 600mm centres, maybe up to 800, and the building requirements are it must hold 70kg per meter squared)

First make a hole in the ply for your cables, then you want to attach the plywood to the wall. With screws. Pre-drill holes for the screws.

Id say at least four screws per side. Make sure the screws are long enough to go through your plywood, through the gib board and at least 50mm into the studs.

Maybe paint the ply before attaching the cabinet.

Lastly attach the cabinet to the plywood.

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