Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.
Newsweek on mobile phone technology and Wi-Fi
Posted on 31-May-2004 07:41 | Tags Filed under: News


Newsweek on mobile phone technology and Wi-Fi
As phones get smarter, smaller and faster and enable users to connect at high speeds to the Internet, is the mobile phone handset turning into the next computer? Newsweek Silicon Valley Correspondent Brad Stone examines the possibility in the 7 June cover, "Next Frontiers: Way Cool Phones". Stone looks at the sophistication of mobile phones, how pervasive wireless communications have become around the world and talks to experts about the possibilities of telephones replacing the computer. "One day, 2 or 3 billion people will have cell phones, and they are all not going to have PCs," says Jeff Hawkins, inventor of the Palm Pilot and the chief technology officer of PalmOne. "The mobile phone will become their digital life."

By the end of this year, half of all laptops shipped will be Wi-Fi equipped, allowing laptop owners to set up temporary offices in the local cafe or public park. "Hundreds of millions of people are not going to replace the full screen, mouse and keyboard experience with staring at a little screen," says Sean Maloney, an executive VP at chipmaker Intel, which is investing heavily both in Wi-Fi and mobile-phone technology." Yet mobile-phone innovators are working to solve that tricky problem, too.

Newsweek's "Next Frontiers" is an ongoing series looking at how technology is changing the way we live and work. Also in the cover package: Technology Editor Steven Levy writes in a column that the same phone technology that keeps us connected to work and family may lead us to a future where cell phones track us, sometimes voluntarily and sometimes when we're not aware. "My guess is that the widespread adoption of tracking won't be done against our will but initially with our consent. As with other double-edged tools, the benefits will be immediately apparent, while the privacy drawbacks emerge gradually," Levy writes.

Newsweek names 10 cities that are using wireless technology in innovative ways:

  • Hermiston, Ore.: The home of EZ Wireless, which built the US largest regional wireless broadband network, a 600-square-mile Wi-Fi blanket, and activated it this February.

  • San Diego, Calif.: A community group called SoCalFreeNet has installed a dozen public nodes in the city and suburbs to give everyone free wireless Web access.

  • Auckland, New Zealand: Six months ago, Auckland became one of a few communities to deploy a single high-speed wireless network that blankets the entire city. Users can surf the Net at high speeds from the beach, their office, their homes or even a moving bus (in this case Newsweek cites Woosh).

  • Las Vegas, Nev.: Not only are hotels offering Wi-Fi access in their rooms, but one RV Park owner offers his residents a hook-up for a $36 monthly fee, which brings customers to his property.

  • London, England: Soho is about to become the first wireless law-enforcement district in London. Fifty wireless cameras and sensors will be installed around the neighborhood that will take videos good enough to be admissible in court.

  • New York, N.Y.: Wi-Fi network access covers the city, from Columbia University and Bryant Park to the East Village where one group stitched together a network that operates from rooftops.

  • The Bay Area (San Francisco, San Jose, Oakland), Calif.: Chosen as the most unwired "city" in America in Intel's annual survey, even the Giants' ballpark is a hotspot.

  • Washington, D.C.: Last month, Silicon Valley wireless firm Tropos brought free wireless Internet access to the eastern corner of the National Mall. Next: unwiring the entire two-mile-long Mall, Capitol Hill and all.

  • Tokyo, Japan: Just about every person over the age of 12 in Tokyo owns a mobile phone, of which a fifth are high-speed 3G phones that are Internet-enabled.

  • Austin, Tex.: Since last year, volunteers of the Austin Wireless City Project have been coordinating the city's free networks and helping residents and visitors get online with a single user name and password anywhere on the network.



  • comments powered by Disqus




    Trending now »

    Hot discussions in our forums right now:

    The President Of The USA: Donald Trump
    Created by TimA, last reply by Fred99 on 24-Feb-2017 10:21 (3283 replies)
    Pages... 217 218 219


    Mikrotik RB 3011 multiple port flapping (Title updated)
    Created by RobBB, last reply by RunningMan on 22-Feb-2017 21:54 (57 replies)
    Pages... 2 3 4


    Vodafone / SKY merger
    Created by wingbat45, last reply by richms on 24-Feb-2017 08:56 (134 replies)
    Pages... 7 8 9


    "Parents' lawsuit claims FaceTime caused daughter's death"
    Created by kingdragonfly, last reply by richms on 23-Feb-2017 11:03 (23 replies)
    Pages... 2


    Android (FB) Messenger App Bugs/Issues
    Created by TimA, last reply by tripp on 21-Feb-2017 19:45 (20 replies)
    Pages... 2


    SureSignal missed calls
    Created by hairy1, last reply by froob on 23-Feb-2017 20:23 (19 replies)
    Pages... 2


    geekzone ads are out of control
    Created by 1101, last reply by DarthKermit on 23-Feb-2017 02:11 (57 replies)
    Pages... 2 3 4


    Best way to network my computers
    Created by Rikkitic, last reply by 1101 on 24-Feb-2017 09:28 (73 replies)
    Pages... 3 4 5