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Company launches New Zealand-based phone recycling

Posted on 4-Jun-2010 09:46 | Filed under: News


Mobile phone users will be paid for their old and unwanted handsets as part of an innovative New Zealand-first mobile phone recycling and recovery scheme.

Money4Mobiles.co.nz aims to fully recycle as many mobile phones as possible within New Zealand, and give corporations and individuals the chance to put extra money in their pockets and help the environment too.

The phones recycled within New Zealand will be on-sold to emerging and developing nations including India, Russia, South America and China.

“There are around 1.8 million unused mobile phones gathering dust in cupboards and drawers within New Zealand alone,” says Money4Mobiles.co.nz director John Wilson.

“Money4Mobiles.co.nz encourages both individuals and businesses to send in their old mobiles for recycling and eventual sale to emerging and developing countries experiencing high demand for mobile phones.

“Kiwis will be able to help stop inappropriate and dangerous waste ending up in landfills and provide developing countries with affordable access to mobile phones, and at the same time make cash,” says Wilson.

The website Money4Mobiles.co.nz offers a step-by-step guide to recycling mobiles for cash.

Mobile phone users will be asked to input their mobile make and model before grading their phone from ‘A’ (as new condition) down to a ‘D’ (poor condition, i.e. major scratching and missing battery or back cover).

Users will be given a price based on their input. Prices start from $1 for old phones and go up to $512 and payment will be made within five working days.

“When Money4Mobiles.co.nz receives an order and it meets our terms and conditions, customers receive a payment direct to their bank account,” says Wilson.

Phones beyond repair will be used for parts and the company aims to recycle 75 per cent of all phones received.

Any surplus product not returned to a working category is stripped for parts to assist the correction of future faulty products.

“Handsets contain a number of hazardous components such as plastics, cadmium, lead and mercury in the batteries which are potential environmental threats if they are just thrown away rather than recycled,” says Wilson.

Users will be asked to remove old SIM or memory cards, as well as any existing data stored on the handset, before sending their phones for recycling.


More information: http://Money4Mobiles.co.nz...