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Topic # 28365 27-Nov-2008 13:16
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How many users out there have a microchip in their VISA card?

I just got my shiny new VISA Platinum from ASB and it has a microchip in it. The accompanying documentation states most EFTPOS readers in NZ will have a slot for microchip cards and details how to use it (leave card in reader while entering PIN etc)

1) How many shop assistants are going to use the microchip slot instead of the mag strip? I'd say damn near 0

2) How many shop assistants are going to be totally confused when I say "please use the microchip slot instead"? I'd say damn near all

3) How many shop assistants will say "what are you doing" when I try and use the microchip slot myself? See answer to number 2.

Any real world experience?

I guess the banks have to start pushing them out to get the awareness going but I can't see my microchip getting too much action any time soon :-)

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  Reply # 180671 27-Nov-2008 13:44
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We have been getting quite of a few of those in here in the shop, and we have a pretty new eftpos terminal.

When the card is swiped the terminal prompts us to stick the card into the slot, but it seems that not *all* of the chip cards ask for that to happen - I think it's only with C/card transactions and dosn't apply when the card is being used for eftpos, as it often dosn't prompt untill the customer selects an account.

It seems intermittant, some banks more so than others, which isn't going to help the confusion.



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  Reply # 180673 27-Nov-2008 13:46
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The new EFTPOS machine we have in the shop has the slot as well as the swip.
If I swipe a card with a microchip the EFTPOS machine tells me to insert it into the slot before it will continue.




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  Reply # 180689 27-Nov-2008 14:50
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Ah, I had to do this to a customers card the other day! First one I have ever used, took me a couple of minutes to work out! But now I'm up to scratch on what to do, will be a breeze next time!

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  Reply # 180712 27-Nov-2008 17:17
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scottjpalmer: How many users out there have a microchip in their VISA card?



I just got my shiny new VISA Platinum from ASB and it has a microchip in it. The accompanying documentation states most EFTPOS readers in NZ will have a slot for microchip cards and details how to use it (leave card in reader while entering PIN etc)


Had mine a couple of weeks.  Guess you could call me an "early adopter".  Most terminals work.  Those that dont prompt you to swipe the card anyway.  E.g. Foodtown still need to swipe my card.

scottjpalmer:
1) How many shop assistants are going to use the microchip slot instead of the mag strip? I'd say damn near 0

Actually I've found most have used them.  As has been mentioned earlier when you swipe it and it wants you to use the chip it prompts you to insert the card.  Most assistants can follow the instructions ;-)

scottjpalmer:
2) How many shop assistants are going to be totally confused when I say "please use the microchip slot instead"? I'd say damn near all

Let them learn the way I described above.

scottjpalmer:
3) How many shop assistants will say "what are you doing" when I try and use the microchip slot myself? See answer to number 2.

I've had a few.  But by now most have seen one of these cards.

scottjpalmer:
Any real world experience?


There's one type of terminal that I've had fun and games with till I realised it was a "PEBKAC" type error.  You slide the card into the bottom of the handheld pin pad.  I thought you'd slide the card in with the chip facing up.  But you actually have to slide it in "upside down".  There's a little picture on the bottom of the pad next to demonstrate this but wasn't immediately obvious to me.

After a few attempts of inserting the card, being told to swipe, swiping the card, being told to insert it, being told to swipe for it eventually to decide it'd take the swipe I spotted the graphic.  Girl in the shop hadn't noticed that either so the next time I tried (after spotting the graphic and having a eureka moment) she tried to stop me but then said "oh...it works now".

That's about the only issue I've had.  More a design flaw of the pin pad than anything else (if like me you expect to insert the card face up).

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  Reply # 180720 27-Nov-2008 17:52
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We sell Retail software & it usually integrates with eftpos solutions.
Had about 2 phone calls asking me what the eftpos machine meant when it stated to insert card.  Most new eftpos pin pads issued within the last 2 years have had a mico chip slot.
Although we never actually tested the micro chip feature ourselves, it apparently just works.

I guess everyone else just figured it out on their own.  Must be that intuitive =)




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  Reply # 180739 27-Nov-2008 18:46
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Have to say that I've had mixed results over here when using a UK based chip and pin card. The UK went fully pin number over 2 years ago, I was very surprised that you Kiwis were not ahead in the game! Though when you have a criedit card with a pin number and you can still sign for the transaction seems a little silly to me (and having to request a pin number for a NZ based credit card seems just as silly). Hopefully it will roll out as soon as possible but I guess it happens when retailers upgrade thier EFTPOS machines...

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  Reply # 180744 27-Nov-2008 18:59
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Shop assistants are not idiots. If you recieved a letter from the bank stating that these are the instructions on how to use it so did we. If I try to swipe a customer's card in the mag strip, it says "please use the micro chip slot". There is only 1 other slot left to try.




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  Reply # 180748 27-Nov-2008 19:29
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knoydart: Have to say that I've had mixed results over here when using a UK based chip and pin card. The UK went fully pin number over 2 years ago, I was very surprised that you Kiwis were not ahead in the game! Though when you have a criedit card with a pin number and you can still sign for the transaction seems a little silly to me (and having to request a pin number for a NZ based credit card seems just as silly). Hopefully it will roll out as soon as possible but I guess it happens when retailers upgrade thier EFTPOS machines...


My understanding was that once the 3DES/EMV upgrade was in place (December 2007) that all terminals had to be complaiant from this date with ETSL promising to disconnect non compliant terminals.

Theoretically every terminal out there should now be chip compatible.

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  Reply # 180774 27-Nov-2008 21:22
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First off... VISA Platinum!!! What! Why such a great privilege!!! *drools*

Secondly, in Asia, you won't find any retail not knowing how to use microchip credit cards. Earlier this year when I was back in Malaysia, at one retail where I wanted to pay by credit card, the cashier has no clue on how to use magnetic stripe credit card... And there I thought banks and retails in NZ are more advanced than everyone in the world (after all, NZ is the first country with EFTPOS system)... I say, the new microchip credit card is to conform the ever evolution of credit card transactions in Asia and most other "modern" countries.




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  Reply # 180777 27-Nov-2008 21:44
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Chip + PIN has also been compulsary in the UK since 2006.

Bank credit card security in this part of the world is very very lax - I even know of people travelling around Europe who have had credit cards declined because they don't have chip cards. Merchants simply won't accept them due to their perceived fraud risk.



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  Reply # 180778 27-Nov-2008 21:46
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Signatures should be scrapped at least, no need for anyone to sign, should all be PIN.

Some great responses so far, thanks all, it appears that there is a lot more knowledge out there about microchip cards than I thought. I'll see how my next few purchases go, been too busy today to go shopping!

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  Reply # 180799 27-Nov-2008 22:38
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You say signatures should be scrapped.....BUT.....what if the PIN system isn't working?  That does happen.  Signatures are there for that reason - just in case.

Does anyone else find the chip/pin combo takes much longer than the swipe/pin combo?  Its got to be at least twice as long for everything to happen.



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  Reply # 180802 27-Nov-2008 22:49
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For the once or twice in the last 8+ years I have had to sign a zip-zap receipt becuase the electronic system wasn't working I would rather have come back later to buy what I wanted rather than leave the option for someone to forge my signature so widely open.

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  Reply # 180805 27-Nov-2008 22:55
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Well a signature-purchased is still quite the thing in Asia, having said that they're moving to use microchip. As mentioned, zip-zap is used for those just in case time like if the telephone line is down.

And at some places, zip-zap is required as proof of identity at hotels. And also for those moment where you're a tourist and the only form of purchase at the time is zip-zap, then you can't just come back at later day. It's still a valid alternative method to authorised purchase, just not the best.

Everything must have a fallback.




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  Reply # 180829 28-Nov-2008 06:46
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One of the biggest changes here will bo in restaurants and cafes. Despit the security risks it's still very common for people to leave their credit card with their bill and for staff to swipe this and bring back their receipt to sign.

With chip cards this can't work any longer. The customer either has to go to the counter and pay or as many as happening with quite a few bars or cafes now they can invest in WiFi or cellular terminals that are portable.

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