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peejayw

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#216719 10-Jul-2017 07:35
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Does anyone have the tech to copy an old slide for me using a camera to output a raw file ? Commercial processors all seem to scan then output as a jpeg and as this slide is quite old it is going to need a lot of work done to it so I would like to have a raw file to work on.

 

Happy to pay a reasonable fee to get this done and I can include a thumbdrive with the slide to transfer the file to.





 I'm supposed to respect my elders, but it's getting harder and harder for me to find one now.


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timmmay
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  #1817562 10-Jul-2017 07:37
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Where are you? TIFF is typically almost as good as RAW, and maximum quality jpeg is really quite good too. Do you want a photo or do you want it to go through a scanner? Based on pretty much no knowledge of slides but a good knowledge of photography I'd imagine a light source behind it would be essential.


peejayw

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  #1817563 10-Jul-2017 07:46
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Auckland. I havent had much to do with Tiff files but I know that raw files give you much more room for correction than a compressed jpeg does. I believe there is a specific attachment that holds the slide and connects onto the camera, was hoping someone would have this settup and the know-how.





 I'm supposed to respect my elders, but it's getting harder and harder for me to find one now.


timmmay
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  #1817567 10-Jul-2017 08:08
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A RAW file does have more latitude from a camera, but a TIFF file is just as good in this situation as you can easily control the exposure of the slide. A maximum quality jpeg is basically uncompressed. If you can't find someone who can produce a TIFF I think a high resolution high quality jpeg will be fine.




sbaird
81 posts

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  #1817605 10-Jul-2017 09:39
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Hey

 

Place I work at digitizes slides, We normally output as a JPEG as that's what the scanner we usually use outputs.
If you send it though I can scan with out flatbed scanner that can do a tiff as well but the quality is generally not as high,
See example below

 

http://www.camerahousenz.com/examples.html

http://www.camerahousenz.com/store/p162/Digitize_Slides.html

 

timmmay is correct about the light being important, Needs to be perfectly defused!


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