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Topic # 201795 4-Sep-2016 10:27
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Morning,
Wondering if anyone is using a chromebook, how's the experience going etc?

Daughter is off to uni next year and was thinking of getting her one.




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  Reply # 1622308 4-Sep-2016 10:38
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I'd recommend a windows laptop or mac with Microsoft office (most unis have free office 365 for students) if she's going to be creating documents for reports and presentations a lot. Tried making many assignments on googles suite of programmes and they ended up horrible, even more so if you were editing a doc made in word to start with.

For research and note taking a chrome book could maybe get the job done, but considering a lot of chrome books are on the same price level or even higher to that of an equivalent spec pc, I say just do pc.


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  Reply # 1622314 4-Sep-2016 10:51
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We have one for daughter in Year 7, and it's a neat little machine. It's an HP, but the better one with 4GB ram and 32GB storage from memory. Great for Google docs and browsing. Doesn't do much game-wise but this is a plus for me!

Cheers,
Joseph

this one, from PB

 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 1622322 4-Sep-2016 11:13
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I have a Toshiba Chromebook 2 and am using it to type this - excellent machines. I find I use it more than any other computer in the house (laptops, iMac etc).

 

Something to bare in mind is the Android app store is coming shortly to select models, you can find out what models here.





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  Reply # 1622375 4-Sep-2016 12:41
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michaelmurfy:

I have a Toshiba Chromebook 2 and am using it to type this - excellent machines. I find I use it more than any other computer in the house (laptops, iMac etc).


Something to bare in mind is the Android app store is coming shortly to select models, you can find out what models here.



Do you have android apps running yet, Michael? Curious to heat how they work. That link lists the Toshie Chromebook 2 as later 2016/17.

Miss 7 is getting her first device for Xmas and currently starting to look around at Android tablets w keyboards vs iPads vs a Windows hybrid. A Chromebook might be something else to add to the mix.



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  Reply # 1622377 4-Sep-2016 12:49
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josephhinvest: We have one for daughter in Year 7, and it's a neat little machine. It's an HP, but the better one with 4GB ram and 32GB storage from memory. Great for Google docs and browsing. Doesn't do much game-wise but this is a plus for me!

Cheers,
Joseph

this one, from PB


I like the price as well




Windows 10 Pro - Ubuntu 18.10 - DJI Mavic Air




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  Reply # 1622378 4-Sep-2016 12:52
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michaelmurfy:

I have a Toshiba Chromebook 2 and am using it to type this - excellent machines. I find I use it more than any other computer in the house (laptops, iMac etc).


Something to bare in mind is the Android app store is coming shortly to select models, you can find out what models here.



Do these machines run better due to not having 'overheads' running in the background ie Windows services? So therefore all resources are directed to where needed ie chrome?




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  Reply # 1622379 4-Sep-2016 12:55
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tardtasticx:

I'd recommend a windows laptop or mac with Microsoft office (most unis have free office 365 for students) if she's going to be creating documents for reports and presentations a lot. Tried making many assignments on googles suite of programmes and they ended up horrible, even more so if you were editing a doc made in word to start with.

For research and note taking a chrome book could maybe get the job done, but considering a lot of chrome books are on the same price level or even higher to that of an equivalent spec pc, I say just do pc.



Her current schooling is already in the Google docs environment plus was after something portable etc




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  Reply # 1622390 4-Sep-2016 13:28
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DamageInc:

Do these machines run better due to not having 'overheads' running in the background ie Windows services? So therefore all resources are directed to where needed ie chrome?

 

Correct. They're really quick machines and have really excellent battery life too (mine is currently sitting at 15% with 1hr 38mins left) but don't expect the same performance as a desktop. Mine for example has an ULV Celeron processor which is not at all grunty but for things like Google Docs, music, video (Netflix, Lightbox) and many other things it is totally fine. Also, the speakers in mine are really good too considering the size and weight.

 

Have a look at the Amazon certified refurb of the model I am using here as it falls in your pricerange plus is one of the Chromebooks with support for Android apps late this year. It has a really beautiful screen and really nice keyboard / trackpad too.

 

mdf:

Do you have android apps running yet, Michael? Curious to heat how they work. That link lists the Toshie Chromebook 2 as later 2016/17.

Miss 7 is getting her first device for Xmas and currently starting to look around at Android tablets w keyboards vs iPads vs a Windows hybrid. A Chromebook might be something else to add to the mix.

 

It isn't quite released to my model yet and I am running the dev builds of the software (quite crashy on my current dev build) but should be released in the next few months I am told.

 

 





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  Reply # 1622441 4-Sep-2016 14:34
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I have an Acer somethingorother with a 13" 1080 screen and 4GB and I absolutely love it. It's lightweight, the battery lasts forever, has a great screen, a good keyboard, and it's perfect for carrying around during the day showcasing work to clients.

 

You can use office suite online with a M$ account if you need to but google apps handles all my basic document and spreadsheet needs.

 

Cost me $250 and I wouldn't swap it for anything else. My wife loves her touchscreen C720p and my older kids use Acer C720's for school.

 

Pick one up either from Amazon to save buckets of money or keep an eye on TM. So many people buy them thinking they are laptops and sell them for ridiculously cheap amounts. I picked up a perfect C720 for $120 a while ago.


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  Reply # 1622475 4-Sep-2016 16:40
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Out of the 150-odd people on my university course, not even one have a Chromebook. And I guess it's for a good reason—the University expects people to submit all their work in one of the Office formats. And this is despite the University providing all students with a Google Apps account and using Gmail for the students' email service.

 

 

For whats its worth I would strongly recommend a Windows PC and/or a MacBook (depending on which course she is doing). I am doing a Postgrad Diploma in Teaching and I would guess at least half my cohort have a MacBook and the other half have PC laptops with similar specifications to the MacBook.

 

 

And adding to the comments here re schools: I have also gone on practicum to some primary schools and a junior college where Chromebooks are all the rage. I agree Chromebooks work extremely well in that environment and if your children were going to Primary, Intermediate and/or Junior College and the school specifies Chromebook then by all means go for Chrombooks. However I can't say the same for a University environment—the pace of change is very slow there compared to many schools.

 

 

Slightly off topic, I was interested to observe that I have yet to see a teacher use a Chromebook. Most of the schools I've been to are still issuing MacBooks to their teaching staff with only a few issuing PC laptops. If Chromebooks are so good why not provide staff with these too...? These obviously have their limitations so keep that in mind.

 

 

- James

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  Reply # 1622500 4-Sep-2016 17:50
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It really depends what your daughter will be studying. Before I started Uni, I thought it would be essential to have a laptop. I'm studying business, and there's almost no point me taking my laptop in each day.

 

Pros:
• flexibility - you can work anywhere on campus, not just on the Uni computers
• cool factor - you look cool with your Macbook Air lol

 

Cons:
• it has little to no use in lectures, because much of the content can't be instantly/easily replicated on a laptop (depends on the course)
• in class there will be laptops provided if they're needed
• it adds even more weight to your bag (already heavy from textbooks)
• there will be computers she can use at Uni outside of class
• it can be a procrastination tool

In saying that, she will still need some form of computer for Uni at home. I considered purchasing a Chromebook as well, but I ended up going with a 2015 Macbook Air. I got lucky and picked up an 3 month old one for $1300 on TradeMe. It was retailing for $2200 at the time. The retail prices are crazy, try find a second hand one in good nick if you go the Macbook Air route.



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  Reply # 1622594 4-Sep-2016 18:44
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Sam91:

It really depends what your daughter will be studying. Before I started Uni, I thought it would be essential to have a laptop. I'm studying business, and there's almost no point me taking my laptop in each day.

 

Pros:
• flexibility - you can work anywhere on campus, not just on the Uni computers
• cool factor - you look cool with your Macbook Air lol

 

Cons:
• it has little to no use in lectures, because much of the content can't be instantly/easily replicated on a laptop (depends on the course)
• in class there will be laptops provided if they're needed
• it adds even more weight to your bag (already heavy from textbooks)
• there will be computers she can use at Uni outside of class
• it can be a procrastination tool

In saying that, she will still need some form of computer for Uni at home. I considered purchasing a Chromebook as well, but I ended up going with a 2015 Macbook Air. I got lucky and picked up an 3 month old one for $1300 on TradeMe. It was retailing for $2200 at the time. The retail prices are crazy, try find a second hand one in good nick if you go the Macbook Air route.


 

 

Some counter-points to the above:-

 

- I have experienced periods of time where the computer labs have been completely full, so laptops are pretty much the only way to guarantee you can complete your assignments etc (especially when there are multiple assignments due at the same time!).

 

- Universities won't (always) provide devices if needed—I've had one test where we were required to bring our own laptop (or tablet if it had to come to that but that was discouraged) to write an in-class essay electronically. Some students asked for the option to write it on paper and was told no, a device must be brought in. These students ended up borrowing laptops etc to complete that test.

 

- Having a laptop allows you to take notes in class. I see many students using OneNote during class. Some even use PowerPoint's notes function. Others just use Notes/Word/etc to take down their notes. I don't use these myself but I've seen them used often enough that it seems like a viable option for people who prefer to take notes during class.

 

 

Try keeping an eye on PB Tech if you want a cheap MacBook. I got mine for $1400 when the new model came out and PB was selling the previous model cheaply, I suppose to get rid of their old stock. That option has the advantage you get warranty from the date of purchase—which worked out well for me when my MacBook's logic board failed several days before the warranty expiry!

 

 

But I'm sure a cheap PC laptop would do fine. That plus the University's free Office 365 subscription would be the best value for your money.

 

 

- James



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  Reply # 1622609 4-Sep-2016 19:03
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KiwiSurfer:
Sam91:

It really depends what your daughter will be studying. Before I started Uni, I thought it would be essential to have a laptop. I'm studying business, and there's almost no point me taking my laptop in each day.


Pros:
• flexibility - you can work anywhere on campus, not just on the Uni computers
• cool factor - you look cool with your Macbook Air lol


Cons:
• it has little to no use in lectures, because much of the content can't be instantly/easily replicated on a laptop (depends on the course)
• in class there will be laptops provided if they're needed
• it adds even more weight to your bag (already heavy from textbooks)
• there will be computers she can use at Uni outside of class
• it can be a procrastination tool

In saying that, she will still need some form of computer for Uni at home. I considered purchasing a Chromebook as well, but I ended up going with a 2015 Macbook Air. I got lucky and picked up an 3 month old one for $1300 on TradeMe. It was retailing for $2200 at the time. The retail prices are crazy, try find a second hand one in good nick if you go the Macbook Air route.




Some counter-points to the above:-
- I have experienced periods of time where the computer labs have been completely full, so laptops are pretty much the only way to guarantee you can complete your assignments etc (especially when there are multiple assignments due at the same time!).
- Universities won't (always) provide devices if needed—I've had one test where we were required to bring our own laptop (or tablet if it had to come to that but that was discouraged) to write an in-class essay electronically. Some students asked for the option to write it on paper and was told no, a device must be brought in. These students ended up borrowing laptops etc to complete that test.
- Having a laptop allows you to take notes in class. I see many students using OneNote during class. Some even use PowerPoint's notes function. Others just use Notes/Word/etc to take down their notes. I don't use these myself but I've seen them used often enough that it seems like a viable option for people who prefer to take notes during class.

Try keeping an eye on PB Tech if you want a cheap MacBook. I got mine for $1400 when the new model came out and PB was selling the previous model cheaply, I suppose to get rid of their old stock. That option has the advantage you get warranty from the date of purchase—which worked out well for me when my MacBook's logic board failed several days before the warranty expiry!

But I'm sure a cheap PC laptop would do fine. That plus the University's free Office 365 subscription would be the best value for your money.

- James


Thanks for that good points




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  Reply # 1622646 4-Sep-2016 20:35
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I also agree with the above. I am largely anti-apple however I must say my sisters MacBook Air has really been quite good to her during her studies, also has lasted incredibly well since she is now a third year student.

 

Far more expensive - however if it is the only computer then yes I'd recommend either a MacBook (likely to last) or a Microsoft Surface and a Chromebook as a secondary device.





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  Reply # 1622734 4-Sep-2016 21:13
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KiwiSurfer: Some counter-points to the above:- - I have experienced periods of time where the computer labs have been completely full, so laptops are pretty much the only way to guarantee you can complete your assignments etc (especially when there are multiple assignments due at the same time!). - Universities won't (always) provide devices if needed—I've had one test where we were required to bring our own laptop (or tablet if it had to come to that but that was discouraged) to write an in-class essay electronically. Some students asked for the option to write it on paper and was told no, a device must be brought in. These students ended up borrowing laptops etc to complete that test. - Having a laptop allows you to take notes in class. I see many students using OneNote during class. Some even use PowerPoint's notes function. Others just use Notes/Word/etc to take down their notes. I don't use these myself but I've seen them used often enough that it seems like a viable option for people who prefer to take notes during class. Try keeping an eye on PB Tech if you want a cheap MacBook. I got mine for $1400 when the new model came out and PB was selling the previous model cheaply, I suppose to get rid of their old stock. That option has the advantage you get warranty from the date of purchase—which worked out well for me when my MacBook's logic board failed several days before the warranty expiry! But I'm sure a cheap PC laptop would do fine. That plus the University's free Office 365 subscription would be the best value for your money. - James


All fair points.

DamageInc: Morning,
Wondering if anyone is using a chromebook, how's the experience going etc?

Daughter is off to uni next year and was thinking of getting her one.


With a Chromebook you need access to the internet in order to use Google Docs, right? You'll need to consider the reliablility of the Wi-Fi at her Uni if that's the case. My Uni's Wi-Fi coverage is really good, but you'll get the odd day where it will be a bit unreliable. Not what you want if you've got an assignment due.

You could also look at the Apple refurbished store.

If you do buy new, buy direct from Apple using Education Store, it will save you around $90 on a Macbook Air. Check around first though, as there could be a special somewhere else that is cheaper.


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