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24 posts

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Topic # 205803 28-Nov-2016 00:25
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Hey guys, so I've been thinking about this for a while, I'm 17, turning 18 in march so I thought around this time would be a good time to do something like this and what I'm thinking of doing is starting a little phone screen repair business and possible small laptop repairs. I just don't really know where to begin so I thought I'd come here to get some advice. Like where to buy repair kits because I know that every brand of phone has a kit to repair it right? And also where to buy the new screens and stuff. Anyways thanks for any help guys, I'll check back here tomorrow :)


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Uber Geek
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  Reply # 1678592 28-Nov-2016 00:52
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This guy left school as he was so busy fixing his peers phones he didn't see why it was worth finishing.
Excellent Service is his real point of difference, Try ring him up and see if he has any tips?
https://m.facebook.com/imenditnz

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Master Geek
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  Reply # 1681201 2-Dec-2016 11:41
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It's great that you're thinking about entrepreneurship. First things first, so let's get started. Before you even think about spending money buying tools or whatever you might need, you should create a plan. I know, it's a complex topic, and it requires lots of time, but it'd help you on a long term. I'll list a few questions to help you brainstorm clear ideas for your business. A business plan helps you to:

 

Define your business
Understand the market
Define your product/service
Outline go-to-market strategy
Create an operating plan

 


1) Articulate the problem you plan to solve.

 

Who has the problem?

 

How big is this problem?

 

2) Sizing the market

 

Business or consumers?

 

What’s their demographic?

 

When it comes to your business area, what do they fear?

 

How big is the market?

 

3) Defining your product/service/solution

 

It’s all about deliverables - Be specific - Use Numbers

 

4) Determining your revenue model

 

How will you make money?
One time?
Recurring? Subscription charges?
Cross-sell? Upsell?
Add-ons that complement the product or service?
How are similar products/services priced by the others suppliers?
What are your customers willing to pay?

 


5) Know yourself/your business using a SWOT analysis - strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats

 

6) Marketing strategy

 

How will you reach your customers? What are the channels you’re going to use?
Direct?

 

7) Defining points of differentiation

 

Highlight what makes you different and how it delivers better performance in comparison with other suppliers. 

 

8) Pricing your product/service

 

 

 

I was trying to keep it short, but as you see, there are lots to think about (and more), but it is quite rewarding when your business become successful.


 
 
 
 


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Geek
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  Reply # 1686780 13-Dec-2016 03:20
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While I agree that a proper business plan is usually a good idea, for an 18 year old starting something from his parents garage with very low capital outlay I am not sure it is needed.

 

I wonder if Bill Gates had a business plan? 

 

 

 

The main issue is how to get customers. You will need a website with some quite a bit of good writing about fixing screens and laptop on it and do some basic SEO yourself if you can. 

 

Start a facebook page as well. Promote it all on forums and Trademe. Keep an eye out on forums for folks looking to fix phones. I guess also approach shops in your town where people may ask about repairs and let them know you offer the service. 

 

Keep good records of all income and expenses , when it starts to do better you need to get someone to do the books for you.

 

How are you going to take payment from clients and will you require a deposit?

 

As for finding parts like screens, best is to google it. You will find issues with delay in getting the parts while the customer wants it done yesterday.

 

You may find a site like Alibaba a good source of parts, but make sure the person you are buying from has a good reputation.

 

Good luck and feel free to ask any other questions.


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Geek
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  Reply # 1709913 26-Jan-2017 11:01
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 Agree with vpsnine here. You'll want to be active in as many ways as you can. Not only that, but have something that sets you apart. There are a lot (and I mean a LOT) of businesses and individuals that do this stuff already (if my Facebook feed is anything to go by), but there's nothing stopping you from giving it a go and standing out from the crowd. Some tips to build on vpsnine's:

 

 

 

1. A website is important. A Facebook page is great (you'll want one of those too), but a website gives you a lot of legitimacy and helps you stand out from the crowd. People are a lot more likely to trust someone who has a professional looking website than just a dodgy looking Facebook page. As ever, SEO will play an important part here so people can find you. A lot of the basics you can do yourself. This is a great place to start ( https://www.found.co.nz/search-engine-optimisation/ ).

 

2. Don't forget the power of Facebook! Join as many Facebook Buy / Sell / Swap groups as you can. You'll be surprised how much business is done through groups like this. Hell, it's where my family's now growing home business started. 

 

3. Looks matter. Don't just throw some bright text onto a bland background in MS Paint and call it a day. If you're able (arty friends? Family?), get something approaching a professional logo. Even if it is just a catchy business name in fancy text. A lot of the existing places look...dodgy at best. Stand out! Get images that fit. That are the right size. Basic stuff matters. This guide should help with this (https://havecamerawilltravel.com/photographer/images-photos-facebook-sizes-dimensions-types

 

That's probably about as far as my expertise goes :P Hopefully those are helpful. Keep us updated on how you go! 


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Wannabe Geek
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  Reply # 1727473 28-Feb-2017 09:48
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The way I think this normally works is this scenario: you're a young guy who has some impressive skills when it comes to taking things apart and putting them back together. A friend drops their phone and the screen breaks and you tell them "I reckon I could fix that for you." You source a new screen, figure out how to take it apart and you fix it up for your friend, and just charge him/her for the replacement parts. Your friend is so happy that when their uncle drops his phone you say "hey, my friend could fix that" and next thing their uncle is phoning you. Next thing, your uncle is telling two friends, and his two friends each tell two friends, and so on. After a while you're getting so many inquiries that you decide you need to be rewarded for your time, so you charge $100 (plus parts) to fix any phone. You place some fliers on local noticeboards, set up a Facebook page etc. and suddenly find you're swamped with people needing phones/laptops/ipads fixed.

 

Soon you have so much work coming in it becomes your fulltime job, and even then you're having trouble keeping up with all the work coming in, so you think about hiring some help.

 

And so on and so forth.

 

I think it's best to let a business evolve from a hobby than to try and start from nothing and force the creation of a business. That will inevitably lead to big spending, frustration, and heartache.


IcI

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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 1727497 28-Feb-2017 10:20
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@vpsnine: ...I wonder if Bill Gates had a business plan?  ...

 

After so many years in the IT industry, I think it's possible that he actually did have one.

 

 

 

Either way, the OP will need to find something to differentiate him from the countless others out there. And remember, competing on price is a race to the bottom. Two things that s/he could leverage is prximity to a specific location and word of mouth advertising. Build a positive & visible reputation.





Please keep this GZ community vibrant by contributing in a constructive & respectful manner.


3 posts

Wannabe Geek


  Reply # 1730257 5-Mar-2017 09:34
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There is much good advice in the posts so far, however I have to agree most strongly with the first post especially the very first point. 

 

I would also add  what is your immediate goal.  create or replace a job, create a lifestyle income, build a business to sell and reinvest in something else or are you planning global domination.

 

The one and only focus is to embark on a client discovery and validation process  (Forget about everything and anything else you don't need a business plan as you don't have a business you have an idea)

 

 

 

First look for problem/solution fit 

 

What is the problem you solve? 

 

Is the problem big enough that customers want to solve it (remember any problem if it is serious enough people will already have a solution of sorts )

 

is it painful enough that they want to solve the problem in an exchange of value ( money)

 

Then look for solution market/fit 

 

Is your point of difference sufficient that they will want to solve it with you 

 

Are there enough of these motivated customers who are prepared to exchange value that you can achieve your original objectives 

 

if you get to this point then you need to determine your Business model and from that and start to write a business plan.

 

The buisness plan is the result of the process not the start of it

 

For clarity of the process  I recommend    "Value Proposition design"   by  Alex Oterwalder & assoc  and anything on customer development  by Prof Steve Blank

 

 

 

Disclosure: I have no connection with the above two sources other than I believe to date they encompass some of the clearest thinking and 'how to' advice available on this subject.   I am also a business mentor with Business Mentors NZ. 


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  Reply # 1730260 5-Mar-2017 09:37
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deathLynX:

 

Hey guys, so I've been thinking about this for a while, I'm 17, turning 18 in march so I thought around this time would be a good time to do something like this and what I'm thinking of doing is starting a little phone screen repair business and possible small laptop repairs. I just don't really know where to begin so I thought I'd come here to get some advice. Like where to buy repair kits because I know that every brand of phone has a kit to repair it right? And also where to buy the new screens and stuff. Anyways thanks for any help guys, I'll check back here tomorrow :)

 

 

That sounds like you have this idea, but you don't know how to repair them? Otherwise you would know that. Just an observation not a criticism. If you wanted too start a small business, you would really need to be an expert in that area


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  Reply # 1730261 5-Mar-2017 09:41
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domainsdirect:

 

The way I think this normally works is this scenario: you're a young guy who has some impressive skills when it comes to taking things apart and putting them back together. A friend drops their phone and the screen breaks and you tell them "I reckon I could fix that for you." You source a new screen, figure out how to take it apart and you fix it up for your friend, and just charge him/her for the replacement parts. Your friend is so happy that when their uncle drops his phone you say "hey, my friend could fix that" and next thing their uncle is phoning you. Next thing, your uncle is telling two friends, and his two friends each tell two friends, and so on. After a while you're getting so many inquiries that you decide you need to be rewarded for your time, so you charge $100 (plus parts) to fix any phone. You place some fliers on local noticeboards, set up a Facebook page etc. and suddenly find you're swamped with people needing phones/laptops/ipads fixed.

 

Soon you have so much work coming in it becomes your fulltime job, and even then you're having trouble keeping up with all the work coming in, so you think about hiring some help.

 

And so on and so forth.

 

I think it's best to let a business evolve from a hobby than to try and start from nothing and force the creation of a business. That will inevitably lead to big spending, frustration, and heartache.

 

 

Great points. The work can be the odd night, then its a few nights a week, then bits of the weekend. Then you decide to get a part time job and leave the full time job, and so on.

 

Let it evolve based on time available, income needs. You don't need to spend heaps of money and time setting up, then open for business, drinking coffee all day as you don't yet have any customers. 


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Master Geek
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  Reply # 1768474 21-Apr-2017 14:01
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I think this idea has potential and it is worth trying as it requires little initial investment.

 

I agree with the others that a website will be essential at one point but to start off with, why don´t you reach out to your friends and family, using Twitter, Facebook etc. and see if there is maybe some demand in your close circles? That would allow you to start of slowly with little to no initial costs and it can also help to get you some traction through word-of-mouth advertisement. Once you get more orders you can secure your domain name and start thinking about developing a website.

 

In the long run, my only concern would be that mobile phone and computer screens continuously improve and become harder to break. That might be potentially slowing down the business in future.


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  Reply # 1768509 21-Apr-2017 15:29
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deathLynX:

 

Hey guys, so I've been thinking about this for a while, I'm 17, turning 18 in march so I thought around this time would be a good time to do something like this and what I'm thinking of doing is starting a little phone screen repair business and possible small laptop repairs. I just don't really know where to begin so I thought I'd come here to get some advice. Like where to buy repair kits because I know that every brand of phone has a kit to repair it right? And also where to buy the new screens and stuff. Anyways thanks for any help guys, I'll check back here tomorrow :)

 

 

Start with the ifixit crowd and see if they will sell kits to you - this will get you started on what you need as parts etc.

 

 

 

Remember, what you offer is the 'i'll do it for you' bit - which means you take ownership for correcting cockups and stuff. The moment you start offering a paid-for service, you fall under the Fair Trading Act and Consumer Guarentees Act....





________

 

Antonios K

 

 

 

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