Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.




403 posts

Ultimate Geek


#150305 17-Jul-2014 22:18
Send private message

Hi guys,

I am planning to replace an existing 30-year old aluminium sliding door. The ali joinery suppliers did not offered safety glass (any of them). The opening is approx 2.4W x 1.9H, the fixed part is divided in three sections (by 2 transoms) and the sliding door has only one transom aligned with the lower one from the fixed section...

What is your understanding / expectation regarding safety glass and code compliance? This job is not part of a larger job with a Building Consent, I will just get the ali joinery guys to make a new door and replace the old one (no consent, no inspections, I do not believe something like this would be required anyway). My worry is that years later when I move out, the new owner might ask why there is no safety glass in the sliding doors? If the door is 30-year old there is no expectation for this, but for a new one?

if safety glass would make sense, where should it be installed on the double glazing panel? Inside? outside? Or maybe both sides? All the ali joinery manufacturers I contacted about this job advised me that it is very uncommon to have safety glass in the sliding doors. It was something to do with the presence or absence of a divider (transom) in the pane of glass. A transom would work as a "vision bar", you cannot go through the glass when the door is closed, because you see the door is closed. No transom, no visual indication and then you MIGHT try to go through the glass... But I could not find anything definitive in the Building Code... there is something about wet / slippery areas (bathroom/laundry) but that is all.

any idea where to look for something "in writing" for peace of mind, would be much appreciated.
Thank you.




mobo Intel DH55PJ, RAM: 4GB RAM, Nova-T 500 HD + Avermedia Trinity tuner card, Geforce 520 video, 120GB SSD Sandisk + 640 WD + 1000SG, Win7 Home Prem 64-bit, Media Portal 1.15.0; BTC 9019URF Cordless Keyboard, Panasonic 55" (HDMI cable), HTPC Case Silverstone Grandia GD05B.


Create new topic
302 posts

Ultimate Geek

Lifetime subscriber

  #1091076 17-Jul-2014 22:26
Send private message

I think you will find that if it is divided into 3 sections safety glass will not be required. It all depends on the area of glass. NZS 4223:PART 3:1999 sets out the requirements. The  Glass Association of NZ puts out a guide to the standard.
This is a link to it 
http://www.metroglasstech.co.nz/catalogue/documents/201_Human_Impact_Safety_Flow_Chart.pdf

15858 posts

Uber Geek


  #1091077 17-Jul-2014 22:30
Send private message

It is covered in  NZ standards somewhere, I believe is it NZS 4223. But don't quote me on this, but having dividers  in the doors may eliminate the need for safety glass in some situations. The window manufacturers should know the requirements anyway. However I believe you may need a building consent for that work anyway if it is a new window, as if it isn't detailed properly it may leak. Best thing to do is ask your council as they should also know the rules.

 
 
 
 




403 posts

Ultimate Geek


  #1091371 18-Jul-2014 13:00
Send private message

Thank you for the link to the Metro Glasstech document, I will have a good look at that (it looks comprehensive).
This is not a new door, I am replacing an old door with a new one, there is no building work to alter the structure or the cladding in any way.
The ali joinery guys re-assured me this kind of work is never submitted to Council as it is "replace like for like" situation.
After studying the safety glass "chart" I will know exactly what to ask.

This is great help, thank you.




mobo Intel DH55PJ, RAM: 4GB RAM, Nova-T 500 HD + Avermedia Trinity tuner card, Geforce 520 video, 120GB SSD Sandisk + 640 WD + 1000SG, Win7 Home Prem 64-bit, Media Portal 1.15.0; BTC 9019URF Cordless Keyboard, Panasonic 55" (HDMI cable), HTPC Case Silverstone Grandia GD05B.


15858 posts

Uber Geek


  #1091379 18-Jul-2014 13:09
Send private message

aucklander: Thank you for the link to the Metro Glasstech document, I will have a good look at that (it looks comprehensive).
This is not a new door, I am replacing an old door with a new one, there is no building work to alter the structure or the cladding in any way.
The ali joinery guys re-assured me this kind of work is never submitted to Council as it is "replace like for like" situation.
After studying the safety glass "chart" I will know exactly what to ask.

This is great help, thank you.


I would be careful with the like for like thing, as they would need to be identical types.eg replacing timber with aluminium, or replacing aluminium with PVC wouldn't be like for like.  Also some aluminium windows use different types of profiles and flashjng systems, including if you are moving to double glazing which may need a different profile .  I would still check with council and get it in writing. because insurers can decline claims in unconsented works when they should have been

3171 posts

Uber Geek

Subscriber

  #1091406 18-Jul-2014 13:44
Send private message

The latest Schedule 1 to the Building Act "Building work that does not require a building consent" exemption 8
"This exemption allows you to carry out any building work in connection with a
window (including a roof window, whether it is fixed or opening) or an exterior
doorway without needing a building consent where it is an existing dwelling or
outbuilding. That is as long as the original doorway or window has not failed
prematurely and replacing it will not modify or affect any specified system (eg
sprinklers or fire alarms)."

The latest version of this exemption doesn't have the previous restriction that the lintel couldn't be changed.

It would be mickey mouse if you could do anything involving fitting or removing a door without a consent but some other aspect like weatherstripping meant that a consent was required anyway.

15858 posts

Uber Geek


  #1091422 18-Jul-2014 14:18
Send private message

I would treat most work that involves the exterior envelope as needing a consent, and getting clarification from the council in writing if they think it is okay to proceed without it. Like for like is subjective, and could easily be challenged if it isn't identical. I also wouldn't trust builders knowledge, as I have seen things replaced before that needed consent, but the builder said it didn't because they considered it was like for like, but the council didn't. Thus the house was sold with unconsented work, as building consents are not retrospective. Insurers will also look for ways out for declining claims, so the small amount for a consent is worth the piece of mind, plus they will independently check  it is flashed properly.

3267 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted

  #1091706 18-Jul-2014 20:02
Send private message

I'll second getting the council to confirm in writing, not just a phone call.  Or record it.  We built a new home on a section while living in the old home, removed the old when the new was finished.  Council said over the phone it is fine, no resource consent needed as long as removing the old house is part of the building consent.  But when our builders did the building consent, the council would not allow it without a resource consent for 2 building temporary on one site.  The resource consent was for the impact on the neighbours, extra traffic, etc.  Cost us a few thousand dollars and a month delay just because we did not have record that they said it is okay.




You can never have enough Volvos!


Create new topic



Twitter and LinkedIn »



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:





News »

Huawei introduces the P40 Series of Android-based smartphones
Posted 31-Mar-2020 17:03


Samsung Galaxy Z Flip now available for pre-order in New Zealand
Posted 31-Mar-2020 16:39


New online learning platform for kids stuck at home during COVID-19 lockdown
Posted 26-Mar-2020 21:35


New 5G Nokia smartphone unveiled as portfolio expands
Posted 26-Mar-2020 17:11


D-Link ANZ launches wireless AC1200 4G LTE router
Posted 26-Mar-2020 16:32


Ring introduces two new video doorbells and new pre-roll technology
Posted 17-Mar-2020 16:59


OPPO uncovers flagship Find X2 Pro smartphone
Posted 17-Mar-2020 16:54


D-Link COVR-2202 mesh Wi-Fi system now protected by McAfee
Posted 17-Mar-2020 16:00


Spark Sport opens its platform up to all New Zealanders at no charge
Posted 17-Mar-2020 10:04


Spark launches 5G Starter Fund
Posted 8-Mar-2020 19:19


TRENDnet launches high-performance WiFi Mesh Router System
Posted 5-Mar-2020 08:48


Sony boosts full-frame lens line-up with introduction of FE 20mm F1.8 G large-aperture ultra-wide-angle prime Lens
Posted 5-Mar-2020 08:44


Vector and Spark teamed up on smart metering initiative
Posted 5-Mar-2020 08:42


Schneider Electric launches new PDL Pro Series designed specifically for the commercial building market
Posted 5-Mar-2020 08:39


Kiwi app Pedigree DentaStix Studios uses pet images to counter impact of negative social media Content
Posted 5-Mar-2020 08:32



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.


Support Geekzone »

Our community of supporters help make Geekzone possible. Click the button below to join them.

Support Geezone on PressPatron



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.