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trig42

5045 posts

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#154546 31-Oct-2014 10:30
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I need to run a line for a water inlet to a fridge (for Ice/Water).

I have easy access under the house from our water pump (we are on tank water) to the location of the fridge in the kitchen.

The plumbing in the house is Buteline from the pump outwards (it is alkathene from the tank to the pump).

I can either:

a) Install a double tap where I have currently got a single (next to the pump, but under the house in an undeveloped 'basement'/storage area), and run alkathene using Anka joints/bends a short distance into the water filter/pressure reducing valve that came with the fridge (fridge kit contains a 15mm adaptor down to it's PRV then through the filter into the fridge with a 6mm 4m hose). Pretty easy to work with 15mm alkathene and Anka joins.

b0 Get some Buteline and install a 'T' junction before aforementioned tap and install another tap (inline) then to a 15mm screw for the filter kit. I would need to get hold of a Buteline crimping tool though (I don't have one and they are pretty expensive I think).

Which do you think would be better? Does Anka withstand the pressure of a domestic water pump ok? Do places lend out/rent Buteline crimp tools?

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KShips
150 posts

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  #1165616 31-Oct-2014 10:38
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I'm no expert but have you looked at the push fit adapters which work with Buteline, saves using crimping tool? Similar style to these http://www.bunnings.co.nz/speedfit-elbow-connector-20mm-jge20_p00314846



trig42

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  #1165621 31-Oct-2014 10:41
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Ahh, did not know about them.
They work with the same pressure the aklathene ANKA joints do, so they could well do the trick. I have no idea how much pressure my pump outputs. 12bar sounds like a lot though.

 
 
 
 


KShips
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  #1165628 31-Oct-2014 10:45
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Not sure but I know people who have used them on town supply and work fine (at least I think I'm talking about the right thing laughing ) I've got one at home so if think about it will post name of it, Mitre10 and Bunnings stock them though.



trig42

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  #1165643 31-Oct-2014 10:46
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Does speedfit connect to normal Buteline? ie. How would I connect it to the existing plumbing?

KShips
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  #1165651 31-Oct-2014 10:56
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Not sure if it speedfit would work or not.

You could use either option you mentioned, the fittings have T adapters, screw fittings etc. Basically I think whatever Buteline fittings you have seen are likely also available in push-fit style.



Jeeves
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  #1165662 31-Oct-2014 11:06
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I'm not an expert either but when I had a buteline t-joint spring a leak, the plumber I spoke to and the guy at the plumbing shop both steered me well away from speedfit connections. 
You can hire crimpers - ask your local plumber where from. It cost me like $20 I think.  Do it once, do it right I say.


Sidestep
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  #1165669 31-Oct-2014 11:18
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trig42: Ahh, did not know about them.
They work with the same pressure the aklathene ANKA joints do, so they could well do the trick. I have no idea how much pressure my pump outputs. 12bar sounds like a lot though.


The pressure controller on your pump probably has the range in kPa (kilopascals). I'm pretty sure you multiply bar x 100 to get kPa.

If you have 12 bar of pressure (around 400' of head) your showers would be GREAT!

 
 
 
 


trig42

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  #1165674 31-Oct-2014 11:23
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Haha, showers aren't bad - they were better before we put a pressure reducing thingy in the head (to save water), but they have never been a waterblaster! Certainly wouldn't have 400' of head.

I will see if the local hardware store or hire place has a crimping tool. 

DarthKermit
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  #1165814 31-Oct-2014 12:42
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Whereabouts are you located? I know a guy in Palmerston North with one of those crimping tools.




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nickb800
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  #1165820 31-Oct-2014 12:47
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Jeeves: I'm not an expert either but when I had a buteline t-joint spring a leak, the plumber I spoke to and the guy at the plumbing shop both steered me well away from speedfit connections. 
You can hire crimpers - ask your local plumber where from. It cost me like $20 I think.  Do it once, do it right I say.



As in, speedfit to buteline wasn't a good idea, or speedfit in general wasn't good?


Jeeves
302 posts

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  #1165916 31-Oct-2014 14:11
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In general. I can't remember the exact reason but it was something along the lines of less reliable, doesn't last as long. It make sense if you think about it - the power of your wrist twisting something into place vs the power of a mechanical crimper. I know which one I would trust more :)

trig42

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  #1165917 31-Oct-2014 14:15
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I think I have found a crimping tool, which is good because I'm pretty sure our local hardware store (placemakers) wont have the quickfit bits I need, but I know they have a good range of the crimp bits.

Bung
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  #1165947 31-Oct-2014 15:17
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Jeeves: In general. I can't remember the exact reason but it was something along the lines of less reliable, doesn't last as long. It make sense if you think about it - the power of your wrist twisting something into place vs the power of a mechanical crimper. I know which one I would trust more :)


Or it could be just some voodoo FUD.

I haven't used Speedfit but have used the Acorn/Hepworth/Leap style. The sealing is by an O ring and the polybute is held by a ss grab ring. If you push the pipe in the required distance it can't come out. There are probably as many tales of crimp connectors failing including the occasional crimp that just doesn't get done properly.

Mitre10 used to have the Hep2O style push fit in the Plumb It range (plastic bag blue cardboard tag). Bunnings had them bagged in shelf bins.

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