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#195676 29-Apr-2016 14:05
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Hi guys, 

 

I've got a few projects around the house I want to do:

 

1) Install new powerpoint in wall where the TV is setup

 

2) Install outdoor light

 

3) Install additional switch for laundry lights so switch is next to external door.

 

4) Install new powerpoint outside on deck.

 

Now before anyone jumps down my throat, I'm not going to hook it up to the switchboard myself, I'll get a registered sparky in for that, but what I can do is buy all the components myself and run the cable to avoid paying chump rates. I've already done similar to install two outside caravan power points on 6mm TPS. I just have a few questions regarding what cable I need.

 

So based on previous experience, I need 2.5mm TPS 2C+E for the powerpoints, I've been told I only need 1.5mm for the new light. Can I use the same 1.5mm for the additional switch?

 

I'm estimating I need about 50m of TPS 1.5mm for both lighting projects and another 50m of 2.5mm for the powerpoints. I'm trying to decide whether to just use 2.5mm for both and get a 100m roll.

 

Also people have told me to get flat TPS over circular TPS, but I found last time it was harder to run flat TPS because it keeps kinking, is there that much of a difference?

 

Finally the lighting diagrams I've been able to find show 3core + earth, is it 2C+E or 3C+E in NZ?

 

Thanks for the help! 


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  #1544025 29-Apr-2016 14:15
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No reason not to use 2.5mm for the entire job.  I've never seen round TPS used in fixed wiring, but cannot think of a good reason not to use it.  NZ lighting usually uses 2C+E.

 

Your tame sparky would need to see the SDOCs for the fittings and TPS you supply before he could sign the job off.  Perhaps talk to the Sparky first.  You might struggle to find one who will do labour only.

 

Source:  Was an apprentice sparky 20 years ago and I keep half an ear on the industry.





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  #1544027 29-Apr-2016 14:20
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Difference between 2c+E and 3 core is the colours, 2c+E is red, Black, green, 3c is red, white, blue.

 

Where ever you get your parts from you will need the SDOC's for each item, your electrician will need those in order to legally sign the COC after job completion.

 

 

 

Power 2.5 2c+E

 

New lights 1.0 or 1.5 2c+E (depending on what you already have installed)

 

2 way switching either 1.0 or 1.5 3c depending on what is already in place (you cannot use 2c+E for 2 way switching, green earth wire is only allowed to be used as an earth, nothing else)

 

any new outlets also need to be RCD protected.

 

 

 

 


 
 
 
 


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  #1544028 29-Apr-2016 14:23
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Greg, are you not allowed to 'sleeve' the earth wire any more with another colour to identify the wire as being used for another purpose?  Just curious.  It was never an ideal practise.





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  #1544033 29-Apr-2016 14:40
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 Thanks for the replies.

 

 

 

I'm buying all the parts of reputable traders, either bunnings or Ideal Electrical etc. so that won't be a problem. I've already got two electricians who are fine to do labour only providing my cabling matches their needs (which they've previously checked and it has complied. 

 

I've got some spare RCD slots currently, but I might add the outside one to a new RCD because I want that separated from the rest.

 

Thanks for the help!


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  #1544048 29-Apr-2016 15:05
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Do you mean spare RCD or spare Circuit Breaker? I think from memory you can now have three circuits on the same RCD (40A?) but you might prefer to put some of the new wiring on their own circuit breakers. Or at the least be able to add it to an existing RCD.  


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  #1544059 29-Apr-2016 15:13
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Dynamic:

 

Greg, are you not allowed to 'sleeve' the earth wire any more with another colour to identify the wire as being used for another purpose?  Just curious.  It was never an ideal practise.

 

 

 

 

There were some very specific changes a number of years back, due to mainly people using the green as part of the 2 way light switching and it causing problems. Basically green or green/yellow can only be used for earth and nothing else


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  #1544062 29-Apr-2016 15:19
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Disrespective:

 

Do you mean spare RCD or spare Circuit Breaker? I think from memory you can now have three circuits on the same RCD (40A?) but you might prefer to put some of the new wiring on their own circuit breakers. Or at the least be able to add it to an existing RCD.  

 

 

3 sub circuits per RCD is the current rule, it used to be all outlets must be protected by an RCD, so the cowboys would have one RCCB supplying all the outlets, more common was to have 2 so in the event of a RCD trip you loose 1/2 your lights and power instead of everything.

 

 

 

More sensible way is to use an RCBO on each circuit so you only loose the faulty circuit.

 

 

 

Just make sure the RCD you select is a 2 pole, the older ones were only 1 pole and were compliant at the time, current regs require the use of  2 pole units.

 

 

 

 

 

 


 
 
 
 


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  #1544084 29-Apr-2016 16:08
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And all the regs are up for change again. I really feel sorry for sparkys with things beiung auch a moving target with changes for an industry that really results in stuff all deaths when things are actually followed.

 

Talk to the sparky that will be signing the cert first, as what they say goes and if you have done anything different they will probably just walk rather than risk it.





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  #1544085 29-Apr-2016 16:11
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Depending on the type of lights you are running 1mm TPS is fine, 2.5mm TPS for lights is overkill. 

 

1mm for short runs of low watt bulbs or 1.5 for long runs and high watt bulbs i.e. anything over 50 watt.

 

Also if you are installing an outside socket it need to be an outdoor rated socket and be on a RCD.




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  #1544101 29-Apr-2016 16:56
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Thanks guys, yeah I have some spare 'slots' on my RCDs that I installed for my prior outdoor plugs, so I'll get the sparky to use those. 

 

I'll go with the 1.5mm for lighting and 2.5mm 2C for the switches, so I guess I have to buy multiple rolls - anyone want to split a 100m roll? I'm gonna get it for $1.38, screw paying $3/m. I got an account at Ideal Electrical thinking it was going to be cheaper than bunnings, jokes on me, it's  the same price. 

 

 Whatr's the cost difference between an RCD and an RCBO ? Or does the latter take longer to install or what?

 

 


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  #1544116 29-Apr-2016 17:30
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RCD only offers RCD protection, you need to put over current downstream of it. One RCD can do up to 3 circuit breakers because of a limitation they made which has really just reduced the number of circuits that get installed in most small houses to 6, so 3 on each RCD.

 

RCBO has O for overload in it as well, so each slot will trip independantly when the idiot flatmate leaves a powerstrip outside to get rained on and not take half the house with it.





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  #1544133 29-Apr-2016 17:37
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Either very brave or very foolish sparkies.

 

 

 

Because you are doing it yourself, it legally requires you to have it signed off by an Electrical inspector,

 

and electrician can NOT do that.

 

 




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  #1544136 29-Apr-2016 17:41
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How does running TPS under a house require an electrical inspector?


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  #1544152 29-Apr-2016 18:17
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sir1963:

 

Either very brave or very foolish sparkies.

 

 

 

Because you are doing it yourself, it legally requires you to have it signed off by an Electrical inspector,

 

and electrician can NOT do that.

 

 

 

 

 

 

if the electrician wants to take responsibility they can sign it off, otherwise an inspector needs to sign off before it is livened

 

 


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  #1544153 29-Apr-2016 18:19
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Willuknight:

 

How does running TPS under a house require an electrical inspector?

 

 

 

 

Because it is prescribed electrical work


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