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Topic # 198688 19-Jul-2016 09:53
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Hi,

 

After seeing the "Hacking garage door opener" thread I thought I'd start my own to ask about garage door openers for my specific needs.

 

We are soon getting power installed into our standalone single garage. And one of the first things we will want in there is a garage door opener.

 

Ours is a tilter door, but I see most doors openers seem to specify they are for either sectional or roller doors. Obviously a roller door option can't work for us, but do sectional door openers work with tilter doors - or do you need an opener specifically designed for tilter doors?

 

Ideally something that already had wifi for monitoring and remote open/close functionality would be great, but I suspect in NZ that isn't going to come "out of the box". So I suspect that will be a project for later.

 

Since it is a standalone garage with no internal access, I would like to be able to open it from the outside without needing the remote (which will be in my car). I see Merlin doors have programmable wireless keypads for this type of entry, so something like that mounted to the outside of the garage would be suitable.

 

What would peoples recommendations be based on my criteria:

 

1. Works with tilter door.

 

2. Can open and close the garage from outside without the remote (keypad entry or similar).

 

3. Will not prevent me from adding some sort of wifi monitoring and control later.

 

Thanks





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  Reply # 1594888 19-Jul-2016 10:07
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Same openers used for tilt and sectional doors.  Roller doors use a different type of opener.

 

As well as keypad (which is an optional extra), if there's no other access then you need to set up a system so that you can open the door if there's a power outage or the auto opener fails.  Usually a key lock in the door, with barrel which comes forward and out, attached by wire to the lever which disengages the opener from the pole.

 

I quite like the openers sold by Windsor, they seem reliable and easy to set up.  They should be able to supply the extras, keypad and lock.  You may be able to forego the external keypad and the hassle wiring it up. the auto units come with several remotes, usually one with a faceplate mount so you could put it somewhere like inside the front door of the house.  


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  Reply # 1594903 19-Jul-2016 10:22
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I'm not personally vouching for these as I don't have one, but Dominator offers keypad entry and smartphone control options for (some of?) their doors. See here: http://www.dominator.co.nz/upgrades/ 


 
 
 
 




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  Reply # 1594916 19-Jul-2016 10:48
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Fred99:

 

Same openers used for tilt and sectional doors.  Roller doors use a different type of opener.

 

As well as keypad (which is an optional extra), if there's no other access then you need to set up a system so that you can open the door if there's a power outage or the auto opener fails.  Usually a key lock in the door, with barrel which comes forward and out, attached by wire to the lever which disengages the opener from the pole.

 

I quite like the openers sold by Windsor, they seem reliable and easy to set up.  They should be able to supply the extras, keypad and lock.  You may be able to forego the external keypad and the hassle wiring it up. the auto units come with several remotes, usually one with a faceplate mount so you could put it somewhere like inside the front door of the house.  

 

 

Good to know that tilt and sectional doors use the same openers, thanks.

 

There's also a side door to the garage, but not an ideal location to use as the main entrance - although perfectly suitable for entrance should power or opener fail.

 

I think a lot of the keypads are wireless (maybe not all brands), so extra cabling shouldn't be required. I think I'd rather the keypad than another remote in the hopuse, as I can't see the garage door from the house so don't want to use it "blind".


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  Reply # 1594923 19-Jul-2016 11:00
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I put one of these in (or something very like it), to replace an existing one. Doing a replacement was easy enough, but you have to be very careful about securing it properly because there's a big load on them, and if it breaks it could damage your car. You can pay people to do it for you, they've done it hundreds of time and are unlikely to make a mistake.





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  Reply # 1594957 19-Jul-2016 11:55
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This is what I'd recommend:

 

http://www.windsordoors.co.nz/index.cfm/door-openers/dc-opener-dc800n-dc1200n/

 

The 800 model should be fine for a single tilt.

 

 




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  Reply # 1595028 19-Jul-2016 13:40
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andrew027:

 

I'm not personally vouching for these as I don't have one, but Dominator offers keypad entry and smartphone control options for (some of?) their doors. See here: http://www.dominator.co.nz/upgrades/ 

 

 

Yeah, they make a vague reference about smartphone control - but it doesn't seems to apply to any of their available openers. A bit strange.


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  Reply # 1595422 20-Jul-2016 08:14
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I know someone who installs garage doors and likes chamberlain - we've got one but most of the models in stock at the hardware store are the cheaper variety you can get the other models by special order the cheaper ones lack the ability to be held open by relay - so instead you have to simulate a pulse from a switch - this means you don't know if the garage door is open or closed and need to either track it via safety laser beams (if they are installed) or other added sensors - which is what I've done on ours - we have magnetic sensors for knowing when the door is closed and when its fully open so the alarm panel can pulse it again if it got stuck half way for example and if I'm honest I always make sure the sectional door goes down as I'm not 100% the logic is perfect.

 

I recently helped program a Toro roller garage door opener (and presume the sectional models have similar functionality) - which I quite liked (though the other person didn't as it was harder to program) - battery backup to keep working, can assign different functions to different buttons on the remote, auto close and while I didn't test it I did see it mentioned "hold mode" (ie panel supplies power on to keep the door open much easier to know what the door is going to do) basically it would integrate with an alarm system a lot better.


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