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Topic # 202060 15-Sep-2016 15:09
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So as mentioned in another thread, I'm in the market for replacing my old single-glazed aluminium-framed windows, at the end of their service life and probably leaking into my walls.

 

Current options are double-glazed aluminium frames with a thermal break, or UPVC.

 

On paper, UPVC seems to tick almost every box: Cheaper, stronger, longer lasting, higher insulation (thermally and acoustically), more secure, more opening options, lower maintenance... However, the only reason I wouldn't choose UPVC is that the frames are so much thicker than aluminium. I experienced UPVC recently in Europe and sort of liked it, but then the houses there are quite architecturally different from here. Smaller panes / thicker frames are not an issue there, but I might feel a bit hemmed in in my own home...

 

Does anyone else have UPVC, or considered getting UPVC but discounted it? What are your thoughts about this product?

 

 

 

Cheers

 

Jon





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  Reply # 1631039 15-Sep-2016 15:29
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I have one french door that I got to replace some hopeless 80s wooden rubbish that was bowed, and it seems to be leaking a lot of rust coloured water from where the insides are rusting. Also they used non stainless fixings for some parts (or might just be crap stainless)





Richard rich.ms

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  Reply # 1631057 15-Sep-2016 15:36
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I would suggest talking to your council, as they should now have an eco design advisor than can give you advice on that very topic, and I believe their advice is impartial which is very important when making product decisions. I was chatting to one yesterday, and they gave the pros and cons of PVC over thermally broken aluminum windows , and one negative they said was UV, as durability was a bit of an unknown in NZs harsh conditions. Aluminum shouldn' t have any issues with UV, except the powder coating which can go powdery over time. But if you get anodized, it should be more durable than powder coating. The other advantage is that you have a choice of colours, and with termally broken ones, you can have a different colour on the inside, from the outside, which is really cool.   More info at http://www.branz.co.nz/eco_design_advisor


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  Reply # 1631068 15-Sep-2016 15:45
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We recently had all of the windows and exterior doors in our 1930s brick bungalow replaced with double glazed UPVC units and couldn't be happier with the result.

 

We were coming from very old wooden frames so the difference in thickness wasn't too noticible, except for in the bathroom which was an already small window on the south side. We chose the tilt-and-turn over the push out awning type, which I think makes them slightly ticker again but the utility of the opening mechanism is worth it.

 

Definitely noticed a immediate difference in the internal temperature (we are in Dunedin) notwithstanding this past winter being relatively mild, and no more drafts.


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  Reply # 1631135 15-Sep-2016 17:25
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We had all our doors and windows replaced with uPVC, really happy with their appearance and thermal properties.Their acoustic insulation isn't as good as my thick old wooden windows, which had a second pane of 3mm PVC as retrofit double glazing. I think it's because it's only two pieces of PVC keeping noise out, there are spacers under the glass so it's just PVC, air, PVC behind the frames. If a company was really onto it they might be able to reduce the noise a bit, but ThermalFrame didn't.

 

I'd get them again for sure. Just be sure to maintain them. Thermalframe doesn't give maintenance instructions, and apparently you need to spray the metal bits with silicone every 3-6 months to prevent rust. I had one older window, 3 years I think, with a tiny bit of surface rust they eventually fixed up with light sanding.





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  Reply # 1631139 15-Sep-2016 17:29
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richms:

 

I have one french door that I got to replace some hopeless 80s wooden rubbish that was bowed, and it seems to be leaking a lot of rust coloured water from where the insides are rusting. Also they used non stainless fixings for some parts (or might just be crap stainless)

 

 

 

 

Nothing really wrong with timber doors, as long as they are well maintained and the timber is protected from the elements. If they get constant water into the actual timber, and they haven't been painted or need repainting, then they will absorb the water and bow. What are the doors you replaced them with?. There are also different grades of stainless, some will corrode on the surface, but that should come off, you need marine grade and then it shouldn't corrode (as much)


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  Reply # 1631178 15-Sep-2016 18:14
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Does anyone else have UPVC, or considered getting UPVC but discounted it? What are your thoughts about this product?

 

 

Yes - replaced wooden sash with UPVC we kept the existing outside timber frame - what surprises me is how well it blends in you don't really notice the windows have been replaced not to mention it saves 10% on the price as its an easier install they remove the old sash windows, and simply cut across any wooden beam that separates the sash from the non moving part of the window then insert the UPVC window in the gap - we didn't completely replace all windows yet probably 80% and they did it in one day which I was impressed with.

 

We went with VEKA Windows installed by homerit using some awning windows for the larger glass panes that we weren't going to leave open all day and used tilt and turn which I love in summer for quickly cleaning the windows and airing the house - they are so good that when we do the lounge (only area of the house not renovated) I will probably make them all tilt and turn.

 

Changing our windows is the best thing we've done during our renovations.  I don't get woken during stormy nights like before and the house stays warm and yet cool in summer because we've gone for the argon dual glazing with low-e.

 

 

 

 

 

 


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  Reply # 1631216 15-Sep-2016 18:59
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We have had our rotten wooden windows replaced this year with PVC, love them.

 

The only issue was the bathroom window becoming a lot smaller but we are used to it now.

 

We got ours from homerit in Auckland.

 

We replaced our doors as well and cant go passed tilt and turn. You can have some great fun with visitors, they dont expect it :-)

 

The only downside was going from a door sill to a door frame with a lip.

 

If anyone in Auckland wants to have a look PM me.

 

Regards

 

John

 

 

 

 





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  Reply # 1631223 15-Sep-2016 19:02
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There is no way I would have gone with their doors for the main doors. Put up with it for the bedroom upstairs because it was so exposed and wanted the good seal for windy nights.

 

Seems there is a huge lack of good sealing doors with a totally flat bottom part, so you can wheel things in and out without going over anything at all.





Richard rich.ms

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  Reply # 1631230 15-Sep-2016 19:14
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richms:

 

There is no way I would have gone with their doors for the main doors. Put up with it for the bedroom upstairs because it was so exposed and wanted the good seal for windy nights.

 

Seems there is a huge lack of good sealing doors with a totally flat bottom part, so you can wheel things in and out without going over anything at all.

 

 

That was a complete afterthought on our part, it was a last minute decision to replace the doors.

 

were in a high wind zone so the sealing the door was fantastic.

 

No more drafts and whistling on windy days.

 

John





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  Reply # 1631313 15-Sep-2016 20:49
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timmmay:

We had all our doors and windows replaced with uPVC, really happy with their appearance and thermal properties.Their acoustic insulation isn't as good as my thick old wooden windows, which had a second pane of 3mm PVC as retrofit double glazing. I think it's because it's only two pieces of PVC keeping noise out, there are spacers under the glass so it's just PVC, air, PVC behind the frames. If a company was really onto it they might be able to reduce the noise a bit, but ThermalFrame didn't.


I'd get them again for sure. Just be sure to maintain them. Thermalframe doesn't give maintenance instructions, and apparently you need to spray the metal bits with silicone every 3-6 months to prevent rust. I had one older window, 3 years I think, with a tiny bit of surface rust they eventually fixed up with light sanding.



Apart from washing them down every few months I wouldn't have thought windows like that would need any maintenance. Never had to do any to my aluminium ones in over 10 years not with any components or hinges. . Maybe you are in a coastal environment.?

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  Reply # 1631318 15-Sep-2016 20:55
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Nope, the ocean isn't anywhere near here. It's just the metal stays that support the window, they got a surface rust on them.





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  Reply # 1636255 20-Sep-2016 00:55
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We were keen as they were more like what my wife was used to.  Sales guy said they were same price at thermal broken double glazing, in the end that was wrong.  Our quote was 28k or something, theirs 35k.  Got quite snarky when we said we weren't going to get them.  Very unprofessional.


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  Reply # 1636261 20-Sep-2016 02:13
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Swanny:

 

We were keen as they were more like what my wife was used to.  Sales guy said they were same price at thermal broken double glazing, in the end that was wrong.  Our quote was 28k or something, theirs 35k.  Got quite snarky when we said we weren't going to get them.  Very unprofessional.

 

 

 

 

So PVC were a lot more than Aluminium Thermally broken? I was told by a window company selling aluminium windows, that going to Low E glass will provide a larger energy benefit for your dollar, than going for thermally broken windows. 


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  Reply # 1636282 20-Sep-2016 07:01
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@Swanny your message is imprecise, I'm not sure which number refers to which, who got snarky, etc





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