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Topic # 223203 19-Sep-2017 07:46
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We have a large section, the rear is square, but with landscaping, its a horsehoe shape with feet, I need a mowing strip, so seeking advice

 

1. Buy 6m lengthts of H4 rough sawn 100x50. Fit and peg them at soil level. From two I bought for a planter, they should bend enough. Will these last a good number of years? Can I extend the life by painting or staining first?

 

2. Lay 75mm of quickcrete with a No. 8 wire run midway for reinforcing, then mortar 25mm flat bricks or cobbles on top.

 

3. Get a company to run concrete edging. Any idea of cost per lineal metre?


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  Reply # 1868370 19-Sep-2017 08:44
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1) H4 timber edging should look good for a good 10-20 years. You'll need a lot of pegs to prevent it from bowing - I'd suggest every metre if you will spend a lot of time looking at it. But kind of a pain to mow against, as you'll need to finish off with weed eater.

 

 

 

For a 'mowing strip' you could just do your 75mm reinforced concrete, 100mm wide, and leave it at that. Chuck some colour powder in if you want it to look nice. 

 

 

 

Either way - use string line to check if lawn is actually flat, as dealing with contours needs to be planned in advance. Also expect to dig through a lot of tree roots. 


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  Reply # 1868372 19-Sep-2017 08:50
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The market average rate for a 100x200mm concrete mowing strip is around $20 per metre. Going for a smaller dimension won't reduce the cost much as the cost of digging and formwork stays pretty constant. 


 
 
 
 




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  Reply # 1868378 19-Sep-2017 08:59
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nickb800:

 

1) H4 timber edging should look good for a good 10-20 years. You'll need a lot of pegs to prevent it from bowing - I'd suggest every metre if you will spend a lot of time looking at it. But kind of a pain to mow against, as you'll need to finish off with weed eater.

 

 

 

For a 'mowing strip' you could just do your 75mm reinforced concrete, 100mm wide, and leave it at that. Chuck some colour powder in if you want it to look nice. 

 

 

 

Either way - use string line to check if lawn is actually flat, as dealing with contours needs to be planned in advance. Also expect to dig through a lot of tree roots. 

 

 

I planned to have the strip at soil level, so edge trimming might not be too bad, but I have an electric line trimmer so thats ok.

 

I thought I'd put pegs in every metre or so, and double screw them to help bowing. Screws can snap, but they wont pull out over time

 

Doing a rough as look from upstairs, maybe 40 metres, so say 50 that's $1000. That's not bad. Any one on ChCh that you are aware of?


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  Reply # 1868420 19-Sep-2017 10:04
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tdgeek:

 

nickb800:

 

1) H4 timber edging should look good for a good 10-20 years. You'll need a lot of pegs to prevent it from bowing - I'd suggest every metre if you will spend a lot of time looking at it. But kind of a pain to mow against, as you'll need to finish off with weed eater.

 

 

 

For a 'mowing strip' you could just do your 75mm reinforced concrete, 100mm wide, and leave it at that. Chuck some colour powder in if you want it to look nice. 

 

 

 

Either way - use string line to check if lawn is actually flat, as dealing with contours needs to be planned in advance. Also expect to dig through a lot of tree roots. 

 

 

I planned to have the strip at soil level, so edge trimming might not be too bad, but I have an electric line trimmer so thats ok.

 

I thought I'd put pegs in every metre or so, and double screw them to help bowing. Screws can snap, but they wont pull out over time

 

Doing a rough as look from upstairs, maybe 40 metres, so say 50 that's $1000. That's not bad. Any one on ChCh that you are aware of?

 

 

No sorry, that average is from a quantity surveyors resource, so I don't know any specific firms. Also ex-GST, and may be affected by access for machinery. 


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  Reply # 1868423 19-Sep-2017 10:11
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Beware of cheap concrete mow strip.  Often you see guys with a continuous kerbing machine and it's typically just cement with minimal aggregate and no steel reinforcing.  Chips easy, cracks if there is any subsidence.

 

If you are going with timber, then kerfing it will ensure it bends more easily and consistently.

 

 

 

 





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  Reply # 1868435 19-Sep-2017 10:24
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nickb800:

 

tdgeek:

 

nickb800:

 

1) H4 timber edging should look good for a good 10-20 years. You'll need a lot of pegs to prevent it from bowing - I'd suggest every metre if you will spend a lot of time looking at it. But kind of a pain to mow against, as you'll need to finish off with weed eater.

 

 

 

For a 'mowing strip' you could just do your 75mm reinforced concrete, 100mm wide, and leave it at that. Chuck some colour powder in if you want it to look nice. 

 

 

 

Either way - use string line to check if lawn is actually flat, as dealing with contours needs to be planned in advance. Also expect to dig through a lot of tree roots. 

 

 

I planned to have the strip at soil level, so edge trimming might not be too bad, but I have an electric line trimmer so thats ok.

 

I thought I'd put pegs in every metre or so, and double screw them to help bowing. Screws can snap, but they wont pull out over time

 

Doing a rough as look from upstairs, maybe 40 metres, so say 50 that's $1000. That's not bad. Any one on ChCh that you are aware of?

 

 

No sorry, that average is from a quantity surveyors resource, so I don't know any specific firms. Also ex-GST, and may be affected by access for machinery. 

 

 

Thanks Nick, I'm keen on the timber now. 10-20 years is plenty, that was the key worry




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  Reply # 1868439 19-Sep-2017 10:29
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MikeAqua:

 

Beware of cheap concrete mow strip.  Often you see guys with a continuous kerbing machine and it's typically just cement with minimal aggregate and no steel reinforcing.  Chips easy, cracks if there is any subsidence.

 

If you are going with timber, then kerfing it will ensure it bends more easily and consistently.

 

 

 

 

 

 

I am hoping it will bend far enough. If you imagine 6m on the ground, and being able to bend each end up maybe 900mm to give an arc

 

The timber yard is not far from me, I will do a real world bend test


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  Reply # 1868442 19-Sep-2017 10:33
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We used to have mowing strips and found them a pain as weeds still grow along them and we would end up having to use a weed eater with are the devils tool. We now just run a then line of weed spray holding the spray tip at ground level. This deals to it for a few months and I can do it myself.  





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  Reply # 1868456 19-Sep-2017 11:02
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I've never had much success with standard treated pine pegs holding anything under stress for any length of time. You might need to use either hardwood or steel pegs to hold the bends in it.

 

Your soil might make to a difference to this too. Something hard (clay) will hold better, but you will have the devil's own task getting pine pegs in without them breaking.  




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  Reply # 1868473 19-Sep-2017 11:43
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mdf:

 

I've never had much success with standard treated pine pegs holding anything under stress for any length of time. You might need to use either hardwood or steel pegs to hold the bends in it.

 

Your soil might make to a difference to this too. Something hard (clay) will hold better, but you will have the devil's own task getting pine pegs in without them breaking.  

 

 

Yes. Its clay at about 300mm down, topsoil on top. The only stress is at the edges as the timber will be bent, the ends will want to spring out. The middle wlil want to spring in so thats ok. So I thought I'd mark the ends, dig a hole and pop a peg in, and quickcrete that. I could also use the 4x2 for those, and have the 2" end against the timber for more strength, and 45 degree saw that afterwards to reduce the visual look. 


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  Reply # 1868479 19-Sep-2017 11:48
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Yeah could be better using 0.5+ meter warratahs, that way you can smash then hard into the clay and they won't move. 


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  Reply # 1868494 19-Sep-2017 12:17
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^^ What Nick said. Way easier to pound something steel in than dig a hole and concrete. I've been known to use the cheap cut-offs of rebar from Bunnings for this, but a waratah will look better.


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  Reply # 1869035 20-Sep-2017 09:31
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I've had average results with timber for garden edging. It is damp underneath and dry on top so warps upwards in-plane. Pegs just pull out of the ground.

 

Just box up and pour a concrete kerb - piece of cake. Saw-cut it at regular intervals so it doesn't crack up.

 

 


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  Reply # 1869770 20-Sep-2017 20:35
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nickb800:

 

The market average rate for a 100x200mm concrete mowing strip is around $20 per metre. Going for a smaller dimension won't reduce the cost much as the cost of digging and formwork stays pretty constant. 

 

 

I think that's not going to work out too well for a domestic job of say 50m and expectation it'll only cost $1k.

 

I'd suggest that for about that (50M) then cost would be at least double that.

 

OTOH if you had a trailer, a small concrete mixer, and some timber to use for boxing, you'd be able to DIY for about $4 / metre (& sweat). 




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  Reply # 1869900 21-Sep-2017 07:15
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Fred99:

 

nickb800:

 

The market average rate for a 100x200mm concrete mowing strip is around $20 per metre. Going for a smaller dimension won't reduce the cost much as the cost of digging and formwork stays pretty constant. 

 

 

I think that's not going to work out too well for a domestic job of say 50m and expectation it'll only cost $1k.

 

I'd suggest that for about that (50M) then cost would be at least double that.

 

OTOH if you had a trailer, a small concrete mixer, and some timber to use for boxing, you'd be able to DIY for about $4 / metre (& sweat). 

 

 

Ive got a trailer, can hire a mixer or manually in wheelbarrow, but my concern is my finish. Extruded looks great but no reinforcing. I woudn't trust my own finish nor the sharpe edges, even with those edge tools.

 

Im now thinking to trench myself and use quickcrete for a 75mm reinforced base. Then mortar 200mm x 100mm x 40mm pavers on. $1-20 each, so per metre that as cheap as the timber, plus quickcrete.


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