Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.




135 posts

Master Geek


#232017 26-Mar-2018 08:14
Send private message

Hi

 

I am looking to prepare the front yard to be landscaped , the end finish is with white stones ideally instead of planting grass

 

Currently the ground is clay

 

What is the best way to stablise the clay in preparation for the white stones ?

 

 

 

Thanks

 

 

 

 


Filter this topic showing only the reply marked as answer View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
 1 | 2
2523 posts

Uber Geek

Lifetime subscriber

  #1983137 26-Mar-2018 08:33
Send private message

Why do you need to stabilise it - clay won't move.

 

I suggest you'd want to put a barrier between the clay and the stones though... maybe a permeable mat to prevent clay silt and weeds coming up through the stones.


3377 posts

Uber Geek

Subscriber

  #1983139 26-Mar-2018 08:40
Send private message

You'll probably need less white stone if you compact cheap metal as you would if preparing for concrete or tar sealing. Assume that any any potential water problems have been dealt with.

 
 
 
 




135 posts

Master Geek


  #1983147 26-Mar-2018 08:54
Send private message

Currently clay area gets sloppy when it rains 

 

The area is roughly 7m x 7m

 

The rain water does not stand as the is a small slope for water run off to the road drain

 

 

 

My fear of dropping white stones straight onto the clay , would the white stones start to sink into the clay when you walking on the stones ?

 

 

 

I was thinking of compacting the metal onto the clay then fill the white stones on top, what grade metal ? GAP20 or GAP40 or....

 

 

 

If I wanted to drive the car on the white stones on the odd occasion , what would be the best approach for the clay preparation ?

 

 

 

Should Geotexile be used ?


4512 posts

Uber Geek

Lifetime subscriber

  #1983149 26-Mar-2018 08:57
Send private message

As above. Clay is massively affected by water, particularly if you are on sloping ground. We made the mistake of insufficient drainage with a driveway, which was eventually undermined.




Areas of Geek interest: Home Theatre, HTPC, Android Tablets & Phones, iProducts.

16230 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

  #1983159 26-Mar-2018 09:12
Send private message

I would (have on my lawn) dig trenches, fill with that stone stuff that's maybe 1cm chunks and drainage coil. I put topsoil on top. It went from being a pond in winter to being a nicely draining lawn.

 

For tiling, that's interesting, I'd ask a professional. I might put in drainage then concrete it before tiles, or at least put in that stone stuff.


1595 posts

Uber Geek


  #1983180 26-Mar-2018 09:23
Send private message

Hi. Geotech Engineer here. Without a site appraisal your approach is sounding ok, you should put down a layer of geotextile under the Aggregate. Something like a layer of bidim cloth, followed by a 150mm compacted GAP 40 then your white stones.

mdf

2629 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

  #1983182 26-Mar-2018 09:25
Send private message

We ended up concreting, but I looked into this a while back. Sort our your drainage issues first, either with metal-filled trenches (don't use standard builder's mix; the sand will just wash away) or with permeable pipe. You'd then need to level it out, ideally using coarser then finer grades of metal and a plate compactor. This will also help the drainage further. If you're using stones and especially if you might end up driving on them, a permeable hex mat will lock everything in place nicely.

 

Something like this (stocked at Bunnings, I believe): http://www.naturalpaving.co.nz/ There is a youtube video of a two tonne truck driving on this stuff.

 

All of that is pretty much why we ended up concreting.


 
 
 
 




135 posts

Master Geek


  #1983225 26-Mar-2018 10:23
Send private message

1eStar: Hi. Geotech Engineer here. Without a site appraisal your approach is sounding ok, you should put down a layer of geotextile under the Aggregate. Something like a layer of bidim cloth, followed by a 150mm compacted GAP 40 then your white stones.

 

 

 

Thanks 1eStar , When you say bidim cloth  , would something like this work ? https://www.bunnings.co.nz/cirtex-3-9-x-5m-suretex-geotextile-pack_p00234054




135 posts

Master Geek


  #1983228 26-Mar-2018 10:33
Send private message

mdf:

 

We ended up concreting, but I looked into this a while back. Sort our your drainage issues first, either with metal-filled trenches (don't use standard builder's mix; the sand will just wash away) or with permeable pipe. You'd then need to level it out, ideally using coarser then finer grades of metal and a plate compactor. This will also help the drainage further. If you're using stones and especially if you might end up driving on them, a permeable hex mat will lock everything in place nicely.

 

Something like this (stocked at Bunnings, I believe): http://www.naturalpaving.co.nz/ There is a youtube video of a two tonne truck driving on this stuff.

 

All of that is pretty much why we ended up concreting.

 

 

 

 

Wow MDF, that looks like a nice product to finish it off :)




135 posts

Master Geek


  #1983312 26-Mar-2018 11:23
Send private message

1eStar: Hi. Geotech Engineer here. Without a site appraisal your approach is sounding ok, you should put down a layer of geotextile under the Aggregate. Something like a layer of bidim cloth, followed by a 150mm compacted GAP 40 then your white stones.

 

 

 

Something this maybe ? 

 

https://www.advancelandscape.co.nz/shop/Erosion+Control+Systems/Bidim+Geotextile.html


neb

2624 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  #1983369 26-Mar-2018 12:00
Send private message

If he's going to be driving on it, what about a pebble stabilising mat over 25/7 scoria? I've got paving stones laid over a massive bed of 25/7 (on top of an infinite depth of yellow clay) and it hasn't moved a millimetre no matter what the amount of rain.

 

 

In any case I'd go for the stabilising mat if you're going to be driving over it.

5849 posts

Uber Geek


  #1983496 26-Mar-2018 14:39
Send private message

mdf:

 

Sort our your drainage issues first, either with metal-filled trenches (don't use standard builder's mix; the sand will just wash away) or with permeable pipe.

 

 

If using permeable pipe consider trenches filled with coarse gravel, and/or the pipe you can buy with a textile cover.

 

Clay is a sealed to drain. As water doesn't move through it very well, the drainage needs to be more closely spaced.

 

 





Mike

1595 posts

Uber Geek


  #1983560 26-Mar-2018 15:29
Send private message

Yeah any of those nonwoven cloths will do. As others have said, get your drainage sorted first. The fabric separation provides some strength, but ultimately the thicker you make your aggregagate the stronger it is and the more load it will take without deformation.
I was walking this morning on an area of that naturalpave plastic reinforcement. It appears to have been placed directly on clay, has only experienced foot traffic and has failed dramatically.

neb

2624 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  #1983571 26-Mar-2018 15:49
Send private message

1eStar: Yeah any of those nonwoven cloths will do. As others have said, get your drainage sorted first. The fabric separation provides some strength, but ultimately the thicker you make your aggregagate the stronger it is and the more load it will take without deformation.

 

 

Another thing you can do, provided you don't plan to remove the whole lot again in the future, is to put down a base of the aggregate of your choice, run a plate compactor over it, and then lightly dust it with cement before it rains (or sprinkle it with a hose). That'll give you a pretty solid base to lay your drainage fill over, not actual concrete but more substantial than just compacted aggregate. That's how the steps down my garden were done, along with support piles concreted down to the earth's core, and the whole lot hasn't moved despite flooding amounts of rain.



135 posts

Master Geek


  #1983968 27-Mar-2018 08:17
Send private message

Thanks Team :)

 

 

 

Liking the idea/look of the naturalpave plastic 

 

It seems that I will be needing to prep the ground the same if I were to go with white stones for the end result or if I were to end up with naturalpave plastic 

 

Ground prep:

 

Dig trenchs

 

Fill trenchs with scoria and drain coil

 

Lay geotech fabric (bidim cloth) over work area

 

Build a huge box around work area

 

Fill huge box with GAP20 and compact over geotech fabric (bidim cloth) 


 1 | 2
Filter this topic showing only the reply marked as answer View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic




News »

Pre-orders for Huawei MateBook 13 open now
Posted 14-Aug-2020 14:26


Freeview On Demand app launches on Sony Android TVs
Posted 6-Aug-2020 13:35


UFB hits more than one million connections
Posted 6-Aug-2020 09:42


D-Link A/NZ extends COVR Wi-Fi EasyMesh System series with new three-pack
Posted 4-Aug-2020 15:01


New Zealand software Rfider tracks coffee from Colombia all the way to New Zealand businesses
Posted 3-Aug-2020 10:35


Logitech G launches Pro X Wireless gaming headset
Posted 3-Aug-2020 10:21


Sony Alpha 7S III provides supreme imaging performance
Posted 3-Aug-2020 10:11


Sony introduces first CFexpress Type A memory card
Posted 3-Aug-2020 10:05


Marsello acquires Goody consolidating online and in-store marketing position
Posted 30-Jul-2020 16:26


Fonterra first major customer for Microsoft's New Zealand datacentre
Posted 30-Jul-2020 08:07


Everything we learnt at the IBM Cloud Forum 2020
Posted 29-Jul-2020 14:45


Dropbox launches native HelloSign workflow and data residency in Australia
Posted 29-Jul-2020 12:48


Spark launches 5G in Palmerston North
Posted 29-Jul-2020 09:50


Lenovo brings speed and smarter features to new 5G mobile gaming phone
Posted 28-Jul-2020 22:00


Withings raises $60 million to enable bridge between patients and healthcare
Posted 28-Jul-2020 21:51



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.


Support Geekzone »

Our community of supporters help make Geekzone possible. Click the button below to join them.

Support Geezone on PressPatron



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.