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Topic # 239461 19-Jul-2018 12:49
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Hi Geekzone, 

 

What are some innovative and cheaper ways to insulate an older house - wooden frame windows without insulation?

 

I'm aware of a few like plastic window covering as poor-mans double glazing and using rubber seals on windows.

 

Any other ways I can help reduce the power bill and keep warm?

 

Thanks for your help!

 

 


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  Reply # 2058812 19-Jul-2018 13:01
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Have you looked at the many other Geekzone forum threads about insulation?

 

Have you looked at the many good online resources like Energywise?


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  Reply # 2058822 19-Jul-2018 13:07
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First fix and drafts, including replacing downlights that aren't sealed and rated for insulation cover.

 

Next insulate the ceiling with at least the minimum spec, ideally more. I put in two layers of pink batts. Ceiling is the most effective insulation, and it's not that expensive.

 

Wall and under-floor insulation helps a bit. Double glazing can help by reducing drafts and heat loss, but it's more of a "final step" IMHO rather than something to do up front. The thin "glad wrap" type plastic isn't that effective and can make a mess of your windows. I had 3mm thick plastic sheets added inside the glass, that was about $4K and almost as effective as proper double glazing - but ugly.





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  Reply # 2058826 19-Jul-2018 13:33
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Hammerer:

 

Have you looked at the many other Geekzone forum threads about insulation?

 

Have you looked at the many good online resources like Energywise?

 

 

We're renting, so trying to avoid spending more than a hundred or two because it's not ours.


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  Reply # 2058852 19-Jul-2018 13:52
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If you are renting, your landlord has to insulate the place.

 

Doesn't have to Double-Glaze, but does have to insulate ceiling and walls.

 

If that is done, then you should look at where air can escape or get in and try to prevent that. Downlights are bad, gaps under doors and around windows also.


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  Reply # 2058875 19-Jul-2018 14:52
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trig42:

 

If you are renting, your landlord has to insulate the place.

 

Doesn't have to Double-Glaze, but does have to insulate ceiling and walls.

 

If that is done, then you should look at where air can escape or get in and try to prevent that. Downlights are bad, gaps under doors and around windows also.

 

 

Not quite correct - Landlords must currently provide insulation statements indicating what level of insulation (if any) is present in a rental property (floor, ceiling, walls).

 

By July 2019, landlords must also ensure that ceiling and underfloor insulation meets the new minimum standards that will apply from that date (unless not practical due to access issues etc)

 

There is not now - nor is there planned to be - any obligation for a rental property to have wall insulation.


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  Reply # 2058905 19-Jul-2018 15:53
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Wheelbarrow01:

 

There is not now - nor is there planned to be - any obligation for a rental property to have wall insulation.

 

 

And that's a tricky enough proposition for owner-occupied older homes! The price of retrofitting wall insulation is substantial if done properly - as much as I'd love to do this, the cost of removing wall linings, insulating the walls, putting in new gib, and painting the walls would be exorbitant in our 1920s house (3m stud through most of it).

 

Of course, there are other options like foam being pumped into the walls, but there are questions over the efficacy of many of these techniques (we had our last house done, and can't say I noticed a significant difference!). 


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  Reply # 2058907 19-Jul-2018 15:57
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Wheelbarrow01:

 

There is not now - nor is there planned to be - any obligation for a rental property to have wall insulation.

 

 

Ah, my bad then, sorry. I thought it was walls and ceilings, not floors and ceilings.

 

 


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  Reply # 2059081 19-Jul-2018 22:29
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trig42:

Wheelbarrow01:


There is not now - nor is there planned to be - any obligation for a rental property to have wall insulation.



Ah, my bad then, sorry. I thought it was walls and ceilings, not floors and ceilings.


 



Also the landlord only has to insulate the roof and floor where it is reasonably practicable to do so. Flat roof houses / skillion roof houses, concrete floor slab on ground etc don't have to be insulated. But landlords will have to provide insulation statements. So at least you will know before renting a house wether it has roof or floor insulation or not.

Also insulation not required where there is another occupancy above or below.





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  Reply # 2059126 20-Jul-2018 07:22
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Seal draughts and good curtains.

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  Reply # 2059128 20-Jul-2018 07:25
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If there aren't good curtains on all the windows try asking the landlord to fund getting them. If no luck with that there are 'curtain banks' that provide curtains (try your local Citizens advice Bureau CAB) for contact details.

 

If there is a wood burner in place but needs some maintenance , ask the landlord.

 

Ask the landlord about getting a heat pump or two. They dont need to provide one, and may says 'sure , but the rent will go up by $x' , but at least you can decide if the extra cost is worth it to you.


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  Reply # 2059131 20-Jul-2018 07:46
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kryptonjohn: Seal draughts and good curtains.

 

In an older rented house, thats the best advice. Carpet snakes are a help. Cold air wont wander through gaps, it will rush in to equalise the temperature 

 

Open curtains for sun where you can, shut them when you can.


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  Reply # 2059132 20-Jul-2018 07:59
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jonathan18:

 

Wheelbarrow01:

 

There is not now - nor is there planned to be - any obligation for a rental property to have wall insulation.

 

 

And that's a tricky enough proposition for owner-occupied older homes! The price of retrofitting wall insulation is substantial if done properly - as much as I'd love to do this, the cost of removing wall linings, insulating the walls, putting in new gib, and painting the walls would be exorbitant in our 1920s house (3m stud through most of it).

 

Of course, there are other options like foam being pumped into the walls, but there are questions over the efficacy of many of these techniques (we had our last house done, and can't say I noticed a significant difference!). 

 

 

Yes I heard nothing but negative stuff about pumped foam insulation - massive shrinkage resulting in gaps mostly. In October last year I had dry blown insulation installed in the wall cavities of my 1960's brick veneer house. The product I chose is water retardant, won't wick, and breathes very well, so there was no requirement to have lining paper or a void between the framing and cladding, and it has council consent. It's also blown in under pressure so it's tightly packed which means it won't settle over time. They used an infrared heat gun to check that every last corner was filled up.

 

It cost me about $4500 for my 120m2 house and it has made a massive difference to heat retention.The house used to lose heat at a phenomenal rate, even though my floor and ceiling are both well insulated. Basically if I let the fire die down the house would be freezing again within an hour. Now it's still warm in the morning when I let the fire burn out at 9pm. It's not an exaggeration to say it's changed my life, especially in Christchurch at this time of year - I am having a MUCH more comfortable winter compared to last year.

 

www.insulmax.co.nz


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  Reply # 2059145 20-Jul-2018 08:09
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How did they manage with the dwangs? Drill the gap between veneer bricks, fill, and seal so not visible?


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  Reply # 2059161 20-Jul-2018 08:38
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It was extremely high-tech. The guy started at the corner of the house, drilled the first hole (into the mortar between bricks), then used a piece of wire to probe and thus determine where the next stud and dwang is . Rinse and repeat. At the end of the process, he checked his work with the infrared temperature gun, filled the holes with mortar, then painted over the mortar (my whole house is painted white). You need a pretty expert eye to see any evidence of installation.

 

The temperature gun was very interesting to play with. I had it trained on the gib inside the house as he was filling the cavities up. I could actually see the gib gradually change colour as he filled the wall. Over the course of 10-15 minutes or so, the heat signature of the gib would go from a dark purple to a more red/orange colour. The voids started out darker than the timber framing, and at the end, the framing was far darker than the insulated voids.


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  Reply # 2059170 20-Jul-2018 08:43
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Sounds like a 10/10 job to me!


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