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D.W

D.W

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#249449 11-May-2019 11:55
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I'm going to remove a hard-wired smoke alarm in my house, just wanting to know what best approach is to deal with the leftover wiring in my ceiling space. What should I be doing to the end of the wiring?


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Bung
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  #2234929 11-May-2019 12:01
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Is it the wiring linking the alarms or the wiring powering them?

D.W

D.W

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  #2234931 11-May-2019 12:07
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Powering.

sqishy
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  #2234932 11-May-2019 12:11
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Any view on what voltage is on the alarm, where its powered from or others using this power. There are several ways to terminate/insulate the ends. But we need more info. Will the wire still have power post removal?




  #2234935 11-May-2019 12:31
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Terminate in a small junction box.





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chevrolux
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  #2234936 11-May-2019 12:31
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Just disconnect the other end to insure no power on it. Pull the cable out if you feel like, but if it's just a completely dead cable, no issues.


D.W

D.W

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  #2236375 14-May-2019 09:13
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sqishy:

 

Any view on what voltage is on the alarm, where its powered from or others using this power. There are several ways to terminate/insulate the ends. But we need more info. Will the wire still have power post removal?

 

 

Sorry took a while to respond to this one, yes it will still have power. I tried tracing the power cable in the hope of disconnecting at the other end, but its in the ceiling of the upper floor of a two storey house and leads to a hole with other cables which then run down to the bottom floor inside the walls, so I lose track of which wire it is.

 

Smoke alarm is 240V, https://www.psaproducts.com.au/products/ionisation-with-9v-battery-backup-lif5000-aspx/


robfish
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  #2236479 14-May-2019 09:54
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Answering the title of this thread - the safe way is to use an electrician.





Rob



Kickinbac
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  #2240005 17-May-2019 16:52
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Sorry, dumb question but why are you removing the smoke alarm?  How about installing a new wired smoke alarm? Then you will have safe wiring and new smoke alarm.

 

Otherwise, your power supply to the smoke detector could be from a lighting circuit on the loop between the switches. You could find this out by turning off circuit breakers until you find the circuit it's fed off.  But obviously, you need to know what you're doing to test safely. If in doubt get an electrician in.   

 

 


D.W

D.W

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  #2240415 18-May-2019 11:14
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Kickinbac:

 

Sorry, dumb question but why are you removing the smoke alarm?  How about installing a new wired smoke alarm? Then you will have safe wiring and new smoke alarm.

 

Otherwise, your power supply to the smoke detector could be from a lighting circuit on the loop between the switches. You could find this out by turning off circuit breakers until you find the circuit it's fed off.  But obviously, you need to know what you're doing to test safely. If in doubt get an electrician in.   

 

 

It was an older ionisation smoke alarm with battery backup, the battery needed replacing but the smoke alarm was misplaced while it was waiting for the replacement battery to be installed. It was mounted with a base that is hard-wired. 

 

Given it's location it appears to be recommended to install photoelectric smoke alarms instead, and I already have a couple of spare long-life battery photoelectric units from when I installed them throughout the rest of the house, so rather than buy another hard-wired photoelectric unit I'd rather just install one of the devices I already have on hand. 

 

The intention was to then use that spot in the ceiling to install a Wireless AP (its in our hallway, and right where I want another AP).


Kickinbac
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  #2240420 18-May-2019 11:47
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D.W:

Kickinbac:


Sorry, dumb question but why are you removing the smoke alarm?  How about installing a new wired smoke alarm? Then you will have safe wiring and new smoke alarm.


Otherwise, your power supply to the smoke detector could be from a lighting circuit on the loop between the switches. You could find this out by turning off circuit breakers until you find the circuit it's fed off.  But obviously, you need to know what you're doing to test safely. If in doubt get an electrician in.   



It was an older ionisation smoke alarm with battery backup, the battery needed replacing but the smoke alarm was misplaced while it was waiting for the replacement battery to be installed. It was mounted with a base that is hard-wired. 


Given it's location it appears to be recommended to install photoelectric smoke alarms instead, and I already have a couple of spare long-life battery photoelectric units from when I installed them throughout the rest of the house, so rather than buy another hard-wired photoelectric unit I'd rather just install one of the devices I already have on hand. 


The intention was to then use that spot in the ceiling to install a Wireless AP (its in our hallway, and right where I want another AP).



OK, how about just installing a power point in the roof. Like this:



Or a standard power point on a mounting block.

You can then use it for an AP or it’s safe if you are not using it. Could always use it to plug in a lamp if you ever work in the ceiling.

sqishy
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  #2240422 18-May-2019 11:54
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Can terminate in ceiling with this until you decide what to do:

 

 

 

https://www.tradedepot.co.nz/tdx-junction-box-small

 

 

 

https://www.bunnings.co.nz/deta-junction-box_p00310361

 

 


FineWine
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  #2240589 18-May-2019 16:33
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I have used these before from Bunnings: DETA Screw Connector 40amp - 8 Pack





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larknz
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  #2240622 18-May-2019 17:42
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Don't install a plug socket unless you know the cable is the correct size and is not connected to a lighting circuit. If you want to repurpose the cable you need to know wire size and where it is connected.

PhantomNVD
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  #2240641 18-May-2019 20:14
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larknz: Don't install a plug socket unless you know the cable is the correct size and is not connected to a lighting circuit. If you want to repurpose the cable you need to know wire size and where it is connected.


And that’s exactly why you need an electrician for this job too.

DIY work on 240v is strictly like for like swapping and old fuse wire replacement by law, and for good reason)

Kickinbac
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  #2240648 18-May-2019 20:35
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PhantomNVD:
larknz: Don't install a plug socket unless you know the cable is the correct size and is not connected to a lighting circuit. If you want to repurpose the cable you need to know wire size and where it is connected.


And that’s exactly why you need an electrician for this job too.

DIY work on 240v is strictly like for like swapping and old fuse wire replacement by law, and for good reason)


You can do electrical work on your own property if you follow the rules and regulations.
https://worksafe.govt.nz/managing-health-and-safety/consumers/safe-living-with-electricity/getting-electrical-work-done/doing-your-own-electrical-work/

The lighting circuits in my house all have power points, as per picture I postd above, led lights are plugged into them.


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