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656 posts

Ultimate Geek
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# 249498 13-May-2019 21:04
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So after weeks of searching I have up on buying a tv cabinet to fit all av gear, and decided to build one.

For some reason (I'm a novice)I decided to attempt mitre corners (with circular saw). After cutting, the corners don't fit flush. Using a file and sanding hasn't helped much either.

I'm just wondering if I should buy a mitre saw or table saw to re cut them?

The pieces are 1500 x 450. Sides 500 x 450.

I was thinking mitre saw (make 2 cuts) as the ends have been compromised in straightness, where as the length is still straight and true.

Or maybe I should just cut it straight, much easier.... Lol

Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
Cheers

PS does any of the above make sense? Sorry if not

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EMB

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  # 2236297 13-May-2019 21:08
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Don't trust the inclination scale on the saw.  Set it by cutting a piece of scrap at the supposed 45 degrees, then flip one piece over and lay it against the other on a flat surface - if they match you have an accurate 45 degrees; if not, adjust, rinse and repeat until they do.  Then recut the bits that matter.


mdf

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  # 2236301 13-May-2019 21:18
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William Ng has you covered:

 


 
 
 
 


mdf

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  # 2236304 13-May-2019 21:20
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If it's too bad for this approach, don't buy a mitre/cross cut saw for this, it's not what they are designed for. Table saw is best, but a track for your circular saw, or a track/plunge saw will also do the job. But as @EMB says, you will still need to test everything on scrap first to check it lines up.

 

A new saw (esp a table saw) is a bit of an investment for a one-off job though?


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Master Geek
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  # 2236305 13-May-2019 21:27
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Using a circular saw is very hard for this, suggest you straight cut. Maybe make the top and bottom bigger and have then indent the sides.


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Ultimate Geek
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  # 2236327 13-May-2019 22:14
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Straight cuts would be simplest, and rather than buying a tablesaw for a one-off job, just get a cutting guide like this one that you can clamp to your wood so that your circular saw goes exactly where you mean it to. 


neb

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  # 2236335 13-May-2019 22:38
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33coupe: So after weeks of searching I have up on buying a tv cabinet to fit all av gear, and decided to build one.

For some reason (I'm a novice)I decided to attempt mitre corners (with circular saw). After cutting, the corners don't fit flush. Using a file and sanding hasn't helped much either.

I'm just wondering if I should buy a mitre saw or table saw to re cut them?

 

 

The other replies have already said most of what's to be said, but apart from that could you post a sketch of what you're trying to build? It sounds like a square/cube-shape rather than a table-shape (top a bit larger than the sides) since you're concerned about doing mitred corners. If you're a novice then a more traditional table-style one would be easier, just get a solid top, you can get a thinner top and put trim around the edges to make it look thicker but then you're back to the mitred-join problem again, then attach the sides and bottom with dowelled butt joints. This avoids any mitred joins.

neb

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  # 2236336 13-May-2019 22:41
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mdf:

A new saw (esp a table saw) is a bit of an investment for a one-off job though?

 

 

It depends if 33coupe is single or not. "I need to buy $thing_I_want in order to do $thing_spouse_wants" is always a good investment.

 
 
 
 


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  # 2236342 14-May-2019 00:37
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Forget about the mitre saw as the width is to long.  You're looking at either a table saw or a circular saw.

 

A table saw is by far the easiest option if you've got access to one, but it's not impossible with the circular saw. 

 

The issues with using the circular saw are getting the angle exact and ensuring the cut is square {assuming the long sides are parallel already).

 

To get the angle exact either use E'MB's method or buy an angle finder like this.

 

To be able to cut a square/straight line freehand simply requires practice practice practice.  For more consistent results, get circular saw guide/track (and still practice!}.

 

Woodworking can be fun and relatively easy as long as you've got a bit of patience and planning ability.  It's also a great reason to get new toys and the feeling when a project goes right is pretty satisfying.

 

Good luck!


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  # 2236345 14-May-2019 06:34
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Sometimes the drawback of circular saws is the amount of flex you can get between blade and sole plate. You can reduce this by using a sharp blade and letting it cut with only light pressure on the saw handle. On my Makita I drop the blade right down and wedge the gap between motor and base at the rear opposite the height adjustment stay.

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  # 2236438 14-May-2019 09:50
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Slightly on topic ... if you want to join two bits of wood together for furniture get one of these :

 

https://www.bunnings.co.nz/ozito-1010w-corded-biscuit-joiner_p00309936

 

 

 

Most wonderful tool ever :)




656 posts

Ultimate Geek
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  # 2247368 28-May-2019 20:43
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Sorry for the delay, its been pretty full on. Thanks for the replies its massively appreciated.

 

After much consideration I ended up buying a table saw (it wont be the last time I use it). I recut all the pieces, and even though it was better than my first attempt it still had gaps and poor joins (after more cuts I think I know why now, live and learn...).

 

So on my last attempt I cut all of the pieces straight / square. It now looks like a generic one from the shop, but I just need it done now (miss my speakers way too much, plus Ive got an inspection coming up lol)

 

 

 

Ideally I want to fit doors like I did on my last one (but that can wait). Can I ask how you would make / add them, as the front is flush? 

 

 

 

I will need to add a back panel to hide the cables, I have a piece of fibreboard, but just trying to think of a way to attach it.

 

I can only think of screwing it into the wood. Can anyone think of any other way? 

 

 

 

Thanks again

 

 

 

 

 

 




656 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 39


  # 2247369 28-May-2019 20:43
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Sorry for the delay, its been pretty full on. Thanks for the replies its massively appreciated.

 

After much consideration I ended up buying a table saw (it wont be the last time I use it). I recut all the pieces, and even though it was better than my first attempt it still had gaps and poor joins (after more cuts I think I know why now, live and learn...).

 

So on my last attempt I cut all of the pieces straight / square. It now looks like a generic one from the shop, but I just need it done now (miss my speakers way too much, plus Ive got an inspection coming up lol)

 

 

 

Ideally I want to fit doors like I did on my last one (but that can wait). Can I ask how you would make / add them, as the front is flush? 

 

 

 

I will need to add a back panel to hide the cables, I have a piece of fibreboard, but just trying to think of a way to attach it.

 

I can only think of screwing it into the wood. Can anyone think of any other way? 

 

 

 

Thanks again

 

 

 

 

 

 




656 posts

Ultimate Geek
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  # 2247371 28-May-2019 20:55
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New build

 

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1GIPi21KGSPdcJ7EIx3nQAbgHDKqlRuNT

 

 

 

Old one:

 

Click to see full size

 

 

 

not sure if the link works?

 

 

 

 


mdf

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  # 2247372 28-May-2019 20:56
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Nice work.

 

For doors/hinges, the kitchen style overlay hinges are likely your best bet. The various types are kinda hard to figure out in abstract (full overlay? half overlay?). Bunnings stocks Hafele hinges and in my Bunnings at least has some set up on a demo case so you can figure out how they work.

 

For a backing board, you can either cut grooves (using your new table saw) and slide it in, or screw, glue or nail. I tend to cut a rebate so the sides finish flush at the back, then glue and pin in back panels.




656 posts

Ultimate Geek
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  # 2249391 31-May-2019 23:07
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Thanks for the suggestions, I'll check them out.

I spent quite a lot of time in mitre10 (and elsewhere) trying to figure out the back panel.
I ended up buying 2 hinges, and one small door lock. But was concerned about screwing through 3mm board.

4am I wake up and remembered I could use adhesive magnets. Much easier solution lol.
Have to get it finished this weekend, house inspection coming up! Lol

Thanks again

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