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438 posts

Ultimate Geek


Topic # 62378 5-Jun-2010 14:06
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Hi there I have a oil heater that died last night and yep is been cold so i want to fix it today i think it may be the fuse so i will try that first, I have a shop around the corner open on sat that sells parts. but i can't figure it out where the fuse is I opened the front and only see cables  "does anyone here know how the oil heater fuse look like?'

Thank you,



Andy

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  Reply # 338561 5-Jun-2010 16:29
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Could be a couple of things, one being the thermostat itself has died - it's usually a bi-metallic strip of metal that expands and contracts according to temperature. Usually the contacts wear out.
Secondly, it could be the thermal fuse, and or tilt-switch. Thermal fuse goes open circuit if it gets too hot. If you cover the heating fins to dry stuff on, then the heater gets too hot, and opens the thermal fuse.
Tilt switch - opens circuit if heater is tilted.
Could also be the element.

I've had a few oil heaters over the years, and none have really died. They just fade away, wheels fall off, get handed down to kids, etc.





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  Reply # 338563 5-Jun-2010 16:36
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As an additional note, do be very careful if you are unsure of what you are doing, or haven't had any experience woking on mains rated appliances. They are built down to a price with little margin for error in terms of safety.
You should at least know how to use a multimeter to check for open circuits, etc, and checking voltages at various terminals. With one hand behind your back :-)

I should have mentioned that many of the failures in heating appliances are due to bad connections between the wiring and any device within the applicance that has heat applied to it - it tends to corrode and loosen any connections - so look for evidence of sparking, discolouration, etc.






My thoughts are no longer my own and is probably representative of our media-controlled government




438 posts

Ultimate Geek


  Reply # 338568 5-Jun-2010 17:02
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Thank you so much i found your information very helpfull,

Yes this was my first time fixing a oil heater... and success it is fixed

I check for all the things you told me and find the fuse gone bad... then run to shop around the corner and replaced the fuse and all good now.

thank you so much,


Andy 

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