Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.




1019 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 19


# 251354 20-Jun-2019 20:21
Send private message quote this post

Hi All,

 

I'm looking at replacing an electronic in-ear thermometer we got when our daughter was born with a non-contact infrared model that can ideally measure both forehead and in-ears temps (in Celcius). 

 

Every model I've found so far pretty much has equally-split reviews for being great or terribly inaccurate, so was wondering if anyone has any make/model recommendations?  Or are the reviews down to the tech being pretty limited/unreliable?  Given it's for a child's temperature, I'd really like it to be accurate.


Create new topic
3834 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1059


  # 2261698 20-Jun-2019 21:52
Send private message quote this post

Is there a particular reason why you want an infrared model? Given that many consumer models are pretty ‘flexible” with their readings, perhaps it’s worth with sticking with a more tried and true tech?

The infrared model we bought from Amazon had decent enough reviews, but I’ve not been too impressed with its accuracy. But at least it can read out the temperature in Spanish as well as English!

If you are really keen on an infrared thermometer, see if you can find some recommendations from medical professionals. Interestingly, though, my FIL, who’s a doctor, still uses a Braun in-ear model.

2024 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 779

Lifetime subscriber

  # 2261703 20-Jun-2019 22:11
3 people support this post
Send private message quote this post

Skin temperature readings vary significantly depending on the amount of vasoconstriction of the blood supply to the skin. If the room is cold then the skin cools as blood is shunted away from the skin to reduce temperature loss but then they no longer reflect core temperatures. The most accurate skin sensors have warming coils build into them which warm slightly to try to reduce the vasoconstriction caused by a cool room.

 

 

 

Inner ear thermometers have the theoretical advantage of measuring the temperature of the ear drum/tympanic membrane which has a high blood flow to volume ratio and will change temperature relatively quickly to reflect core temperature. Ideally the temperature of the ear drum is measure by placing of a sensor against the ear drum which isn't pleasant but is a validated research method of measuring core temperatures. The IR ear thermometers are trying to measure the IR radiation of the ear drum but they have potential issues of ear wax or positioning issues interfering with this.

 

 

 

Thermometers under the tongue benefit from a large blood supply and with a closed mouth aren't affected as much from room temperatures, but are probably a hassle in hospital to keep clean unlike the ear probes which have disposable covers.

 

 

 

ICU/operating theatres use probes in nasopharynx, indwelling bladder catheters, blood vessels in the centre of the chest. Most accurate but obvious limitations.

 

 


 
 
 
 


559 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 43


  # 2261735 21-Jun-2019 07:58
One person supports this post
Send private message quote this post

Stick with a decent electronic one like Braun same as they use in the ambulances, we have a daughter with severe seziures use it all the time very accurate

14889 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2795

Trusted
Subscriber

  # 2261790 21-Jun-2019 09:08
Send private message quote this post

We use a Medisana from Farmers bought during a 50% off sale, does ear and forehead, and those readings roughly match. I have no idea how accurate it is, but it roughly matches how how our son feels.


1673 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 283

Subscriber

  # 2261800 21-Jun-2019 09:26
Send private message quote this post

You should stick with the tympanic thermometer.  They are superior to infared, and while an underarm digital thermometer is shown to be as accurate the tympanic one takes a few seconds.  One tip with them is to ensure you are either pulling the helix (of the ear) up in anyone over 3 or pulling the lobe down for under 3's during taking it, this straightens the canal out and allows the probe to take the temp of the tympanic membrane correctly.  I have seen many a poor technique using them coming back with strange (normally hyopthermic) results.


47 posts

Geek
+1 received by user: 1

Trusted

  # 2261801 21-Jun-2019 09:35
Send private message quote this post

I am planning to buy one too. I am thinking of buying this one:- https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07S5HX4R5/

It can do both forehead and ear readings. The reviews for this and previous versions are good.

531 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 333


  # 2261827 21-Jun-2019 10:25
One person supports this post
Send private message quote this post

+1 Braun. We bought ours after reccomendations from the various mum groups my wife's a member of. 

 

Very quick, I love the quiet beep feedback and battery lasts forever.


 
 
 
 


847 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 248

Subscriber

  # 2261844 21-Jun-2019 11:26
3 people support this post
Send private message quote this post

Being a recently retired Paediatric Nurse stick with the tympanic or under the arm variety of good quality. Pay the money. Braun being my choice for tympanic and Terumo’s Digital Thermometers under arm (they have a blue dot hinge). With young children and even adolescent avoid under the tongue as they tend to play with them - roll them around in the month, bite them, etc.

 

NEVER use glass thermometers with children anywhere on/in the body.

 

@afe66 post sums up the non-contact range very nicely - don't use them.

 

Awake or asleep, it is preferable to take the temperature under the arm ensuring you get it well seated against the skin and hold the arm down firmly. Hugging the child whilst doing this can make it a more pleasurable experience for you both.

 

Children, including babies, do not like things in their ears, it tickles, even though they have a habit of putting things in there themselves.

 

Also, and this is important, if in taking a tympanic temperature, you do not aim it correctly or there is wax build up, you will get an inaccurate reading.

 

Normal Temperature = 37.0 Celsius.

 

Temperatures between 37.0 and 38.0 (low grade temperature) try cooling the child down first before you reach for the pills & syrups. Remove bedding, just a sheet only. Remove those layers of clothes, nappies/undies and a singlet only. Cooling face flannel wipe down. Open up the room but no drafts, fresh cool air is good. Slightly off aim indirect fans are also good.

 

For temp's greater than 38.0 give liquid paracetamol. Read the bottle for the correct dosage. DO NOT exceed this. No more than 4 doses in 24 hours. Children can OD on paracetamol very quickly.

 

Safe Use Of Paracetamol in Children

 

If this low grade temperature does not come down after 24 hours or it exceeds 38.5, at any time, get off to your GP or Emergency Department ASAP.

 

Always be on the look out for; rashes, light sensitivity, neck stiffness, lethargy, high pitch cries, the shakes - severe shivering (rigor attack). In infants and toddlers, a temperature exceeding 38 can, on rare occasions, cause a seizure known as a Febrile Convulsion. DO NOT muck around - call 111. The difference between a shiver and a seizure is that the child is conscious or easily arousable when shivering.

 

Ensure they have plenty of fluids and watch their output, weight their nappies.

 

Stay calm and portray calmness, even though you might be a mess yourself. I know it can be difficult and sometimes harrowing to have a sick child. But children right into adolescence will develop fevers with no known cause (PUO = pyrexia of unknown origin). This is just the developing immune system leaning to fight all the diseases that are out there.

 

Go with your 'gut feeling'. Remember you know your child best. Not the nurse or the doctor or even grandma.





iMac 27" (late 2013), Airport Time Capsule + Airport Express, iPhone7, iPad6, iPad Mini2

 

Panasonic Blu-ray PVR DMR-BWT835 + Panasonic Viera TH-L50E6Z, Chromecast Ultra




1019 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 19


  # 2263427 24-Jun-2019 14:25
One person supports this post
Send private message quote this post

Thanks for the fantastic advice people, I'll stick with the traditional thermometers!!


257 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 26


  # 2267848 1-Jul-2019 16:29
Send private message quote this post

just came across this topic, we have an infrared thermometer from Aliexpress and it's pretty random. We don't really trust it, only use it as a guideline.

 

@FineWine that's pretty hefty, to go to the ER for a temperature above 38.5C? We've done some reading, and I believe nowadays the idea is that the temperature is not the most important, but how well the child responds. E.g. if it responds fine, drinks ok, no stiff neck, a temp up to ~40C is still fine. But e.g. if it doesn't drink, 38C is a problem?

 

Our kids are not sick often, but can get temperatures of 39C. As long as they respond, and drink well, I'm not so worried. It's their body fighting the infection/disease, so only want to give pamol if required. Not just with anything above 38C.

 

I want the best for my kids, so keen to know your story better.


847 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 248

Subscriber

  # 2267895 1-Jul-2019 18:01
Send private message quote this post

boland:

 

just came across this topic, we have an infrared thermometer from Aliexpress and it's pretty random. We don't really trust it, only use it as a guideline.

 

@FineWine that's pretty hefty, to go to the ER for a temperature above 38.5C? We've done some reading, and I believe nowadays the idea is that the temperature is not the most important, but how well the child responds. E.g. if it responds fine, drinks ok, no stiff neck, a temp up to ~40C is still fine. But e.g. if it doesn't drink, 38C is a problem?

 

Our kids are not sick often, but can get temperatures of 39C. As long as they respond, and drink well, I'm not so worried. It's their body fighting the infection/disease, so only want to give pamol if required. Not just with anything above 38C.

 

I want the best for my kids, so keen to know your story better.

 

To some extent I agree with you. Remember I did say at the end: Go with your 'gut feeling'. Remember you know your child best. Not the nurse or the doctor or even grandma.

 

You sound like an intelligent and sensible parent who knows their children. Sadly a lot of parents ARE NOT and DO NOT, this is why organisations such as Plunket and Karitani are important.

 

My story is in the first paragraph: Being a recently retired Paediatric Nurse of 23 years working solely with sick children. 20 of those at the then largest children's hospital in the southern hemisphere "The Children's at Westmead" Sydney and the last years at Tauranga Hospital children's ward.

 

What a lot of adults and even medical personal tend to forget is that children are not small adults. That is why we do everything based on weight. I have lost count on the number of times I have picked up doctors for writing incorrect drug dosages for children, this is why the majority of medications for children are double checked (2 nurses or nurse & doctor) they have NO tolerance. eg. the average toxic dose of paracetamol in adults is <10gms whilst in children it is <5gms all depending on the persons weight & present health. Most OD paracetamol cases I saw were in the Asian population. Wrap the child up snugly in a warm airless room and shovel the paracetamol down. Even on the ward, you go in and strip the bed and child down and come back 5 minutes later and they are all wrapped up again as snug as a bug in a rug.

 

I digress. As I said: If this low grade temperature does not come down after 24 hours or it exceeds 38.5, at any time, get off to your GP or Emergency Department ASAP.

 

Children do not have temperature tolerance like us adults. Heat loss in humans is through a system called the thermoregulatory system; conduction, convection, radiation, and evaporation, radiation and convection being the two best methods. But in children the greatest heat loss, per body weight, is respiratory heat loss representing about one third of the total heat loss. This is why you should open the room up and allow fresh cool dry indirect air in. The next is evaporation: Remove bedding, just a sheet only. Remove those layers of clothes, nappies/undies and a singlet only.

 

The younger the child the more cautious you have to be. As I said: a temperature exceeding 38 can, on rare occasions, cause a seizure known as a Febrile Convulsion. DO NOT muck around - call 111.

 

I have had this occur right in front of me with a 2 year old. It is scary. The parents don't help, mums tend to scream. Dads freeze or yell "do something".

 

Hope this answers your queries 😀

 

 





iMac 27" (late 2013), Airport Time Capsule + Airport Express, iPhone7, iPad6, iPad Mini2

 

Panasonic Blu-ray PVR DMR-BWT835 + Panasonic Viera TH-L50E6Z, Chromecast Ultra


257 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 26


  # 2267898 1-Jul-2019 18:04
Send private message quote this post

Thanks @FineWine that answers my questions perfectly!


559 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 43


  # 2277530 16-Jul-2019 06:19
Send private message quote this post

boland:

Thanks @FineWine that answers my questions perfectly!



Very good advice thank you, we have a child that used to have regular Febrile Convulsions very scary lost count of ambulance rides we still monitor her closely with temp compared to our older 8 year old. The Convulsions seem to have stopped since she had her tonsils out touch wood.

Create new topic



Twitter and LinkedIn »



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:





News »

Dunedin selects Telensa to deliver smart street lighting for 15,000 LEDs
Posted 18-Jul-2019 10:21


Sprint announces a connected wallet card with built-in IoT support
Posted 18-Jul-2019 08:36


Educational tool developed at Otago makes international launch
Posted 17-Jul-2019 21:57


Symantec introduces cloud access security solution
Posted 17-Jul-2019 21:48


New Zealand government unveils new digital service to make business easier
Posted 16-Jul-2019 17:35


Scientists unveil image of quantum entanglement
Posted 13-Jul-2019 06:00


Hackers to be challenged at University of Waikato
Posted 12-Jul-2019 21:34


OPPO Reno Z now available in New Zealand
Posted 12-Jul-2019 21:28


Sony introduces WF-1000XM3 wireless headphones with noise cancellation
Posted 8-Jul-2019 16:56


Xero announces new smarter tools, push into the North American market
Posted 19-Jun-2019 17:20


New report by Unisys shows New Zealanders want action by social platform companies and police to monitor social media sites
Posted 19-Jun-2019 17:09


ASB adds Google Pay option to contactless payments
Posted 19-Jun-2019 17:05


New Zealand PC Market declines on the back of high channel inventory, IDC reports
Posted 18-Jun-2019 17:35


Air New Zealand uses drones to inspect aircraft
Posted 17-Jun-2019 15:39


TCL Electronics launches its first-ever 8K TV
Posted 17-Jun-2019 15:18



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.


Support Geekzone »

Our community of supporters help make Geekzone possible. Click the button below to join them.

Support Geezone on PressPatron



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.