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gjm



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Topic # 147328 16-Jun-2014 13:23
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Our office is moving soon and I will no longer have a car park so have decided to buy a motorbike to commute on. I have had my car license for a long time but hold no motorcycle license so have to do my licensing tests again, the first part if which is a basic handling skills test.

Can anyone recommend a good motorbike school in central Auckland where I could learn to ride and take this test? I've found lots from google but hopefully people can chime in with their personal experiences.

Thanks




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  Reply # 1066612 16-Jun-2014 13:37
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Have a chat with the people at ProRider (http://www.prorider.co.nz) they'll point you in the right direction ... I've been riding 25years (hmmm, now I feel old and I'm only 40!!! :-) and I did a gravel riding course with them, very knowledgable people, and good at passing it along.

If you've not got a bike or gear then get yourself a cheapie little 250 (GN250s are the staple learners bike it seems, a smaller/slower bike will just make you feel more vulnerable as people try to bully you into going faster, you need something that can zip up to ) and buy decent gear, actually as a learner you should be spending more money on the protective gear than on the bike! :-)  And don't buy "Revit" gear, it's junk .. I have it and it doesn't offer anywhere near as much protection as it should (still better than shorts and t-shirt though).


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  Reply # 1066616 16-Jun-2014 13:39
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Hmm.. might be keen to keep an eye on this thread. been wanting to learn to ride a motorike for a long time (even had a few go's while I was traveling around India). Would be keen to know if there are any good deals going around for learning to ride a bike!

 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 1066624 16-Jun-2014 13:45
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Mark: Have a chat with the people at ProRider (http://www.prorider.co.nz) they'll point you in the right direction ... I've been riding 25years (hmmm, now I feel old and I'm only 40!!! :-) and I did a gravel riding course with them, very knowledgable people, and good at passing it along.

If you've not got a bike or gear then get yourself a cheapie little 250 (GN250s are the staple learners bike it seems, a smaller/slower bike will just make you feel more vulnerable as people try to bully you into going faster, you need something that can zip up to ) and buy decent gear, actually as a learner you should be spending more money on the protective gear than on the bike! :-)  And don't buy "Revit" gear, it's junk .. I have it and it doesn't offer anywhere near as much protection as it should (still better than shorts and t-shirt though).



ok thanks, I will check prorider out. I am eyeing up a honda cbr250r to learn on and keep for commuting. I see ninja 250s everywhere as well but they seem about the same as the honda however I like the look of the honda better. Def buying protective gear as well...will buy a helmet new but what do people think about second hand jacket / pants etc?

Cheers,




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  Reply # 1066633 16-Jun-2014 13:55
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gjm:

ok thanks, I will check prorider out. I am eyeing up a honda cbr250r to learn on and keep for commuting. I see ninja 250s everywhere as well but they seem about the same as the honda however I like the look of the honda better. Def buying protective gear as well...will buy a helmet new but what do people think about second hand jacket / pants etc?

Cheers,


CBR200Rs are fun bikes, you might want to check it's on the LAMs list though, they are pretty quick and twitchy machines ... oh and f'ing uncomfortable for longer commutes.
If you want something LAMs and fun, go look at a motard :-)

Second hand gear is alright, probably buy waterproofs new as they tend not to stay waterproof when they are old, also make sure all the internal armour is still in the places it should be, they tend to move about inside the lining in old jackets and trousers.  And yes only ever buy a new helmet, and if you drop it .. go off and buy another one, they are one use items only and dropping them on the floor can fracture them, meaning they may not deform properly in a real accident.
Buying good gloves is a must too.



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  Reply # 1066738 16-Jun-2014 15:39
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Mark:
gjm:

ok thanks, I will check prorider out. I am eyeing up a honda cbr250r to learn on and keep for commuting. I see ninja 250s everywhere as well but they seem about the same as the honda however I like the look of the honda better. Def buying protective gear as well...will buy a helmet new but what do people think about second hand jacket / pants etc?

Cheers,


CBR200Rs are fun bikes, you might want to check it's on the LAMs list though, they are pretty quick and twitchy machines ... oh and f'ing uncomfortable for longer commutes.
If you want something LAMs and fun, go look at a motard :-)

Second hand gear is alright, probably buy waterproofs new as they tend not to stay waterproof when they are old, also make sure all the internal armour is still in the places it should be, they tend to move about inside the lining in old jackets and trousers.  And yes only ever buy a new helmet, and if you drop it .. go off and buy another one, they are one use items only and dropping them on the floor can fracture them, meaning they may not deform properly in a real accident.
Buying good gloves is a must too.




Everybody has a different style and prefernece for riding, but this is my 2cents.

Long time rider here, have trained many to ride. I +1'd this post because you will see the CBR200 is a more upright sittting position than the CBR250R. I think this is important because your first ride will be you learning where you 'fit' in traffic and that bike needs to be one you can look around on. An upright sit allows you to see two or three cars ahead in traffic queues as well as making yourself visible to others. The CBR250R will have you lying down and possibly out of vision of others, as well as guessing what lies in front of the immediate obstacles in your path. More than that, the best part of owning a bike is summer rides and vacations and upright seating allows you to have more time on the coastline roads, taking in views as well as a little room behind you for your pack and sleeping bag.

Biking is the most fun ever, good luck and enjoy it all, safely.

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  Reply # 1066779 16-Jun-2014 16:21
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Hi,

If you got your own bike i am sure JohnR and i can come and give you a hand.
For a learner bike i would suggest a motard or a dual sport. They are comfortable and have great vision. I started on a CBR250R and i am too big for it. Also it is quite easy to grow out of..

Let me know if you want to catch up.

 


Cheers

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  Reply # 1066782 16-Jun-2014 16:25
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Also, Douglas Swanson is a good guy to do handling skills with. He will give you a ride of his bike and let you get used to it etc then do the test.

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  Reply # 1066785 16-Jun-2014 16:28
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Bike now must comply with LAMS 
http://www.nzta.govt.nz/licence/getting/motorcycles/lams.html

A lot of trainers have now signed up to the new Competency Based Training & Assessment (CBTA) for motorcycles.  Saves time and ensures training is targeted and relevant.  You now have the choice between CBTA and traditional licencing methods.  Highly recommend a CBTA approach.
http://www.nzta.govt.nz/licence/getting/motorcycles/cbta.html

One piece of advice I was given when learning that has seen me steadfastly through more miles than I ever imagined..."ride as if everyone else on the road is out to kill you".

Good luck, it's great fun once it gets into your blood.    




Always be yourself, unless you can be Batman, then always be the Batman



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  Reply # 1066796 16-Jun-2014 16:41
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Hi adding my five cents worth. I'm plus size and age and still on a restricted. I used Trevor from http://www.motorcycleriding.co.nz/Basic.html and ProRider as mentioned before I started on a CBR250 and as I ride from East Ack to the Nth shore daily the 250 it did not have enough puff on the motorway, faded in a head wind. I now ride a CB500X very easy to ride and upright position, I can see over cars and through them. You have lots of choices for Lams approved bikes. With gear you can get some really good beginner gear package deals to start you off. You will soon spend more on quality boots and a better helmet etc if riding daily to stay dry and warm. Remember ride safe and get good gear.





"The only way to learn some- thing is to do it"

gjm



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  Reply # 1066862 16-Jun-2014 17:57
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thanks for all the replies guys. Ive been a cyclist for quite a few years so am used to riding like people are out to kill me. Also used to ride a scooter for a few years while at uni so hopefully these things will come into play and help me be a good rider. A 250 should be fine for me as there isnt any motorway riding on the way to work and (for the moment at least) this is strictly for commuting / avoiding parking hassles.

Cheers again....any more advice more then welcome.




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  Reply # 1066866 16-Jun-2014 18:02
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gjm: thanks for all the replies guys. Ive been a cyclist for quite a few years so am used to riding like people are out to kill me. Also used to ride a scooter for a few years while at uni so hopefully these things will come into play and help me be a good rider. A 250 should be fine for me as there isnt any motorway riding on the way to work and (for the moment at least) this is strictly for commuting / avoiding parking hassles.

Cheers again....any more advice more then welcome.


Sounds like you are starting off better than 90% of us :)

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  Reply # 1067012 16-Jun-2014 20:53
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I have been thinking about this a lot too and once I have enough money I will do it. Question though, what's a good bike to learn on but also suitable for highway and motorway riding? My work commute will involve both.

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  Reply # 1067077 16-Jun-2014 21:44
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sdav: I have been thinking about this a lot too and once I have enough money I will do it. Question though, what's a good bike to learn on but also suitable for highway and motorway riding? My work commute will involve both.


If you are going on the main highway you are going to want to be on something that can keep up with traffic and have enough go to get you out of trouble .. so anything 250cc+ is probably going to cut it, I'm a fan of motards (cause I have one), they are nice and high up (so you can see over most cars), are about the best handling machines for traffic (tight turning angles combined with good balance, light weight and narrow to fit through gaps), have more than enough go to get ahead when at the front of the queue (or to over take or sprint for the gap if in trouble) and if you do drop them they shrug off most damage as they are a dirt bike with sports wheels (and bits are cheap!)  Plus something like my DR-Z400SM is LAMs compliant :-)

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  Reply # 1067097 16-Jun-2014 22:01
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Mark:
sdav: I have been thinking about this a lot too and once I have enough money I will do it. Question though, what's a good bike to learn on but also suitable for highway and motorway riding? My work commute will involve both.


If you are going on the main highway you are going to want to be on something that can keep up with traffic and have enough go to get you out of trouble .. so anything 250cc+ is probably going to cut it, I'm a fan of motards (cause I have one), they are nice and high up (so you can see over most cars), are about the best handling machines for traffic (tight turning angles combined with good balance, light weight and narrow to fit through gaps), have more than enough go to get ahead when at the front of the queue (or to over take or sprint for the gap if in trouble) and if you do drop them they shrug off most damage as they are a dirt bike with sports wheels (and bits are cheap!)  Plus something like my DR-Z400SM is LAMs compliant :-)


O, U liek moterds too?
Ooo you live in Auckland?
Come rides with Tim!

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  Reply # 1067111 16-Jun-2014 22:15
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TimA:

O, U liek moterds too?
Ooo you live in Auckland?
Come rides with Tim!


Here is some more coincidence ... I'm also sitting at Vodafone this week too (France Street though) :-)

You should joins the MotardedNZ Facebook group ;-)  Bunch of Motarded Aucklanders there and usually a run goes off to do something noisy on the weekend.



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