Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.


rhy7s

405 posts

Ultimate Geek


#277220 2-Oct-2020 09:27
Send private message quote this post

Just wanted to check on this. When we had a windscreen replaced a while ago, the installer said they would charge for a new one if they broke it, which seems a bit strange, it seems like they have an incentive to not be careful and you would normally think businesses would either have their own insurance or build in a margin to their cost to cover their expected rate of breakage. Anyway, just now we've had rust repair around a side window and Smith&Smith broke the glass and have charged for the replacement (or rather charged the panel beaters who will pass it on to us), has anyone been around this topic before in regards to consumer protection? Is this just standard in the industry?


Create new topic
Yogi02
208 posts

Master Geek


  #2577815 2-Oct-2020 09:35
Send private message quote this post

You can remove a window without breaking it but it does take care and time and there is a chance of it breaking. Saying that, the sceptic in me can picture it being easier and quicker to take out without care and double dip with a glass repair. 


xpd

xpd
Im a pirate
10802 posts

Uber Geek

Retired Mod
Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  #2577818 2-Oct-2020 09:37
Send private message quote this post

In certain cases if the glass was already damaged, then fair enough - but I'd be wanting evidence of the damage before being charged.

 

 





XPD^ / DemiseNZ

 

Blog         Free Games        Twitter      My TradeMe Goodies

 

Pirating in Sea Of Thieves

 

Coming Soon - BBS door games - all the classics!

 

 


 
 
 
 


rhy7s

405 posts

Ultimate Geek


  #2577822 2-Oct-2020 09:49
Send private message quote this post

xpd:

 

In certain cases if the glass was already damaged, then fair enough - but I'd be wanting evidence of the damage before being charged.

 

 

The reason in neither of the cases mentioned in our situation was glass damage, it was being removed and replaced for rust work.


KrazyKid
917 posts

Ultimate Geek

Subscriber

  #2577853 2-Oct-2020 11:11
Send private message quote this post

Surely it comes down to what you agreed to when you dropped the car off for repair.

 

Personally if you didn't agree to pay for replacement glass the person who broke it should pay to fix it.

 

Mitigating factors would include existing damage or faults.

 

However if liability was in a contract I signed and didn't read properly then all bets are off, I pay for the glass.


gzt

gzt
11677 posts

Uber Geek

Lifetime subscriber

  #2578334 2-Oct-2020 21:36
Send private message quote this post

This is normal practice. I don't know the reason. Safety glass builds up stress over time and becomes brittle maybe. Ask and they will tell you why.

Handle9
4753 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  #2578340 2-Oct-2020 22:01
Send private message quote this post

If they have to remove the glass to do the repair then it's fair enough, providing they made you aware of the risk. If it is difficult for a competent contractor to remove the glass without breaking it then, providing it is disclosed, then you should pay. It's part of doing the job and not something caused by negligence.

 

If they broke it by being rough or negligent then they should pay. If they didn't tell you about the risks of breaking the glass they should pay.


richms
23681 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

  #2578371 2-Oct-2020 23:40
Send private message quote this post

Its part of the risk of working on an old car. Plenty of times things get damaged during work and have to be replaced, why should the place doing the work wear the loss unless they were negligent in it happening. Whenever my mechanic has had something fail that was their fault they sorted it no questions or hassles, but if theyre working on something and something else breaks then not their fault.





Richard rich.ms

 
 
 
 


snnet
947 posts

Ultimate Geek

Subscriber

  #2578429 3-Oct-2020 03:00
Send private message quote this post

This is fair if you were forewarned - they'd simply have to quote every job to include the replacement of the windscreen otherwise and you'd have had to pay for it without even knowing. All they are doing is giving you the best possible price -- if the glass didn't break, great, you win and the cost is cheaper for the job


Wheelbarrow01
1026 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Chorus

  #2578732 3-Oct-2020 21:50
Send private message quote this post

Just to be clear, if the glass in question was bonded to the car (aka glued in using adhesive), it is almost impossible to remove without breaking it, even by the experts. Automotive glass installed in this manner provides additional structural integrity to the vehicle. Glass held in by rubber gaskets such as in older cars does not have the same removal issues, but it also provides no structural benefits either.

 

If the car in question was manufactured in the '80's or later, any side windows that don't wind up or down along with the front and rear windscreens are likely to be bonded, and realistically the glass will almost always be sacrificed during the removal process. Nothing to do with skill really, just a characteristic of how modern cars are designed.

 

Having said that, it would have been nice if they had at least set that expectation with you so that you were aware upfront that the glass would be sacrificed during the rust repair process.


Bung
3503 posts

Uber Geek

Subscriber

  #2578744 3-Oct-2020 23:25
Send private message quote this post

There seem to be a surprising array of urethane bonded glass removal tools available for a job that is nearly always impossible.

I'd ask the panel beaters what their experience was with different glass companies.

richms
23681 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

  #2578832 4-Oct-2020 09:56
Send private message quote this post

Bung: There seem to be a surprising array of urethane bonded glass removal tools available for a job that is nearly always impossible.

I'd ask the panel beaters what their experience was with different glass companies.

 

Then you're paying labour on something that is still very failure prone, if the glass is replaceable at low cost then its not economical to remove safely as that can take forever and still has considerable risk.





Richard rich.ms

Bung
3503 posts

Uber Geek

Subscriber

  #2578933 4-Oct-2020 11:27
Send private message quote this post

That can be understandable. I had some windscreen scratches that were annoying at night. The glass place said they could polish them out but it would take time and they suggested if I had glass cover a rock would fix it faster. I think as far as removal goes maybe they've just decided a centre punch is cheaper than a specialist urethane cutter.

robjg63
3166 posts

Uber Geek


  #2579033 4-Oct-2020 13:55
Send private message quote this post

Removing old glass would always have a high risk of breakage.
It sounds like the panel beater couldn't remove it - hence Smith & Smith being brought in.
I assume by that, it was bonded glass and that is almost fused to the car.
Very high odds of breaking.




Nothing is impossible for the man who doesn't have to do it himself - A. H. Weiler


rhy7s

405 posts

Ultimate Geek


  #2579388 5-Oct-2020 08:59
Send private message quote this post

Thanks for the discussion, as far as I know it was broken being put back in, but I hear that the whole process is stressful for the glass. Of the various panel beaters the rest of the family has dealt with for, they've all outsourced the glass removal and replacement step.


BlueShift
1568 posts

Uber Geek


  #2579411 5-Oct-2020 09:19
Send private message quote this post

I had the opposite on one of my old cars - went in for a (insurance paid) windscreen replacement and ended up paying for a bunch of rust removal as a chunk of the frame came out with the windscreen...


Create new topic





News »

Huawei launches IdeaHub Pro in New Zealand
Posted 27-Oct-2020 16:41


Southland-based IT specialist providing virtual services worldwide
Posted 27-Oct-2020 15:55


NASA discovers water on sunlit surface of Moon
Posted 27-Oct-2020 08:30


Huawei introduces new features to Petal Search, Maps and Docs
Posted 26-Oct-2020 18:05


Nokia selected by NASA to build first ever cellular network on the Moon
Posted 21-Oct-2020 08:34


Nanoleaf enhances lighting line with launch of Triangles and Mini Triangles
Posted 17-Oct-2020 20:18


Synology unveils DS16211+
Posted 17-Oct-2020 20:12


Ingram Micro introduces FootfallCam to New Zealand channel
Posted 17-Oct-2020 20:06


Dropbox adopts Virtual First working policy
Posted 17-Oct-2020 19:47


OPPO announces Reno4 Series 5G line-up in NZ
Posted 16-Oct-2020 08:52


Microsoft Highway to a Hundred expands to Asia Pacific
Posted 14-Oct-2020 09:34


Spark turns on 5G in Auckland
Posted 14-Oct-2020 09:29


AMD Launches AMD Ryzen 5000 Series Desktop Processors
Posted 9-Oct-2020 10:13


Teletrac Navman launches integrated multi-camera solution for transport and logistics industry
Posted 8-Oct-2020 10:57


Farmside hits 10,000 RBI customers
Posted 7-Oct-2020 15:32









Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.


Support Geekzone »

Our community of supporters help make Geekzone possible. Click the button below to join them.

Support Geezone on PressPatron



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.