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141 posts

Master Geek
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Topic # 191775 16-Feb-2016 09:52
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Hi 

 

Ok so we all know that the MySky units run pretty warm.  Add to that my home AV units, set top boxes, plug units and blu ray etc in a cupboard with little ventilation and the excellent Central Otago weather topping 36° on a regular basis for 3 months of the year and you can understand that i need some cooling solutions !

 

So being a cheapskate i decided to cobble together some old PC cooling fans i had lying around and build myself a cooling unit.

 

I found out some old USB cables i didnt really need anymore and chopped them up and spliced in the PC fan units to work off the USB.

 

Plugged the USB in to the front USB on the mysky box and hey presto.. a spinning cooling fan !

 

Took another PCU fan and connected it to an old mobile phone charger and hey presto cooling fan No 2.

 

Now the next step is to try and install a temperature control ... any smart idea for a thermostat switch ?? 

 

:) 

 

  


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2499 posts

Uber Geek
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  Reply # 1493119 16-Feb-2016 11:14
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Store?

 

I thought you were talking about an interesting HiFi/AV shop!

 

YOu almost need something simple like this:

 

http://www.surplustronics.co.nz/products/6672-thermostat

 

Just a simple bi-metalic adjustable thermostat - but perhaps this just keeps the circuit closed until the temperature is reached (like an oven would work) - Guess you would want the opposite.





Nothing is impossible for the man who doesn't have to do it himself - A. H. Weiler

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  Reply # 1493121 16-Feb-2016 11:18
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Mercury is the easiest, not to mention the most hazardous (and possibly illegal). Get a mercury thermometer, break it and extract the mercury, make sure to deeply inhale the vapours, then put it in a straw or similar tube with your contact point at each end, there's your thermostat.

 

 

 

 





I reject your reality and substitute my own. - Adam Savage
 


 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 1493122 16-Feb-2016 11:19
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Maybe this is what you need:

 

http://www.jaycar.co.nz/Passive-Components/Circuit-Protection/Thermal-Switches-%26-Fuses/Normally-Open-Thermostat-Switch---50-Degrees/p/ST3831

 

Doesnt look like they have any that work at less than 50 degrees. But essentially its exactly the sort of thing you want. It reaches 50 degrees and closes the circuit (ie the power switches on).





Nothing is impossible for the man who doesn't have to do it himself - A. H. Weiler

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  Reply # 1493127 16-Feb-2016 11:24
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Rikkitic:

 

Mercury is the easiest, not to mention the most hazardous (and possibly illegal). Get a mercury thermometer, break it and extract the mercury, make sure to deeply inhale the vapours, then put it in a straw or similar tube with your contact point at each end, there's your thermostat.

 

 

 

I know enough to be dangerous. Not enough to be sensible.

 

 

I know enough to be dangerous. Not enough to be sensible - or helpful.





Nothing is impossible for the man who doesn't have to do it himself - A. H. Weiler



141 posts

Master Geek
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Reply # 1493128 16-Feb-2016 11:25
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Yep that sort of thing, was wondering if someone maybe had an idea about ripping something off an old fridge or similar... 

 

I was going to have a look on trade me for something that would click on at about 30°..i reckon the cupboard sits around 25-28° and with everything on probably bumps up to about 36° then stuff starts to get pretty hot..

 

That kind of thing is right though in that it can be wired in easily and costs next to bugger all.

 

:)

 

 

 




141 posts

Master Geek
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Reply # 1493130 16-Feb-2016 11:27
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Rikkitic:

 

Mercury is the easiest, not to mention the most hazardous (and possibly illegal). Get a mercury thermometer, break it and extract the mercury, make sure to deeply inhale the vapours, then put it in a straw or similar tube with your contact point at each end, there's your thermostat.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

i could even use the surplus to make a new hat !i like the style of your thinking ! 




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Master Geek
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  Reply # 1493131 16-Feb-2016 11:28
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robjg63:

 

Store?

 

 

 

 

 

 

as in storage. 


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  Reply # 1493132 16-Feb-2016 11:29
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I use 140mm PC fans to cool my AV unit - one on top to draw air through, one at the back of the case. They're so quiet I never bothered with a thermostat.





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Master Geek
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  Reply # 1493134 16-Feb-2016 11:33
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You could use something like this and some more PC fans. You could power it with an old computer power supply also if you have one around.

 

This is a more complete programmable solution but more expensive.


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  Reply # 1493137 16-Feb-2016 11:34
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Was just thinking about this some more and have to agree with what Timmmay says.

 

There as some fans that are made to be particularly quiet - so why have them switching on and off all the time?

 

http://www.pbtech.co.nz/index.php?z=p&p=FANCOR1123&name=Corsair--Air-Flow-AF120-Quiet-Edition-Case-Fan-(WH

 

http://www.pbtech.co.nz/index.php?z=p&p=FANCOR1142&name=Corsair-Air-Series-AF140-LED-White-Quiet-Edition-H

 

A couple of these and you are sorted - these ones have cool lighting as well - give your cabinet a sci-fi glow!





Nothing is impossible for the man who doesn't have to do it himself - A. H. Weiler



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Master Geek
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  Reply # 1493140 16-Feb-2016 11:37
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true 

 

i had them running full time but was just thinking that it would be energy efficient of me to build in a thermostat - if i could wire in something akin to a switch i would be happy knowing i was caring for my AV and the environment ! 

 

i know right !cool

 

 




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Master Geek
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  Reply # 1493141 16-Feb-2016 11:38
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  Reply # 1493168 16-Feb-2016 12:05
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A couple of larger 12v 120mm fans, in series. They will each run at 6v, still with sufficient airflow, but at a slower speed that shouldn't be audible.

 

Thermostat added as per previous posts would also be of benefit ...

 

 

 

 





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Master Geek
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  Reply # 1493404 16-Feb-2016 19:35
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An Arduino cooling fan project is screaming at me




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  Reply # 1493412 16-Feb-2016 19:50
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I've talked to numerous installers who recommend the following.

 

 

 

One fan to pull cold air in.

 

One fan to suck hot air out.

 

 

 

Using the 12 volt triggers on the back of an AVR to switch the fan on / off when the amp itself is powered up.

 

Some even link in a second extraction fan when the 2nd or 3rd zone is utilised by their customer.

 

They comment that many thermostats simply don't seem to be reliable... which I find odd. But they're the full-time pros... so make your own conclusion.

 

They all use larger lower speed fans to keep things nice and cool, yet quiet.


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