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Topic # 238112 3-Jul-2018 17:51
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Interesting article here

 

https://www.techhive.com/article/3239350/smart-tv/will-hdr-kill-your-oled-tv.html

 

Since I don't have OLED not an issue for me but something to think about when I look at a new 4K TV.





System One: Popcorn Hour A200,  PS3 SuperSlim, NPVR and Plex Server running on Gigabyte Brix (Windows 10 Pro), Sony BDP-S390 BD player, Pioneer AVR, Raspberry Pi running Kodi and Plex, Panasonic 60" 3D plasma, Google Chromecast

System Two: Popcorn Hour A200 ,  Oppo BDP-80 BluRay Player with hardware mode to be region free, Vivitek HD1080P 1080P DLP projector with 100" screen. Harman Kardon HK AVR 254 7.1 receiver, Samsung 4K player, Google Chromecast

 


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  Reply # 2048544 3-Jul-2018 20:24
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Be a long time until default video source broadcast in nz is hdr...

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  Reply # 2048776 4-Jul-2018 10:04
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Interesting read, but overly worrying.

 

His more reasonable estimate towards the the end of the article of a reduction to 80,000 hours is still a life long life.

 

I'd call myself a heavy user (for someone who has a fulltime job), so a generous estimate would be 40 hours per week. If my maths is correct, that's 38 years before it is down to 50% brightness.

 

So over 7 years to drop 10% (with the TV doing some clever compensation to deal with that 10%).

 

And in 7 years I'll probably be looking to replace it with whatever the latest and greatest thing is anyway.

 

 


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  Reply # 2048781 4-Jul-2018 10:13
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Paul1977:

 

Interesting read, but overly worrying.

 

His more reasonable estimate towards the the end of the article of a reduction to 80,000 hours is still a life long life.

 

I'd call myself a heavy user (for someone who has a fulltime job), so a generous estimate would be 40 hours per week. If my maths is correct, that's 38 years before it is down to 50% brightness.

 

So over 7 years to drop 10% (with the TV doing some clever compensation to deal with that 10%).

 

And in 7 years I'll probably be looking to replace it with whatever the latest and greatest thing is anyway.

 

 

 

 

There were similar (apparent) worries with Panasonic plasmas doing overly agressive compensation for aging display panels.

 

Basically the steps for bumping up the brightness as the panels aged was said to be too noticeable.

 

My old plamsa is used for 5-6 hours every day and is 8 or 9 years old and I cant say I have ever noticed any issues.

 

The theoretical lifespan of the panels exceeds any actual lifespan of the other components anyway.

 

(Hmm - with smart TVs the software will be junk long before the TV wears out anyway)





Nothing is impossible for the man who doesn't have to do it himself - A. H. Weiler

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  Reply # 2048782 4-Jul-2018 10:13
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Paul1977:

 

Interesting read, but overly worrying.

 

His more reasonable estimate towards the the end of the article of a reduction to 80,000 hours is still a life long life.

 

I'd call myself a heavy user (for someone who has a fulltime job), so a generous estimate would be 40 hours per week. If my maths is correct, that's 38 years before it is down to 50% brightness.

 

So over 7 years to drop 10% (with the TV doing some clever compensation to deal with that 10%).

 

And in 7 years I'll probably be looking to replace it with whatever the latest and greatest thing is anyway.

 

 

 

 

There were similar (apparent) worries with Panasonic plasmas doing overly agressive compensation for aging display panels.

 

Basically the steps for bumping up the brightness as the panels aged was said to be too noticeable.

 

My old plamsa is used for 5-6 hours every day and is 8 or 9 years old and I cant say I have ever noticed any issues.

 

The theoretical lifespan of the panels exceeds any actual lifespan of the other components anyway.

 

(Hmm - with smart TVs the software will be junk long before the TV wears out anyway)





Nothing is impossible for the man who doesn't have to do it himself - A. H. Weiler



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  Reply # 2049241 4-Jul-2018 20:39
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I think the article does give you some pause if you were thinking of getting OLED and watch a lot of TV.

 

I still have my 60" plasma (Panasonic) and will keep that until OLED or something as good (QLED, Quantum Dot?) is price competitive. Or else get LED and put up with less than black blacks and not so good off angle viewing (which is relevant in my room)





System One: Popcorn Hour A200,  PS3 SuperSlim, NPVR and Plex Server running on Gigabyte Brix (Windows 10 Pro), Sony BDP-S390 BD player, Pioneer AVR, Raspberry Pi running Kodi and Plex, Panasonic 60" 3D plasma, Google Chromecast

System Two: Popcorn Hour A200 ,  Oppo BDP-80 BluRay Player with hardware mode to be region free, Vivitek HD1080P 1080P DLP projector with 100" screen. Harman Kardon HK AVR 254 7.1 receiver, Samsung 4K player, Google Chromecast

 


My Google+ page 

 

 

 

https://plus.google.com/+laurencechiu

 

 


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