Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.


3g



329 posts

Ultimate Geek


# 42006 28-Sep-2009 08:45
Send private message

Maybe I had missed this info, but according to an article on stuff.

"You can use a mobile phone held in a cradle while driving, but only to make, receive or terminate a phone call. You cannot use them in any other way, such as reading a GPS map, reading email or consulting an electronic diary."

http://www.stuff.co.nz/technology/2907464/SatNav-phones-will-be-illegal-Govt

I've got a dedicated GPS unit, but have to admit the integration with Yellow makes Vodafone Compass a pretty amazing app. I've put it head-to-head with my dedicated unit, and found (probably due to the constantly updated maps with Compass) that Compass seems to work as well, if not better.

Thoughts?

NH

View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
 1 | 2
1705 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted

  # 258896 28-Sep-2009 09:55
Send private message

so how is using a GPS on a phone any worse than on a dedicated unit? Same goes for MP3 players.

107 posts

Master Geek


  # 258902 28-Sep-2009 10:08
Send private message

Sounds like a badly drafted law which will have to be rewritten in a couple of years due to the all in one nature that music /mobile / gps / nav devices are evolving into.

I see no difference between a dedicated nav device and an iPhone in cradle operating with TomTom maps.

 
 
 
 


Ham

462 posts

Ultimate Geek


  # 258904 28-Sep-2009 10:11
Send private message

Only difference I see is that a phone/GPS combo is more likely to be mounted lower down on the dash not up on the windshield.. Maybe Tomtom and other developers will have to disable the phone function when GPS is in use??

Human
2949 posts

Uber Geek

Subscriber

  # 258907 28-Sep-2009 10:13
Send private message

allstarnz: so how is using a GPS on a phone any worse than on a dedicated unit? Same goes for MP3 players.


+1

unless they're going to make GPS units illegal, or the operation of them while driving.

i should think as long as your mobile phone is mounted correctly, you should be fine.'

Like Alistar said above; How is it any different?





970 posts

Ultimate Geek

Trusted
Vodafone

  # 258919 28-Sep-2009 10:39

We're going to ask for some clarity around it and I'll let you know if/when we hear back...

but I must say (personally) it looks a bit odd. I can put a phone in a cradle and use it as a phone. I can put a sat nav device in a cradle and use it as a sat nav but I can't put a device in a cradle and use it as a sat nav if it also has phone capability...

The way the world's moving, most sat nav devices will have some form of comms built in if only so as to receive traffic updates. Would that be illegal as well?

I wouldn't like to see this law stranded as technology moves past it... it's too important for that.

cheers

Paul

Human
2949 posts

Uber Geek

Subscriber

  # 258922 28-Sep-2009 10:42
Send private message

PaulBrislen: We're going to ask for some clarity around it and I'll let you know if/when we hear back...

but I must say (personally) it looks a bit odd. I can put a phone in a cradle and use it as a phone. I can put a sat nav device in a cradle and use it as a sat nav but I can't put a device in a cradle and use it as a sat nav if it also has phone capability...

The way the world's moving, most sat nav devices will have some form of comms built in if only so as to receive traffic updates. Would that be illegal as well?

I wouldn't like to see this law stranded as technology moves past it... it's too important for that.

cheers

Paul


Thanks Paul, will be interesting to see the official answer to that.

I would only assume it's a no brainer, but then, 90% of assumptions are usually wrong.





132 posts

Master Geek


  # 258931 28-Sep-2009 11:11
Send private message

All we need is a car that drives its self and then we will be free to use any device we like.
Even a Microwave

 
 
 
 


Ham

462 posts

Ultimate Geek


  # 258937 28-Sep-2009 11:22
Send private message

Maybe it's there as a tool for the police.. Example; Constable Bacon pulls victim over for texting and driving, victim says "I wasn't texting I was making a calendar entry"

Then without this part of the law the officer is theoretically powerless.

The law needs to be a simple "Driving while distracted" to remove all confusion.


Hawkes Bay
8477 posts

Uber Geek

Mod Emeritus
Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  # 258939 28-Sep-2009 11:24
Send private message

Aaroona: 90% of assumptions are usually wrong.

Is that a fact you can cite, or just an assumption (lol).

76% of statistics are simply made up.







Human
2949 posts

Uber Geek

Subscriber

  # 258943 28-Sep-2009 11:31
Send private message

tonyhughes:
Aaroona: 90% of assumptions are usually wrong.

Is that a fact you can cite, or just an assumption (lol).

76% of statistics are simply made up.


I've got loads of statistics to back it up! Chances are though, they're wrong as well. lol






970 posts

Ultimate Geek

Trusted
Vodafone

  # 258944 28-Sep-2009 11:32

It's a positive change and we fully support the law... we're just seeking clarification on this point... It's a tricky area.

cheers

Paul




Paul Brislen
Head of Corporate Communications
Vodafone

http://forum.vodafone.co.nz


361 posts

Ultimate Geek


  # 258945 28-Sep-2009 11:33
Send private message

I'm not sure what they hope to accomplish.

My old TomTom would send and receive texts, phone calls when paired with my phone. How different is this really?

Our government so regularly stuffs up technology legislation it makes me worry about the rest of it ;).

2342 posts

Uber Geek

Subscriber

  # 258950 28-Sep-2009 11:41
Send private message

I guess that thing that is really concerning is that this will not address the people that are busy leaning over their Sat Nav's cradle tapping in a new address, whilst trying to drive on the motorway.




Handsome Dan Has Spoken.

1707 posts

Uber Geek


  # 258951 28-Sep-2009 11:48
Send private message

It is fairly common for SatNav units to have agreement or disclaimer pages on startup that dictate that the user agrees not to use the device while driving and that the manufacturer accepts no liability for any accidents caused by distraction.
Essentially you are only supposed to (as the driver) operate the SatNav while you're stationary.  The proposed law for mobile phones (as SatNav devices) sounds like it would be consistent with SatNav usage while driving.  Until GPS software manufacturers for phones add a page similar to their SatNav counterparts then its likely the Govt will need to spell out usage restrictions on devices.

And while the SatNav page is there it doesnt really change driver behaviour in using the devices while driving but it does highlight it cant be used as an excuse for distraction.  I imagine phones will be in the same category.....

919 posts

Ultimate Geek

Trusted

  # 258955 28-Sep-2009 12:05
Send private message

Ham: 
The law needs to be a simple "Driving while distracted" to remove all confusion.




 

There are already the dangerous driving laws which cover this. Making a law that explicitly covers mobile phone use sends more of a direct message to phone-using drivers that what they're doing is dangerous.




 

 1 | 2
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic



Switch your broadband provider now - compare prices


Twitter and LinkedIn »



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:





News »

Vodafone integrates eSIM into device and wearable roadmap
Posted 17-Jan-2020 09:45


Do you need this camera app? Group investigates privacy implications
Posted 16-Jan-2020 03:30


JBL launches headphones range designed for gaming
Posted 13-Jan-2020 09:59


Withings introduces ScanWatch wearable combining ECG and sleep apnea detection
Posted 9-Jan-2020 18:34


NZ Police releases public app
Posted 8-Jan-2020 11:43


Suunto 7 combine sports and smart features on new smartwatch generation
Posted 7-Jan-2020 16:06


Intel brings innovation with technology spanning the cloud, network, edge and PC
Posted 7-Jan-2020 15:54


AMD announces high performance desktop and ultrathin laptop processors
Posted 7-Jan-2020 15:42


AMD unveils four new desktop and mobile GPUs including AMD Radeon RX 5600
Posted 7-Jan-2020 15:32


Consolidation in video streaming market with Spark selling Lightbox to Sky
Posted 19-Dec-2019 09:09


Intel introduces cryogenic control chip to enable quantum computers
Posted 10-Dec-2019 21:32


Vodafone 5G service live in four cities
Posted 10-Dec-2019 08:30


Samsung Galaxy Fold now available in New Zealand
Posted 6-Dec-2019 00:01


NZ company oDocs awarded US$ 100,000 Dubai World Expo grant
Posted 5-Dec-2019 16:00


New Zealand Rugby Selects AWS-Powered Analytics for Deeper Game Insights
Posted 5-Dec-2019 11:33



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.


Support Geekzone »

Our community of supporters help make Geekzone possible. Click the button below to join them.

Support Geezone on PressPatron



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.