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frankv

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#196830 14-Jun-2016 15:07
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Hi all,

 

I'm thinking about ditching the landline and switching to VOIP, but really have no idea how to go about that. Or even if it's a good idea. Is there a "How to switch to VOIP in NZ" guide available somewhere? I found this but it's from 2009... I guess it's no longer totally correct?

 

I currently have my home landline and broadband (ADSL, soon to be VDSL, fibre's not even on the horizon :( ) with Spark. Wifi is accessible throughout the house and over most of the section. Currently my phone system is a cordless base station with answerphone and 2 handsets. Modem, computer, and phones are on UPS for comms in an emergency. The main use of the landline is just for incoming calls, because I never use all my cellular free monthly calling minutes anyway.

 

Some specific questions:

 

  • Is VOIP worth bothering about? Should I just throw away the whole landline, not bother with VOIP, and just use cellphones for voice calls? If I do this, I guess I can get my landline number redirected to my cellphone? Any other gotchas with ditching the landline? 
  •  

    If I go with VOIP, can I keep my existing phone number? If I can't, all the rest is pretty much moot, I think. It would be just as easy to tell everyone my cellphone number as to give them a new VOIP number.

     

  • Assuming VOIP is still a good idea...

     

    • Can my family use their cellphones over WiFi to answer incoming VOIP phone calls? Or can I get multiple VOIP handsets that answer the same number and work over my Wifi? I guess I'll need to install some kind of VOIP/SIP software on my desktop (Ubuntu Linux 16.04) for either of those solutions?
    • My HG659B modem says it supports VOIP and has a "Phone" port. Presumably I could just plug my cordless base station (2 handsets, answer phone) into that, and don't need an ATA?
    • From the modem manual, it appears I need a VOIP provider. Would that be Spark? Or how about 2talk? Or someone else?

Any other suggestions or comments would be welcome.

 

Frank

 

 


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ubergeeknz
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  #1571735 14-Jun-2016 15:10
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So for the end user, the only real difference for a home line being delivered over voip is that you are probably having to pay less for it.

 

What are you hoping to gain by switching to VoIP?


deadlyllama
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  #1571781 14-Jun-2016 16:05
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Short answer: look at what 2talk can do for you. They have an phone app, and you can register several devices to their SIP server. So your hg659 could supply your existing cordless phones with service, and you could run the app to make calls with your smartphones.

In the old days you'd install asterisk on a PC, etc, but 2talk will do pretty much anything you'd have got asterisk to do, at no extra charge.

 
 
 
 


gregmcc
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  #1571811 14-Jun-2016 16:51
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1) you will have to switch to "Naked" broadband, this means xDSL without a traditional phone line

 

2) you will have to port your existing phone number to your VOIP provider (such as 2talk), your VOIP provider should be able to arrange this for you

 

3) Configure your router, at one stage I have a "free 028" VOIP number with 2talk configured with my HG559, is was a bit of a mission but got there in the end.

 

 

 

Before you ditch your phone line, get your router fully configured on a free 028 2talk number, that way all you have to do is change the number and password and your away

 

Maybe worth the investment of a more modern and easily configurable router, I've been using a Nettcom NF4V for several years with no problems or maybe use an ATA adaptor as the HG559 can be a PITA to setup.

 

 


ghettomaster
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  #1571825 14-Jun-2016 16:59
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ghettomaster
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  #1571826 14-Jun-2016 16:59
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I assume you would be able to port your current number, not that I've ever tried.


DarkShadow
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  #1571907 14-Jun-2016 19:45
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frankv:

 

  • Assuming VOIP is still a good idea...

     

    • Can my family use their cellphones over WiFi to answer incoming VOIP phone calls? Or can I get multiple VOIP handsets that answer the same number and work over my Wifi? I guess I'll need to install some kind of VOIP/SIP software on my desktop (Ubuntu Linux 16.04) for either of those solutions?

 

Yes. Yes. Yes you can if you like, but you don't have to, because in most cases the cloud hosted solutions are quite enough.

 

 

  •  

    • My HG659B modem says it supports VOIP and has a "Phone" port. Presumably I could just plug my cordless base station (2 handsets, answer phone) into that, and don't need an ATA?

  •  

    • From the modem manual, it appears I need a VOIP provider. Would that be Spark? Or how about 2talk? Or someone else?

 

Yes. Or you can do the cellphone app/VoIP handsets/PC software you mentioned above. Or do all of them. VoIP is quite flexible and you can customize it to your needs.

 

No, Spark doesn't do residential VoIP so you'll need someone else. 2talk or WxC are the two main providers.

 

 


jonathan18
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  #1572105 15-Jun-2016 09:04
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To follow up from a post above - are you clear as to the value/benefits you'll gain from moving to VOIP? Is it so you can reduce your plan to a naked connection and save a bit of money? And how much are those savings worth compared to the hassle of establishing and setting up a VOIP connection? It'll mean dealing with two companies to provide the same services previously provided by one; the process of setting up is a bit fiddly; you'll lose the greater security of (wired) phones working in a power cut (I note you've got a UPS but that'll only provide a short-term fix); and, if things go wrong with the phone connection, it's really up to you to fix it.

 

We switched over to a separate VOIP provider a few months back when we moved from Snap to BigPipe, and that was price- and service-driven (saving something like $30 a month over what we'd be paying Snap for the same). Thanks to some useful posts and help here on GZ it went fine, though as mentioned is a little fiddly (eg, to ensure you get the cheapest 2Talk connection - $6 a month I think - involves porting your existing number to an existing free 2Talk account; this, however, also fits in well with the sensible advice above to try out VOIP using a free account). We are now using an HG659 (assume it's fairly similar to yours), and set-up in that was pretty straight-forward.

 

Note: if you're switching ISPs (which may make sense if part of the rationale is cost savings - I pay $85 all up for unlimited 100/20 and phone) I understand some people with BigPipe as their ISP have had problems with VOIP if they don't have a static IP address (a number of posts on this issue elsewhere on GZ); personally this hasn't been an issue for me, but these kinds of things probably need to be considered as part of your decision-making process.


 
 
 
 


dazhann
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  #1572169 15-Jun-2016 09:59
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MY main reason for going to voip was because I went to wireless rbi.If I had wished to retained the landline it was going to cost $50 a month, so a bit of a no brainer cost wise. I have to say though voip over wireless, in my case, is a bit hit and miss quality wise. I believe over fibre it is a lot better.

 

If you are still getting your broadband over cable, the cost saving going naked isn't that great, $20? If you do make a lot of calls then the rates on 2talk are better then most telcos.  Ditching the landline would also require converting those people you want to hear from to ring you on your mobile. But conversely you wont have to put up with annoying marketing, can I help you fix your computer calls     


crewsaider
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  #1572265 15-Jun-2016 11:49
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I went to VOIP a year or so ago when I upgraded to VDSL and changed ISP. I elected to go with 2talk and the process I took was as follows:

 

1. As my modem/router is not VOIP capable, I purchased a Linksys PAP2 ATA, one of number supported by 2talk.

 

2. Signed-up to the 2talk free plan which gave me an 028 number.

 

3. Followed the provisioning guide at https://live.2talk.co.nz/provisioning/linksyspap2t-guide.html

 

4. Once I was happy with the 028 setup I upgraded to the $10 plan and followed the porting process outlined at

 

http://www.2talk.co.nz/supportview.html?doc=numberporting and all worked very smoothly with good information flow.

 

5. Once ported, I added the number to the ATA, plugged in the wireless phone base station and all has been good ever since.

 

To me, the advantages of VOIP are numerous. With 250 free national and country minutes, I no longer have to pay toll charges to call Christchurch, just 20km away, and my wife can chat to her family in the UK for free! I use the 2talk answer service, rather than the base station, because, in the event of a power/broadband failure, a message can still be left; moreover, an email is sent with the message attached and can be downloaded via mobile. I run the Zoiper app on my mobile registered to my 2talk account which give access to my number and answering service from anywhere in the world. Thus, even if I shut-down my modem/router while away, I still have contact with the national number. All this for just $11.50 per month!!


dazhann
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  #1572293 15-Jun-2016 12:17
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Crewsaider whats the main differences between 2talks  mobile app and zoipers.


chevrolux
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  #1572371 15-Jun-2016 13:23
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dazhann:

 

Crewsaider whats the main differences between 2talks  mobile app and zoipers.

 

 

The 2talk app has all the sip settings baked in to it, meaning all you need to do is enter your phone number/password and it works. It connects with TLS which can help with some networks firewall/NAT configurations.

 

Whereas zoiper is a generic sip softphone and requires you to set up all the sip settings yourself.

 

Personally, I think Bria is the best soft phone. A lot more polished than any of the others, also has the ability for a few nice extras - like buying the g729 codec.


crewsaider
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  #1572408 15-Jun-2016 14:09
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dazhann:

 

Crewsaider whats the main differences between 2talks  mobile app and zoipers.

 

 

 

 

Pretty much personal preference, upload both (and there are numerous other SIP apps) and see which appeals to you.


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