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179 posts

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Topic # 65061 28-Jul-2010 18:58
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Hi guys, hope someone has come across this before. 

I installed a heatpump in the baby (now toddler) room. After installation the room humidity started getting down to 15-25% through the night here in Wellington. 

In the meantime our baby had lots of ear infections and long recovery times. The gp recommended vicks warm steam vaporizer and the difference was amazing. No more infections and short colds etc. 

The vaporizer is basically a glorified boiler. It pumps out huge volumes!

This winter the humidifier is back but it pumps humidity to 60-80% depending on weather. 

Problem is condensation all over the walls, the windows and now unfortunately has seeped into the gib at the side of one window;(

Anyone know a good builder in welly who could help with the window frame/gib?

And if you have a better humidification idea? I'd like to maintain it up to 50% ideally and not just pump out liters of steam. 

Thanks!

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  Reply # 357988 28-Jul-2010 22:07
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You get condensation because you are losing so much heat thru those surfaces and the moisture gets left behind as the heat leaves.

Insulate, get proper glass and you should be able to get the humiidity up to where it should be. I have never got why people who heat their houses need dehumidifiers in winter since I get the same thing happening with just a couple of oil heaters going. 30% humidity because it has all gone on the windows and drained out the bottom of them.




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  Reply # 358339 29-Jul-2010 13:14
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Not really - I dont get any condensation if I dont turn the humidifier on. This house is super dry.

Its really well insulated as well - double glazing, etc. etc. the heatpump barely has to stay on (unless we're in a bitterly cold southerly).

My problem is I need the humidifier for my sons health - it just creats the additional 40-50% humidity thats causing the condensation.

I'll spend some time googling for a humidifier with a humidistat!

 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 358432 29-Jul-2010 14:45
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Remove the too-cold surfaces and you remove the condensation, or alternatively, reduce the humidity below the level where it will condense on those cold surfaces.  

Plastic sheet "double glazing" (see thread in this forum) might be a good start.




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  Reply # 358452 29-Jul-2010 15:13
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Thanks.. I'll look at that.. I suppose its a lot harder to do when its 20C inside and 3C outside!

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  Reply # 358501 29-Jul-2010 16:18
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acsonline:


And if you have a better humidification idea? I'd like to maintain it up to 50% ideally and not just pump out liters of steam.Â



Trial and error dont leave it on 24/7 figure out how long it needs to be on for nd when e.g. before beg when your son will be in the room for an extended period.




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  Reply # 358518 29-Jul-2010 16:30
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You can dry your damp / wet clothes in the room on a drying rack rather than a tumble drier; this will definitely increase the humidity in the room but not to the extent that the water condenses on the wall, and it will save you stacks of power too.



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  Reply # 358549 29-Jul-2010 16:57
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Thanks for the suggestions!

I tried putting the clothes A-frame with variable amounts of wet clothes - but you can guess what happens to it when your 2 year old gets up in the morning! That didnt last long..

Im now trying to find something that doest just belt out the moisture like the Vicks steam vaporiser (it doesnt have a humidistat, so it keeps going until empty). I have tried varying water levels but you have to "predict" how cold its going to be (the colder it is, the more water you need to put in!).


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  Reply # 362294 3-Aug-2010 12:42
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How about use an oil column heater temporarily instead of the heat pump?

Vice versa I can't see how living in an essentially damp environment will be good for your sons health either. If you're making it damp and warm I'd be betting that's a great place for mould to start growing too, like in the mattress etc.



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  Reply # 362297 3-Aug-2010 12:46
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Hi.. the oil column heater used to be good in Auckland, but pretty hard to regulate temperature here in Wellington. Ive not got the vaporizer on a timer, so that it runs for 4-5 hours, depending on what the minimum temperature outside is going to be.

now if only i could get a humidistat instead of the electrical timer to control output!

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  Reply # 362521 3-Aug-2010 16:55
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I put a bowl ontop of the oil heater with water in it. Problem solved except for the scum that gets left in the bowl which the dishwasher will not move.




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  Reply # 363508 5-Aug-2010 10:12
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acsonline: Problem is condensation all over the walls, the windows and now unfortunately has seeped into the gib at the side of one window;(
I'll say it again, having gone away thinking about this, seriously what you are describing here can not be healthy!

The above sounds like a self inflicted leaky home situation, like you are asking someone to live in a constantly steamed up bathroom.  That level of moisture and heat simply must lead to mould/fungus eventually.

Not sure if water on top of an electrical device is the total solution, but personally I'd be investigating alternative options.  Perhaps run your steam device briefly prior to bed or something for instance.

Anyway, sorry, just my $0.02.

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  Reply # 363917 5-Aug-2010 21:13
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Well unless I was to replace the glass with decent stuff, and probably the frame too, then there will always be moisture stripped out of it when inside is getting near 20 degrees warmer than outside.

Sounds like the OP's house has no insulation and will be costing a fortune to keep warm so I would think renovating and relining inorder to insulate would be a good idea.




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  Reply # 364010 6-Aug-2010 06:27
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The point that I am struggling with is that as far as I am aware a heatpump only drys the air when it is on cooling? When it is heating it should not be making the air any drier anyway?

Heak our server room at work which has a aircon unit cooling the room 24/7 does not get the humidity anywhere near that low (15-25)







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  Reply # 364012 6-Aug-2010 06:40
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now if only i could get a humidistat instead of the electrical timer to control output!


Here you go http://xpelair.co.nz/afawcs0141432/CATID=18/ID=20/SID=1030025853/productdetails.html

and here http://www.securimax.co.nz/fans/fan_accessories/humidistat_controllers.php you should be able to get these from someone like Mastertrade

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  Reply # 364033 6-Aug-2010 08:26
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kiwitrc:


now if only i could get a humidistat instead of the electrical timer to control output!


Here you go http://xpelair.co.nz/afawcs0141432/CATID=18/ID=20/SID=1030025853/productdetails.html

and here http://www.securimax.co.nz/fans/fan_accessories/humidistat_controllers.php you should be able to get these from someone like Mastertrade


Those humidistats turn on when a certain humidity level is reached, ie a steamy bathroom etc,

The OP is seeking a humidistat to turn Off when a certain level is reached,

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