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Topic # 66391 18-Aug-2010 13:06
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I moved to NZ a couple of years ago and have a couple of questions about the road rules here. I've driven quite a bit in Australia and UK and I know the major differences in rules here, but I've been trying to find info about a couple of rules I'm unsure of. I've been trying to find the info on the MOT website but I can't find answers to the following:



  • At a 4 way stop sign, do you give way to your right (like a roundabout) or the car that got to the intersection first (like in the US)?

  • Is it legal to turn right across a double yellow line or a solid white line onto a side road? There's an intersection near me where there's a side road about 5 metres from a T intersection with traffic lights, the map is here (turning onto Stapletons Road)




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447 posts

Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 369259 18-Aug-2010 13:22
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I didn't even realise we had a 4-way stop sign intersection here. Though if I was in one, I would apply the give way to right rule.

Turning right across double yellows: My driveway used to be in a similar position. I used to turn right across the double yellows, a couple of times I had cop cars behind me and they didn't say anything.

Interesting questions though, I would be interested to know the actual legal standpoint on these.

xpd

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  Reply # 369261 18-Aug-2010 13:24
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You mean you get to a crossroad intersection and everyone has a stop sign ? If so, Ive never seen that in NZ, usually just the two facing roads have the signs and the other roads are free to go. If such an intersection is around, then personally Id use the give way to right rule.

Yellow markings are generally no go areas, so cutting across one could land you in trouble. Solid white should be fine.

This reponse is from what I picked up years ago during my driving lessons etc, what the exact law is on it, Im not sure, best to consult with the police.




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  Reply # 369265 18-Aug-2010 13:29
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Thanks, yer it's a bit of a grey area and every one I've asked doesn't know - my partner's uncle's a cop down in Dunedin so I might ask him the next time I see him.

I hadn't seen a four-way stop sign in NZ until I moved to the area I live in, there's a couple on a street near me, a picture is here

I have no idea what purpose it serves other than to confuse motorists, they're very low use streets.

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  Reply # 369266 18-Aug-2010 13:30
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1)
http://www.nzta.govt.nz/resources/roadcode/about-driving/giving-way-at-controlled-intersections.html
Stop sign
At an intersection controlled by a Stop sign you must:


  • come to a complete stop, not just slow down

  • stop where you can see vehicles coming from all directions

  • stay stopped and give way to all other vehicles (including cycles, motorcycles etc)

  • <b><i> use the give way rules if you and another vehicle are coming towards each other and you are both at Stop signs </b></i>



  • not go until it is safe for you and all other traffic.



2)
http://www.nzta.govt.nz/resources/roadcode/about-driving/turning.html
Making a turn over a no-passing line
<b><i>You can cross over the solid yellow no-passing line (if it is safe to do so) when making a turn to enter a driveway or side road. </b></i>

However, bear in mind that no-passing lines are often marked where visibility is limited, so special care is required. It may be safer to turn further along the road, where visibility is better. See Passing for more information about no-passing lines.

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  Reply # 369269 18-Aug-2010 13:34
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meesham: I hadn't seen a four-way stop sign in NZ until I moved to the area I live in, there's a couple on a street near me, a picture is here.


Ahh I see the confusion. You're trying to apply a road rule to what is obviously a garden!



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  Reply # 369274 18-Aug-2010 13:37
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Thanks Wellygary, that's answered my questions, from that I think give way to the right would apply and that's a definite answer to turning across yellow lines.

nickd:
meesham: I hadn't seen a four-way stop sign in NZ until I moved to the area I live in, there's a couple on a street near me, a picture is here.


Ahh I see the confusion. You're trying to apply a road rule to what is obviously a garden!


Yer I'm glad we didn't move onto the street with the huge trees, it looks nice but they get absolutely no sun!

There's another intersection further up that's a little less garden-ish :)


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  Reply # 369276 18-Aug-2010 13:38
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I hadn't seen a four-way stop sign in NZ until I moved to the area I live in, there's a couple on a street near me, a picture is here


What! I have never seen this before. I too would like to know the answer. I have only ever seen two stops and 2 give ways max. Strange. 

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  Reply # 369279 18-Aug-2010 13:44
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For those in Wellington, the intersection of Abel Smith and Cuba streets is a 4 way stop sign.

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  Reply # 369281 18-Aug-2010 13:46
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There's a 4-way stop in Petone I used to drive thru frequently. They're a PITA mainly because you're trying to read the mind of every other git on the intersection and hope like hell _they_ follow the road code.

NZ does not use courtesy stops like they do in the US. This is sad, but true. They work quite well there from what i've seen (driven, and been passenger, several times in MD, VI and DC)


Also solid white line is a cautionary line only, it doesn't change your legal right to cross over it (or not) but usually bears consideration as it often marks something else (like an intersection) where it is illegal to overtake.

no-right-turn would only be enforced by post signage or some sort of physical barrier, or by circumstance (if you caused a rediculous impact to traffic waiting behind you, it'd be classed as illegal I expect, but good luck with that).





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  Reply # 369282 18-Aug-2010 13:46
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Heh Streetviewed the intersection.... someone must have been bored. Is there a camera tucked away anywhere in a tree watching the confusion the 4 way stop causes ? :)




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  Reply # 369284 18-Aug-2010 13:46
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Have one where we live and it is quite simple, you come to a stop, if it is clear to proceed you do so however on the 4 way stop round about the same rule applies but whoever is on the roundabout then has right of way. So if you get hit on your right side of the car on entering a roundabout you are in the wrong if however you hit someones righthand side you are in the right. It works quite smoothly if all parties know what is going on.
One strange point is that you do not indicate going on to the rondabout but when you exit this can slow things down as you wait to see where soneone is exiting just to find they are going straight and you could have moved off.

You can not cross a solid white line ( same way 2 lane road ) you must wait until the line breaks and then you can cross lanes after indicating 3 seconds before. So on entering a solid line area you indicate a change in lanes ( funny that the usual distance of a solid white line is 3 seconds @50K ) and once the line breaks you cross
 

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  Reply # 369288 18-Aug-2010 13:51
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Turning across double yellow lines: Yes that's fine, they are there to indicate no passing. That said, common sense prevails, in that they are usually in areas where it's not safe for one reason or another to pass, limited visibility etc, so take the necessary care.

4 way intersections do exist. There are rules for them and they apply at any time there are 4 directions with the same level of control. eg 4 unmarked roads, 4 giveway signs, 4 stop signs. Another example is when traffic lights fail.


Straight through traffic takes priority over turning.
Straight through traffic coming at you from the right takes priority.
When turning left give way to traffic coming from your right.
When turning right, giveway to turning traffic coming from your right.

Basic rule of thumb is don't get hit on your drivers door.

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  Reply # 369292 18-Aug-2010 13:53
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scotteffone:
I hadn't seen a four-way stop sign in NZ until I moved to the area I live in, there's a couple on a street near me, a picture is here


What! I have never seen this before. I too would like to know the answer. I have only ever seen two stops and 2 give ways max. Strange. 


Wellington - Abel Smith St / Cuba St intersection has a 4-way stop (easy to check out of Google Maps).  I've always applied the first in first served approach since, assuming the other car arrives after you, and actually stops, then you should have time to get across - the right hand rule is my backup!!  This is obviously because I don't know the answer to the question as to what the rule actually is!!

EDIT - I'm so slow composing that three people get in before me while I'm still writing!!





"It is useless to attempt to reason a man out of what he was never reasoned into."
— most commonly attributed to Jonathan Swift, author/theologian

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  Reply # 369297 18-Aug-2010 13:55
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The intersection outside real grovy in Wellington was 4way stop. I used to sit on the steps for a while there hungover, great entertainment.

Roundabouts:
Turning Left, indicate left in advance of entering roundabout.
Turning Right, indicate right in advance of entering roundabout.
Straight through, do not indicate in advance.

In all cases, inidcate left after last exit before the one you want to exit on.

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  Reply # 369298 18-Aug-2010 13:56
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4 way intersections do exist. There are rules for them and they apply at any time there are 4 directions with the same level of control. eg 4 unmarked roads, 4 giveway signs, 4 stop signs. Another example is when traffic lights fail.


Straight through traffic takes priority over turning.
Straight through traffic coming at you from the right takes priority.
When turning left give way to traffic coming from your right.
When turning right, giveway to turning traffic coming from your right.

Basic rule of thumb is don't get hit on your drivers door.


That makes sense and is the law but if four cars all want to go straight you run into issues. I don't recall reading in the road code that priority goes to the first car that stopped even though that seems logical. I could have missed it though!

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